The Great War: Breakthroughs (Great War Series #3)

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"Is it the war to end all wars - or war without end? What began as a conflict in Europe, when Germany unleashed a lightning assault on its enemies, soon spread to North America, as a long-simmering hatred between two independent nations explodes. Twice in fifty years the Confederate States of America has humiliated their northern neighbor. Now revenge may at last be at hand." "Under the leadership of Teddy Roosevelt, and following a general named Custer - military genius or madman? - the United States are fighting a war on two fronts in 1917. In
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New York, NY 2000 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. No remainder marks, slight shelf wear. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. With dust jacket. 496 p. Contains: Illustrations. ... Great War, 3. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

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Hardcover New Ships From Canada. New in new dust jacket. 486 p. : 1 map; 25 cm. Includes Maps. Book Description Is it the war to end all wars--or war without end? What began as ... a conflict in Europe, when Germany unleashed a lightning assault on its enemies, soon spreads to North America, as a long-simmering hatred between two independent nations explodes. Twice in fifty years the Confederate States of America had humiliated their northern neighbor. Now revenge may at last be at hand. Under the leadership of Teddy Roosevelt, and following a general named Custer--military genius or madman? --the United States are fighting a war on two fronts in 1917. In the north, from the Pacific to Quebec, U.S. forces in the air and on land are locked in battle against Canada and Great Britain. To the south, at the heart of a line that stretches from the Gulf of California to the Atlantic, Custer intends to do what none of his predecessors had ever managed: to smash through the Confederate barbwire entrenchments in. Read more Show Less

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New York 2000 Hard cover First edition. New in new dust jacket. 486 p. : 1 map; 25 cm. Includes Maps. Book Description Is it the war to end all wars--or war without end? What ... began as a conflict in Europe, when Germany unleashed a lightning assault on its enemies, soon spreads to North America, as a long-simmering hatred between two independent nations explodes. Twice in fifty years the Confederate States of America had humiliated their northern neighbor. Now revenge may at last be at hand. Under the leadership of Teddy Roosevelt, and following a general named Custer--military genius or madman? --the United States are fighting a war on two fronts in 1917. In the north, from the Pacific to Quebec, U.S. forces in the air and on land are locked in battle against Canada and Great Britain. To the south, at the heart of a line that stretches from the Gulf of California to the Atlantic, Custer intends to do what none of his predecessors had ever managed: to smash through the Confederate barbwire entrenchments in T Read more Show Less

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Westminster, Maryland, U.S.A. 2000 H Hardcover F 1st/1st Book New in J New jacket 1st/1st, SIGNED. Flat signed by the author. This book is square, solid, unread and appears ... brand new. Its unclipped, Brodart protected dust jacket appears to be in perfect shape as well. You'll turn cartwheels of glee when this book gets to you! ! ! Signed: I Signed by Author(s) Read more Show Less

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The Great War: American Front (Great War Series #1)

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Overview

"Is it the war to end all wars - or war without end? What began as a conflict in Europe, when Germany unleashed a lightning assault on its enemies, soon spread to North America, as a long-simmering hatred between two independent nations explodes. Twice in fifty years the Confederate States of America has humiliated their northern neighbor. Now revenge may at last be at hand." "Under the leadership of Teddy Roosevelt, and following a general named Custer - military genius or madman? - the United States are fighting a war on two fronts in 1917. In the north, from the Pacific to Quebec, U.S. forces in the air and on land are locked in battle against Canada and Great Britain. To the south, at the heart of a line that stretches from the Gulf of California to the Atlantic, Custer intends to do what none of his predecessors had ever managed: to smash through the Confederate barbwire entrenchments in Tennessee." "Here are leather-jacketed daredevil pilots flying unproved fighters into anti-aircraft fire. Here is a melee on the sea, as U.S. sailors duel Confederate submariners, while the English, French, and Japanese surface navies vie for control of the shipping lanes. In Harry Turtledove's incredibly imagined alternate history, the Great War is played out over a cast of vivid characters. Amid the sound and fury of battle, as nonaligned nation-states choose sides and politicians spew bombast far from the front lines, The Great War: Breakthroughs captures a world war at an apocalyptic turning point. Victory is at hand - but at a price that may be worse than war itself."--BOOK JACKET.
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Editorial Reviews

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Our Review
The Great War Continues
Harry Turtledove, the grand master of alternate history, adds The Great War: Breakthroughs, another enthralling tale of global conflict, to his Great War tetralogy (The Great War: American Front, The Great War: Walk in Hell). Turtledove presents the reader with several historically familiar characters and events plucked from the past that are cultivated in the vivid detail of his imagination and meticulous research. Here we have numerous political entanglements, dozens of protagonists, and a shocking atmosphere that grows ever more alarming until several countries around the planet lie on the brink of devastation. With bestsellers such as How Few Remain, The Guns of the South, and his other recent efforts Colonization: Second Contact and Into the Darkness, Harry Turtledove proceeds to draw his readers into warring worlds of neverwhen as his already incredible skills at providing an innovative but authentic tapestry develop even further.

Now, in The Great War: Breakthroughs, the story line has continued to unfold and becomes even more captivating than that in the first two volumes. As the Great War continues to ravage a divided North America, the Union seeks to garner revenge upon the Confederate States of America for its two humiliating past defeats. The once stable truce between the Confederate States of America and the Union has been smashed now that all of North America has been drawn into the global conflict. The year is 1917, and Germany stands as victor over Austria, France, and much of the rest of Europe. The South has not only won the Civil War but also a second civil war decades later, and the Union will risk everything to destroy its southern enemy.

Industrial technology has risen to include planes, flamethrowers, and submarines, making the Great War even more horrific for both the military and civilians trapped by the battles. Slave uprisings have led to greater social upheaval as they attempt to form their own republic. Confrontations occur in the seas as enemy navies clash. Teddy Roosevelt and General Custer are now forced to fight on two fronts. Canada and Great Britain have formed an alliance to attack from the north, where soldiers do their best to survive the atrocities of trench warfare at the Canadian border. And to the south, Custer is forced to make a courageous and perhaps insane thrust into Confederate territories through miles of lethal blockades.

As with his Civil War alternate history novels and his WorldWar series, Harry Turtledove propels The Great War: Breakthroughs by giving historical figures complicated personalities that hold our interest. As the war diversifies across the globe with the addition of hideously new engines of destruction, Turtledove piles bloody incidents on top of one another, weaving a vast but ultimately very personal story. The complex, multi-viewpoint saga presents perspectives from both sides of the war, as well as from civilians caught up in the ghastly events. Scenes rapidly switch between person to person, country to country, president to soldier.

Details of warfare occasionally take a backseat as social changes become more and more prevalent. We become involved with personal struggles and issues of freedom and liberty, vengeance and glory. There are dozens of primary and secondary protagonists, each with his own thoughts, hopes, and fears concerning the conflict. Frequent swaps in points of view show us the awful choices that must be made on a day-to-day basis by neighbors, family, and countrymen. The forthcoming fourth and final novel in the tetralogy will focus on the aftereffects of the great war upon the world and how nations and their people must rebuild, realign, and forgive.

The panoramic effect Turtledove always establishes in his novels works an extra level of realism to the plot, demonstrating the carnage on a worldwide scale while showing us the effects on people we've come to care about. The Great War: Breakthroughs is a powerful addition to this compelling series of a bloody war reminiscent of our own nightmarish past.

--Tom Piccirilli

Tom Piccirilli is the author of eight novels, including Hexes and Shards, and his Felicity Grove mystery series, consisting of The Dead Past and Sorrow's Crown. He has sold more than 100 stories to the anthologies Future Crimes, Bad News, The Conspiracy Files, and Best of the American West II. An omnibus collection of 40 stories titled Deep into That Darkness Peering has just been released by Terminal Fright Press. Tom divides his time between New York City and Estes Park, Colorado.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The historian and the creative writer unite in Turtledove to craft another impressive novel, this one the third in his series about an alternate WWI (American Front, Walk in Hell), which has seen a weakened Confederate States of America not only combating the U.S.A. but facing a communist revolt from within staged by its black slaves. In this imaginative sequel, Turtledove displays his usual mastery at maintaining suspense across a broad canvas, with characters that fans will be glad to encounter again: feisty Southern aristocrat Anne Colleton leads a group of militiamen to try to wrest control of her shattered plantation, Marshlands, from the Reds; short-order cook Nellie Semphroch and her amorous daughter escape trial as collaborators thanks to a visit from Teddy Roosevelt; General Custer and his unprecedented command of the army's "barrels"--tanks--division leads to the U.S. scoring some lightning-fast victories. Peace is won, but at a high cost: working mother Sylvia Enos must face the future without a job and as a widow, while Confederate sub commander Roger Kimball may face a war crimes tribunal. Echoing the Treaty of Versailles, the victors make the grave mistake of punishing their enemies so that they dream of revenge. Although a complete and skillfully executed tale in itself, this epic story leaves enough plot threads dangling to demand a fourth novel to tie them up. (Aug.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
As World War I rages across a divided American continent, the beleaguered United States seeks the opportune moment to gain revenge against its Confederate enemies regardless of the cost. Building on the momentum of the previous two series novels, The Great War: American Front and The Great War: Walk in Hell, Turtledove follows his large cast of historical and fictional characters through the turning point of the war to end all wars. Alternate history's grand master displays his acute knowledge of American history as well as his keen imagination as he paints a vivid portrait of a past that could have been. A good choice for most libraries. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
From the Publisher
"The leading author of alternate history."
--USA Today
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345405630
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/1/2000
  • Series: Great War Series , #3
  • Pages: 486
  • Product dimensions: 6.63 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Harry Turtledove was born in Los Angeles in 1949. He has taught ancient and medieval history at U.C.L.A., Cal State Fullerton, and Cal State L.A., and has published a translation of a ninth-century Byzantine chronicle, as well as several scholarly articles. He is also an award-winning full-time writer of science fiction and fantasy. His alternate history works have included several short stories and novels, including The Guns of the South, How Few Remain (winner of the Sidewise Award for Best Novel), the Great War epics: American Front and Walk in Hell, the Colonization books: Second Contact and Down to Earth, and most recently, American Empire: Blood and Iron, the start of a brand-new series. He is married to fellow novelist Laura Frankos. They have three daughters: Alison, Rachel, and Rebecca.
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Read an Excerpt

I Klaxons hooted the call to battle stations. George Enos sprinted along the deck of the USS Ericsson toward the one-pounder gun near the stern. The destroyer was rolling and pitching in the heavy swells of an Atlantic winter storm. Freezing rain made the metal deck slick as a Boston Common ice-skating rink.

Enos ran as confidently as a mountain goat bounding from crag to crag. Ice and heavy seas were second nature to him. Before the war sucked him into the Navy, he’d put to sea in fishing boats from Boston’s T Wharf at every season of the year, and gone through worse weather in craft a lot smaller than this one. The thick peacoat was warmer than a civilian slicker, too.

Petty Officer Carl Sturtevant and most of his crew were already at the depth-charge launcher near the one-pounder. The other sailors came rushing up only moments after Enos took his place at the antiaircraft gun.

He stared every which way, though with the weather so bad he would have been hard pressed to spot an aeroplane before it crashed on the Ericsson’s deck. A frigid gust of wind tried to yank off his cap. He grabbed it and jammed it back in place. Navy barbers kept his brown hair trimmed too close for it to hold in any heat on its own.

“What’s up?” he shouted to Sturtevant through the wind. “Somebody spot a periscope, or think he did?” British, French, and Confederate submersibles all prowled the Atlantic. For that matter, so did U.S. and German boats. If a friendly skipper made a mistake and launched a spread of fish at the Ericsson, her crew would be in just as much trouble as if the Rebs or limeys had attacked.

“Don’tknow.” The petty officer scratched at his dark Kaiser Bill mustache. “Shit, you expect ’em to go and tell us stuff? All I know is, I heard the hooter and I ran like hell.” He scratched his mustache again. “Long as we’re standing next to each other, George, happy New Year.”

“Same to you,” Enos answered in surprised tones. “It is today, isn’t it? I hadn’t even thought about it, but you’re right. Back when this damn war started, who would have thought it’d last into 1917?”

“Not me, I’ll tell you that,” Sturtevant said.

“Me, neither,” George Enos said. “I sailed into Boston harbor with a hold full of haddock the day the Austrian grand duke got himself blown up in Sarajevo. I figured the fight would be short and sweet, same as everybody else.”

“Yeah, so did I,” Sturtevant said. “Didn’t quite work out that way, though. The Kaiser’s boys didn’t make it into Paris, we didn’t make it into Toronto, and the goddamn Rebs did make it into Washington, and almost into Philadelphia. Nothin’ comes easy, not in this fight.”

“Ain’t it the truth?” Enos agreed fervently. “I was in river monitors on the Mississippi and the Cumberland. I know how tough it’s been.”

“The snapping-turtle fleet,” Sturtevant said with the good- natured scorn sailors of the oceanic Navy reserved for their inland counterparts. Having served in both branches, George knew the scorn was unjustified. He also knew he had no chance of convincing anyone who hadn’t served in a river monitor that that was so.

Lieutenant Armstrong Crowder came toward the stern, a pocket watch in one hand, a clipboard with some increasingly soggy papers in the other. Seeing him thus made Enos relax inside, though he did not ease his vigilant posture. Lieutenant Crowder took notes or checked boxes or did whatever he was supposed to do with those papers.

After he was done writing, he said, “Men, you may stand easy. This was only an exercise. Had the forces of the Entente been foolish enough to try our mettle, I have no doubt we would have sunk them or driven them off.”

He set an affectionate hand on the depth-charge launcher. It was a new gadget; until a few months before, ashcans had been “launched” by rolling them off the stern. Crowder loved new gadgets, and depth charges from this one actually had crippled a Confederate submarine. With a fisherman’s ingrained pessimism, George Enos thought that going from one crippled boat to a sure sinking was a long leap of faith.

Eventually, Lieutenant Crowder shut up and went away. Carl Sturtevant rolled his eyes. He had even less faith in gadgets than Enos did. “If that first torpedo nails us,” he said, “odds are we’re nothing but a whole raft of ‘The Navy Department regrets’ telegrams waiting to happen.”

“Oh, yeah.” George nodded. The all-clear sounded. He didn’t leave the one-pounder right away even so. As long as he had reason to be here by the rail, he aimed to take a good long look at as much of the Atlantic as he could. Just because the call to battle stations had been a drill did not mean no enemy submarines lurked out there looking for a target.

Quite a few sailors lingered by the rail, despite the rain and sleet riding the wind. “Don’t know why I’m bothering,” Carl Sturtevant said. “Half the Royal Navy could sail by within a quarter-mile of us and we’d never be the wiser.”

“Yeah,” Enos said again. “Well, this makes it harder for the submersibles to spot us, too.”

“I keep telling myself that,” the petty officer answered. “Sometimes it makes me feel better, sometimes it doesn’t. What it puts me in mind of is playing blindman’s buff where everybody’s got a blindfold on and everybody’s carrying a six-shooter. A game like that gets scary in a hurry.”

“Can’t say you’re wrong,” Enos replied, riding the deck shifting under his feet with automatic ease. He was a good sailor with a strong stomach, which got him respect from his shipmates even though, unlike so many of them, he wasn’t a career Navy man. “Could be worse, though—we could be running guns into Ireland again, or playing hide-and-seek with the limeys around the icebergs way up north.”

“You’re right—both of those would be worse,” Sturtevant agreed. “Sooner or later, we will cut that sea bridge between England and Canada, and then the Canucks will be in the soup.”

“Sooner or later,” George echoed mournfully. Before the war, the plan had been for the German High Seas Fleet to break out of the North Sea and rendezvous with the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, smashing the Royal Navy between them. But the Royal Navy had had plans of its own, and only the couple of squadrons of the High Seas Fleet actually on the high seas when war broke out were fighting alongside their American allies. “Sooner or later,” Enos went on, “I’ll get some leave and see my wife and kids again, too, but I’m not holding my breath there, either. Christ, George, Jr., turns seven this year.”

“It’s hard,” Sturtevant said with a sigh that made a young fogbank grow in front of his face. He peered out at the ocean again, then shook his head. “Hellfire, I’m only wasting my time and trying to fool myself into thinking I’ll be able to spot anything anyhow.”

That was probably true. George shook his head. No, that was almost certainly true. It didn’t keep him from staring at the sea till his eyelashes started icing up. If he saw a periscope—

At last, he concluded he wasn’t going to see a periscope, not even if a dozen of them were out there. Reluctantly, he headed back toward the bulkhead from which he’d been chipping paint. One big difference he’d discovered between the Navy and a fishing boat was that you had to look busy all the time in the Navy, regardless of whether you were.

Smoke poured from the Ericsson’s four stacks. No one had ever claimed beauty for the destroyer’s design. There were good and cogent reasons why no one had ever claimed beauty for it. Some people did claim she looked like a French warship, a claim that would have been vicious enough to start barroom brawls during shore leave if it hadn’t held such a large measure of truth.

Enos picked up the chisel he’d set down when the exercise began. He went back to work—chip, chip, chip. He spotted no rust under the paint he was removing, only bright metal. That meant his work was essentially wasted effort, but he’d had no way of knowing as much in advance. He went right on chipping. He couldn’t get in trouble for doing as he was told.

A chief petty officer swaggered by. He had less rank than any officer but more authority than most. For a moment, he beamed around his cigar at George’s diligence. Then, as if angry at letting himself be seen in a good mood, he growled, “You will police up those paint scraps from the deck, sailor.” His gravelly voice said he’d been smoking cigars for a lot of years.

“Oh, yes, Chief, of course,” Enos answered, his own voice dripping virtue. Since he really had intended to sweep up the paint chips, he wasn’t even acting. Propitiated, the petty officer went on his way. George thought about making a face behind his back, then thought better of it. Long tours aboard fishing boats even more cramped than the Ericsson had taught him he was always likely to be under somebody’s eyes, whether he thought so or not.

Another strip of gray paint curled against the blade of his chisel and fell to the deck. It crunched under his shoes as he took half a step down the corridor. His hands did their job with automatic competence, letting his mind wander where it would.

It wandered, inevitably, back to his family. He smiled at imagining his son seven years old. That was halfway to man-sized, by God. And Mary Jane would be turning four. He wondered what sort of fits she was giving Sylvia these days. She’d hardly been more than a toddler when he went into the Navy.

And, of course, he thought about Sylvia. Some of his thoughts about his wife were much more interesting than chipping paint. He’d been at sea a long time. But he didn’t just imagine her naked in the dark with him, making the mattress in their upstairs flat creak. She’d been different, distant, the last time he’d got leave in Boston. He knew he never should have got drunk enough to tell her about being on the point of going with that colored whore when his monitor got blown out of the water. But it wasn’t just that; Sylvia had been different ever since she’d got a job in the fish-packing plant: more on her own, less his wife.

He frowned as he tapped the chisel yet again. He wished she hadn’t had to go to work, but the allotment she took from his salary wasn’t enough to keep body and soul together, especially not with the Coal Board and the Ration Board and all the other government bureaus tightening the screws on civilians harder every day to support the war.

Then he frowned again, in a different way. The throb of the engines changed. He not only heard it, he felt it through his shoes. The Ericsson picked up speed and swung through a long, smooth turn.

A few minutes later, the chief petty officer came back down the corridor. “Why’d we change course?” Enos asked him. “Which way are we heading now?”

“Why? Damned if I know.” The chief sounded as if the admission pained him. “But I know which way we’re heading, by Jesus. We’re heading south.”

Private First Class Jefferson Pinkard sat in the muddy bottom of a trench east of Lubbock, Texas, staring longingly at the tin coffeepot above the little fire burning there. The wood that made the fire had been part of somebody’s fence or somebody’s house not so long before. Pinkard didn’t give a damn about that. He just wanted the coffee to boil so he could drink it.

A few hundred yards to the south, a couple of Yankee three-inch field guns opened up and started hitting the Confederate lines opposite them. “God damn those sons of bitches to hell and gone,” Pinkard said to anybody who would listen. “What the hell good do they think they’re going to do? They’ll just kill a few of us and maim a few more, and that’ll be that. They’re not going to break through. Shitfire, they’re not even trying to break through. Nothin’ but throwin’ a little death around for the fun of it, is all.”

The nearest soldier happened to be Hipolito Rodriguez. The stocky little farmer from the state of Sonora was darning socks, a useful soldierly skill not taught in basic training. He looked up from his work and said, “This whole war, it don’t make no sense to me. Why you think any one part of it is supposed to make sense when the whole thing don’t?”

“Damn good question, Hip,” Pinkard said. “Wish I had me a damn good answer.” He overtopped Rodriguez by nearly a head and could have broken him in half; he’d been a steelworker in Birmingham till conscription pulled him into the Army, and had the frame to prove it. Not only that, he was a white man, while Hip Rodriguez, like other Sonorans and Chihuahuans and Cubans, didn’t fit neatly into the Confederate States’ scheme of things. Rodriguez wasn’t quite black, but he wasn’t quite white, either—his skin was just about the color of his butternut uniform. What he was, Pinkard had discovered, was a fine soldier.

The coffee did boil then, and Jeff poured some into his tin cup. He drank. It was hotter than the devil’s front porch in July and strong enough to grow hair on a little old lady’s chest, but that suited him fine. Winter in Texas was worse than anything he’d known in Alabama, and he’d never tried passing an Alabama winter in a soggy trench, either.

Rodriguez came over and filled his cup, too. Sergeant Albert Cross paused on his way down the trench line. He squatted down by the fire and rolled himself a cigarette. “Don’t know where the dickens this war is getting to,” he remarked as he held the cigarette to the flames.
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 101 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2003

    5 Stars for this GREAT book!

    2nd book of this Alternate world of choas which started in How Few Remain. if you are interested in this book make sure that you read How Few Remain first it leads into the Great War series which leads into the American Empire series which leads to the yet to be released Settling Accounts series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Good book but badly transcribed

    Either the publisher should have given the E-book transcription a good error check or they should have hired someone literate to perform the transcription! Many errors that are not in the print version. Otherwise it is a good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    Awesome

    Awsome

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Loved it

    Another great one in the series.

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Great series

    I bought them all and want to read them again. If only I could trade for ebook versions.

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    End the stalemate

    And breakthrough to the end of the war. Great book in the series.

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Get Hooked

    I got Hooked on the whole series after reading this book; I bought all 11!

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Very interesting

    Has a very interesting mini-conclusion. The war is over! Read American Empire!

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Second in a great series

    Read it! Love it! Get hooked! Great story, very interesting!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2007

    GREAT

    I have read a lot of books looking for a good what if book. Now I have found a great what if timeline i was realy pleased with this book and i recomened it to anyone who loves history

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2007

    Excellent history

    I think it was well written, it gives and shows reasons of how World War One starts in this alternate history life. It also has World War One references.I really reccomend it.It has great descriptions of the different settings. The only bad thing is it's pretty long.also it has a cool map.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2003

    Just buy it

    If you are into civil war or science fiction this is a great combination which makes a great story, plot and overall is one of the best books ive ever read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2002

    The Breakthrough

    A tremendous finish to the Great War Series. Throughout the whole series I couldn't wait to see how it all ended, and the ending was as much as I expected. Turtledove has me hooked. I can't wait to start reading more of his work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2002

    War is Hell...

    ... and this book proves it. It is an awesome book describing war, and the affects it has on not only the soldiers, and the political leaders, but also civilians. It's action packed, and very hard to put down. A definite read for those who love war stories.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2001

    good start!

    a very good start to a good book. Harry always comes thru with a good novel-I hope he continues & puts out a new book in the near future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2001

    A Different Kind Of Great War

    I was intrigued, and a little skeptical, when I picked up 'The Great War: American Front'. Until then the only good 'what if?' novel I had read was 'Fatherland' by Robert Harris. While Mr. Turtledove's book is on a different level, it exceeded all of my expectations. The author seems to have put a great deal of thought into the plot and the characters. Almost all of the scenes in the book come across with a feeling of authenticity. Mr. Turtledove has succeeded in making this idea of the USA fighting the Confederacy during the Great war very credible. Rarely does the book fall into the 'wishful thinking' that ruins so many other alternate history books. From the fighting in the trenches, the uprising in Utah to the Marxist rebellion in the South, the book takes the reader on a ride through the unknown what could have been.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2000

    Turtledove is the best there is at alternate history!

    This serries is so enthralling that you will not be able to put the book down. I know this is said about many books but I really could not put it down. I finished it in three days and wanted more! I love the way he works fictional characters in with real historical figures and events.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2000

    Pretty good!

    I liked it, but as usual with Turtledove there are a lot of characters to keep track of. It is also would be nice if there were some characters from the rest of the world, not only from america. An intersting point is that military logic, of the time, demands an harsh peace which lay the seed for another war regardless of which side won. I wonder if the economical terms will be equally harsh as the ones for territory and if the end of war will lead to an recession. All in all it's a good book and I will probably by the final, hopefully, installment as well.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2000

    Turtledove does it again!

    In The Great War: Breakthroughs Turtledove has written one of his best books ever and possibly set the stage for more books about WWII. In this book the U.S. gets it revenge against the Confederates, Canada and Great Britan. I've waited for this book for three years to see the U.S. come out on top. It was worth the wait.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2000

    This is another great book by Harry Turtledove.

    This book continues the Great War series. It is very believeable and very entertaining. If you like history or science fiction this is a book for you. It is also good for action lovers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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