The Great War [NOOK Book]

Overview

The beginning of the nineteenth century marked the peak of Western imperial power. After subjugating "inferior" peoples in distant lands, the European states turned inward in an unparalleled orgy of self-destruction that began in 1914 and did not end until 1945. A remarkable achievement, The Great War revolutionizes our understanding of the First World War by placing it squarely in the context of Western imperialism. Distinguished historian John H. Morrow, Jr. shows how a world view saturated in aggression and ...
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The Great War

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NOOK Book (eBook - REV)
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Overview

The beginning of the nineteenth century marked the peak of Western imperial power. After subjugating "inferior" peoples in distant lands, the European states turned inward in an unparalleled orgy of self-destruction that began in 1914 and did not end until 1945. A remarkable achievement, The Great War revolutionizes our understanding of the First World War by placing it squarely in the context of Western imperialism. Distinguished historian John H. Morrow, Jr. shows how a world view saturated in aggression and fear—coupled with intellectual trends such as social Darwinism and eugenics—unleashed disastrous consequences. With particular attention to race, class, and gender issues, Morrow traces the conflict from origins to aftermath to provide the first truly global history of the war, one that emphasizes the experiences of soldiers in all theaters (Africans, Turks, etc.), as well as citizens on the many home fronts. Looking beyond the brutal trench warfare, Morrow argues that the war was won not in the fields of France but in the cold waters of the Atlantic, where blockades starved the central powers into submission.
Powerfully written, yet concise and comprehensive, The Great War is the definitive new history of the conflict that illustrates the destabilizing effects of imperialism on both the colonizers and the colonized.
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Editorial Reviews

Foreign Affairs
Morrow examines World War I as a global conflict among the empires created by western European nations. He accordingly devotes much of his attention to the fighting that took place outside of Europe, including the role of soldiers drawn from colonies and the many manifestations of racism by the colonial powers' armies. He also conveys the tremendous magnitude of the tragedy by examining the domestic dislocation caused by the war. Given such a large scale, it is not surprising that Morrow's characterizations of individuals are sometimes too summary and his generalizations too sweeping; for example, it is not exactly true that, in 1914, all European powers were equally nationalist, racist, imperialist, and war-obsessed. Although "aggression and fear" may well have "saturated the entire imperial world view," this does not mean that the desire to expand empires around the globe was the main cause of the war. These flaws are less important, however, than Morrow's success in conveying the global dimension and internal effects of a war waged on a scale previously unknown, with consequences that are still very much with us, in the Middle East and elsewhere.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780203016763
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/16/2005
  • Series: Routledge Classics Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 288
  • File size: 862 KB

Meet the Author

Marc Ferro (1924-). President of the Association of Research at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales and Co-Director of the prestigious French review Annales.
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Table of Contents

Translator's Note Introduction Part 1: 1. War, the Liberator 2. Patriotic War 3. Inevitable War 4. Imaginary War 5. 'War on War' 6. War is Declared Part 2: 7. From Movement to Stagnation 8. Strong Points and Weak Points 9. Verdun and the Great Battles 10. Cannon Fodder and the New Art of War 11. Styles of War: Direct and Indirect 12. World War and Total War 13. The Possible and the Impossible Part 3: 14. Tensions New and Old 15. Crises of War 16. Revolutionary Peace, Compromise Peace, Victorious Peace Part 4: 17. Between War and Crusade 18. The Illusions of Victory Select Bibliography Index

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