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Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy
     

Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy

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by John A. Quelch, Katherine E. Jocz
 

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Marketing has a greater purpose, and marketers, a higher calling, than simply selling more widgets, according to John Quelch and Katherine Jocz.

In Greater Good, the authors contend that marketing performs an essential societal function--and does so democratically. They maintain that people would benefit if the realms of politics and marketing were informed by

Overview

Marketing has a greater purpose, and marketers, a higher calling, than simply selling more widgets, according to John Quelch and Katherine Jocz.

In Greater Good, the authors contend that marketing performs an essential societal function--and does so democratically. They maintain that people would benefit if the realms of politics and marketing were informed by one another's best principles and practices.

Quelch and Jocz lay out the six fundamental characteristics that marketing and democracy share: (1) exchange of value, such as goods, services, and promises, (2) consumption of goods and services, (3) choice in all decisions, (4) free flow of information, (5) active engagement of a majority of individuals, and (6) inclusion of as many people as possible. Without these six traits, both marketing and democracy would fail, and with them, society.

Drawing on current and historical examples from economies around the world, this landmark work illuminates marketing's critical role in the development, growth, and governance of societies. It reveals how good marketing practices improve the political process and--in turn--the practice of democracy itself.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

The coauthors (associate dean and research associate, respectively, Harvard Business Sch.) assert that the two-party system has naturally emerged out of the U.S. Constitution's subtle bias toward majority rule while discouraging voter participation. They argue that parliamentary structures are more representative of a range of different constituencies and thus encourage greater participation; democracy can be improved by using the discipline of marketing, with new voters treated as prospective customers. Active participatory democracies-which equate to market share-would be the result. This may be one of the first books to bring these ideas together from a business perspective, but it does not convincingly synthesize politics and marketing. The missing link is the role of free markets as a driver of both. For those interested in the theme of democratization, Larry Diamond's recent The Spirit of Democracyprovides a substantive analysis of the connections between democracy and economics, particularly in relation to oil, and Amartya Sen's Development as Freedomalso studies voter participation as a function of economic development. Though its themes won't be new to business readers, this unusual challenge to conventional wisdom could be useful for political science and sociology students and, as an example of interdisciplinary thinking, is appropriate for college libraries.
—Stephen Turner Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422163672
Publisher:
Harvard Business Review Press
Publication date:
12/28/2007
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
331
File size:
795 KB

Meet the Author

John A. Quelch is Senior Associate Dean for International Development and Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He also serves as a non-executive director of WPP Group plc, the world's second-largest marketing services company. Katherine Jocz is a Research Associate in the Department of Research and Teaching Support at Harvard Business School.

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Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sergevansteenkiste More than 1 year ago
John Quelch and Katherine Jocz plead in ¿Greater Good¿ for a closer collaboration between marketing and democracy. Quelch and Jocz systematically point out the respective strengths and weaknesses of marketing and democracy. They do it through the study of the six characteristics that marketing and democracy share with each other in part one. These six characteristics are: 1) exchange of value, i.e., goods and services, 2) consumption of goods and services, 3) choice that allows the satisfaction of physical and psychological needs, 4) free flow of information, 5) engagement and involvement of as many people as possible, and 6) inclusion of the same people in the marketing and democratic processes. Quelch and Jocz review several interrelationships in part two: 1) marketing and politics, 2) marketing and the media, 3) marketing and programs, and 4) marketing and nations. Marketing and programs is by far the weakest of the four interrelationships under study in part two. The examination of the interrelationships of both politics and the media with marketing probably represents the most interesting section of ¿Greater Good.¿ To summarize, Quelch and Jocz make an original contribution to leveraging both marketing and democracy toward a greater good.