Greater Than One

Greater Than One

4.0 1
by Dwele
     
 
Each Dwele album should have greater, Maxwell-level anticipation. The singer should headline over the majority of contemporary R&B stars instead of open for Maze. (That's not a knock on Maze.) It's not like Dwele isn't in a comfortable spot, though. His releases routinely debut in the Top Ten of the

Overview

Each Dwele album should have greater, Maxwell-level anticipation. The singer should headline over the majority of contemporary R&B stars instead of open for Maze. (That's not a knock on Maze.) It's not like Dwele isn't in a comfortable spot, though. His releases routinely debut in the Top Ten of the R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart, and he's allowed to continue recording with no detectable creative restrictions, as heard on Greater Than One. Once he got deep into the making of this, his fifth album, he noticed a pervasive "'80s" feel. In this case, '80s often means the sophisticated type of R&B-jazz hybrids -- the mellow grooves -- actively played on Detroit stations like WJZZ during the earlier part of that decade. While that has always been part of Dwele's sound, it's a little more pronounced here; there are instances where he could easily slip into some Pieces of a Dream or, given the continued presence of his brother Antwan on trumpet, anything featuring Seawind's Jerry Hey. On "This Love," produced by Prince "BlkMagic" Damons, the sound shifts from 1980/1981 to 1982/1983-style midtempo boogie with chunky synthesizer bass, and a little high-pitched wriggle. There's some electro-funk bounce to "Patrick Ronald" (long for a certain brand of tequila, featuring Monica Blaire, one of album's several Detroit guest stars) and "Special," too. If anything, the album is looser, more relaxed and mischievous, than any Dwele album that preceded it, which is saying something. The majority of the songwriting, as usual, concerns adventures in mature bachelorhood and courtship. Dwele continues to appeal to both female and male listeners -- no pandering, no forced masculinity to be heard.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/28/2012
Label:
Ent. One Music
UPC:
0099923243427
catalogNumber:
2434
Rank:
66849

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Dwele   Primary Artist
Mike City   Background Vocals
Angel Burgess   Vocals
Krazy   Guitar
Antwan Gardner   Trombone
Louis "Styx" Newsom   Drums
Sydni Jones   Vocals
Zakiya Cogborn   Vocals

Technical Credits

Mike City   Arranger,Producer
Angel Burgess   Composer
Dwele   Producer
Raheem DeVaughn   Composer
Ron Estill   Executive Producer
Timothy Maynor   Executive Producer
Monica Blaire   Composer
Hanif Sumner   Publicity
Chris Herche   Marketing
Giovanna Melchiorre   Publicity
C. Cross   Composer
Prince "BlkMagic" Damons   Composer,Producer
REK   Producer
Antwan Gardner   Composer
G1   Producer
Brendan Laessa   Marketing

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Greater Than One 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Earshot78 More than 1 year ago
Some Dwele fans may have found it a bit difficult to grasp the concept of his fourth album W.ant W.orld W.omen, yet he still managed to convey the conceptual ideas clearly. Stylistically it may have boggled some fans including myself, however I felt it was one his freshest discs I've heard from him to date. "Greater Than One" frames Dwele in the neo-soul world perfectly, returning to his unique brand of Detroit crooning with just a slight variant in technique and production. Bringing in his brother as co-producer, the two polish off the more soul oriented tracks, while borrowing sound qualities from the 80's era of soul/jazz. It's cool subtle nuances like this that can enhance the artist's unique sound, instead of disturbing it.