Greatest Hits: The Evidence

Greatest Hits: The Evidence

by Ice-T
     
 

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A year before N.W.A. assaulted the airwaves with their seminal record Straight Outta Compton, Ice-T dropped his debut disc, Rhyme Pays, and heralded the arrival of gangsta rap. Since then, with the multi-platinum success of artists such as DrSee more details below

Overview

A year before N.W.A. assaulted the airwaves with their seminal record Straight Outta Compton, Ice-T dropped his debut disc, Rhyme Pays, and heralded the arrival of gangsta rap. Since then, with the multi-platinum success of artists such as Dr. Dre, Snoop Dog, and Tupac Shakur, G-rap has become the hip-hop norm. So it's only fitting that the original gangster, Ice-T, returns with a greatest-hits album that caters to fans of hip-hop's golden era in the late 80s and early 90s (and wisely excludes tracks from his controversial foray into thrash-metal rap with the group Body Count). With his laid-back drawl, pimp gear, and his pressed and curled mane, Ice-T paints a vivid portrait of life in the dope game on tracks such as "High Rollers" and "New Jack Hustler." Underlying the playa glitz and glam, however, are rhymes that hope for a better way. On the Curtis Mayfield-inspired "I'm Your Pusher," music is T's drug of choice, and on "Colors," the title song from the provocative 1988 film, he pleads for the end of gang violence. With all the raw hits assembled here, Ice-T -- who has achieved even greater success as an actor in films such as New Jack City and Trespass -- reminds hard-rap enthusiasts what's been missing from the recent incarnations of gangsta rap: a strong conscience. Ryan Crosby

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
A year before N.W.A. assaulted the airwaves with their seminal record Straight Outta Compton, Ice-T dropped his debut disc, Rhyme Pays, and heralded the arrival of gangsta rap. Since then, with the multi-platinum success of artists such as Dr. Dre, Snoop Dog, and Tupac Shakur, G-rap has become the hip-hop norm. So it's only fitting that the original gangster, Ice-T, returns with a greatest-hits album that caters to fans of hip-hop's golden era in the late 80s and early 90s (and wisely excludes tracks from his controversial foray into thrash-metal rap with the group Body Count). With his laid-back drawl, pimp gear, and his pressed and curled mane, Ice-T paints a vivid portrait of life in the dope game on tracks such as "High Rollers" and "New Jack Hustler." Underlying the playa glitz and glam, however, are rhymes that hope for a better way. On the Curtis Mayfield-inspired "I'm Your Pusher," music is T's drug of choice, and on "Colors," the title song from the provocative 1988 film, he pleads for the end of gang violence. With all the raw hits assembled here, Ice-T -- who has achieved even greater success as an actor in films such as New Jack City and Trespass -- reminds hard-rap enthusiasts what's been missing from the recent incarnations of gangsta rap: a strong conscience. Ryan Crosby
All Music Guide - Luke Forrest
Ice-T, the self-proclaimed "original gangster," put together a long career marked by both consistency and innovation. This 16-track compilation, put together by Ice-T himself, covers 14 years, seven albums, and the title themes for two films (Colors and New Jack City), but fortunately concentrates primarily on the first five years of his career, when he was at his productive peak. Two more recent songs on this release were not previously domestically available, a U.K. remix of "The Lane," which doesn't add anything to the original, and the unreleased track "Money, Power, Women." Both are decent but should have been left off in favor of older, better classics. Fairly informative liner notes describe the creative process behind each song and each album from Ice-T's perspective. Most of the singles and recognizable songs are included here, with the mysterious exception of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Infamous" and "Gotta Lotta Love," which honored the gang truce in the wake of the L.A. riots. Also excluded are memorably risqué songs, such as "Girls L.G.B.N.A.F." and "Girl Tried to Kill Me," and some of Ice-T's more adventurous collaborations, including Body Count, the forerunner to Limp Bizkit and other rap-metal groups. These exceptions are peripheral, however, and the meat of his career is included here.

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/08/2000
Label:
Atomic Pop
UPC:
0750564001127
catalogNumber:
11
Rank:
51887

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Ice-T   Primary Artist

Technical Credits

DJ Aladdin   Composer
Ice-T   Composer

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