Greedy Apostrophe: A Cautionary Tale

Greedy Apostrophe: A Cautionary Tale

by Ethan Long
     
 
It's the moment all the punctuation marks have been eagerly awaiting: assignment time. There are plenty of open positions for apostrophes as contractions. Soon there's only one job left-for a possessive-and only one apostrophe to fill it: none other than Greedy Apostrophe. It's not long before his greed gets out of hand, and he jumps into signs where he doesn't belong

Overview

It's the moment all the punctuation marks have been eagerly awaiting: assignment time. There are plenty of open positions for apostrophes as contractions. Soon there's only one job left-for a possessive-and only one apostrophe to fill it: none other than Greedy Apostrophe. It's not long before his greed gets out of hand, and he jumps into signs where he doesn't belong. What will it take to put Greedy Apostrophe back in his place? This clever and zany language arts picture book will have kids eager to learn the tricks of using an apostrophe.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 1-3
In this zany tale of a problem with some apostrophes, the Director of Punctuation, an austere-looking felt-tip marker, calls all the punctuation marks to order at their job-assignment meeting. Of all those present, only Greedy Apostrophe refuses to recite the Punctuation Oath. Disaster strikes when he is given the last assignment-to show possession. He "was always getting in trouble with possession!" Though he listens to the explanation of appropriate usage, he runs amok when he enters the store, misapplying apostrophes to signs for puppets ("puppet's"), marbles ("marble's"), and yo-yos ("yo-yo's") and confusing the customers. Clever children at the school across the street quickly spot the mistakes, but Greedy Apostrophe eludes them and remains at large. The expressions on Long's bright and quirky punctuation people will delight early elementary listeners. The book incorporates clearer explanations and a wider array of apostrophe use than Moira Rose Donahue's Alfie the Apostrophe (Albert Whitman, 2006).
—Jayne DamronCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
It's not easy to explain the rules of punctuation in a clear and concise manner, but Carr and Long have succeeded not only in explaining the use of the apostrophe, but also in making this punctuation mark into the main character in a witty story. Greedy Apostrophe wants to get into the action all the time, inserting himself into words when he doesn't belong, especially in plural nouns. The clever text explains some fairly complex punctuation rules in a humorous way that certainly beats any boring grammar workbook. Cartoon-style illustrations in bright citrus shades help get the punctuation points across effectively, with Greedy's mistaken entries highlighted in his trademark red. Elementary-school teachers will want to give Greedy Apostrophe a gold star for his efforts, for it's a rare teaching tool that conveys its lessons while being funny as well. (Picture book. 6-11)
From the Publisher
In this zany tale of a problem with some apostrophes, the Director of Punctuation, an austere-looking felt-tip marker, calls all the punctuation marks to order at their job-assignment meeting. Of all those present, only Greedy Apostrophe refuses to recite the Punctuation Oath. Disaster strikes when he is given the last assignment-to show possession. He "was always getting in trouble with possession!" Though he listens to the explanation of appropriate usage, he runs amok when he enters the store, misapplying apostrophes to signs for puppets ("puppet's"), marbles ("marble's"), and yo-yos ("yo-yo's") and confusing the customers. Clever children at the school across the street quickly spot the mistakes, but Greedy Apostrophe eludes them and remains at large. The expressions on Long's bright and quirky punctuation people will delight early elementary listeners. The book incorporates clearer explanations and a wider array of apostrophe use than Moira Rose Donahue's Alfie the Apostrophe (Albert Whitman, 2006).Grade 1-3.

Grade 2-3–Gibbons's view of our solar system may no longer be valid, but she's really focusing her attention so far beyond local space that the damage is minor. Between an opening description of the Milky Way and a closing claim that galaxy formation is still going on, the author depicts ancient astronomers at work, describes several kinds of telescopes, and profiles five distinctive galactic forms, from irregular to lenticular. Pairing brief, matter-of-fact generalizations leavened with digestible doses of specific information to painted scenes that link diverse groups of human observers to galaxies seen in blobby, broadly brushed portraits, this introduction to some of the universe's largest structures will put stars in the eyes of the most Earthbound young readers.–John Peters, New York Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823420063
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
04/28/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Jan Carr has written several books for adults and children including "Frozen Noses" & "Splish, Splash, Spring," & "Swine Divine," illustrated by Robert Bender, Dark Day, Light Night, illustrated by James Ransome, and The Nature of the Best, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. In springtime, she especially loves to bring home big, fragrant bunches of lilacs and to smell the earthy scent in the air. She lives with her family in New York City.

Ethan Long is an illustrator and cartoonist. "School Library Journal" described his illustrations for "Oh Yeah!" by Tom Birdseye as "bursting with energy" and "deliciously menacing". He lives with his family in Florida.

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