Greek Literature and the Roman Empire: The Politics of Imitation

Greek Literature and the Roman Empire: The Politics of Imitation

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by Tim Whitmarsh
     
 

Greek Literature and the Roman Empire uses up-to-date literary and cultural theory to make a major and original contribution to the appreciation of Greek literature written under the Roman Empire during the second century CE (the so-called 'Second Sophistic'). The central preoccupations of this literature, particularly mimesis and paideia, constitute a crucial… See more details below

Overview

Greek Literature and the Roman Empire uses up-to-date literary and cultural theory to make a major and original contribution to the appreciation of Greek literature written under the Roman Empire during the second century CE (the so-called 'Second Sophistic'). The central preoccupations of this literature, particularly mimesis and paideia, constitute a crucial test-site for the exploration and dissemination of Greek identity during the period. Focusing upon a series of key texts by important authors (including Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch, Philostratus, Lucian, Favorinus, and the novelists), Whitmarsh argues that the recurrent narratives that stage Greekness as 'culture' and Romanness as 'power' are not innocent reflections of social realities, but self-interested and often playful 'performances' of cultural identity. Their authors' rich and complex engagement with the literary past articulates an ingenious and sophisticated response to their present socio-political circumstances. This book is written for those interested in the history of identity and imperialism as well as scholars as classical literature and society. All Greek and Latin is translated.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199271375
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
03/28/2004
Pages:
392
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 5.40(h) x 1.00(d)

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Table of Contents

Abbreviations
Introduction
Pt. 1The Politics of Imitation
1Repetition: The Crisis of Posterity41
2Education: Strategies of Self-Making90
Pt. 2Greece and Rome
3Rome Uncivilized: Exile and the Kingdom133
4Civilizing Rome: Greek Pedagogy and the Roman Emperor181
5Satirizing Rome: Lucian247
Conclusion295
App. 1Translation of Favorinus, On Exile (P. Vat. 11)302
App. 2The Performative Context of Dio's Kingship orations325
References366
Index of Greek Words371
General Index372

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