The Greeks: A Portrait of Self and Others [NOOK Book]

Overview

Who were the Classical Greeks? This is not an original question, but in this book it is given an original and challenging answer. Paul Cartledge examines the Greeks in terms of their self-image, mainly as it was presented by the supposedly objective historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

The Greeks were the inventors of history as we understand it, just as they are our cultural ancestors in so many other ways. Yet their ...
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The Greeks: A Portrait of Self and Others

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Overview

Who were the Classical Greeks? This is not an original question, but in this book it is given an original and challenging answer. Paul Cartledge examines the Greeks in terms of their self-image, mainly as it was presented by the supposedly objective historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

The Greeks were the inventors of history as we understand it, just as they are our cultural ancestors in so many other ways. Yet their historiography remained rooted in myth, and the mental and material context of many of their inventions for which we rightly treasure the Greek achievement - especially democracy, philosophy, and theatre, as well as history - was often deeply alien to our own ways of thinking and acting.

The aim of The Greeks is to probe fully that achievement, principally using a typical Greek mode of conceptualization: polarity or binary opposition. The book explores in depth how the dominant - adult, male, citizen - Greeks sought, with limited success, to define themselves unambiguously in polar opposition to a whole series of 'Others' - non-Greeks, women, non-citizens, slaves, and gods. - ;Who were the Classical Greeks? This is not an original question, but in this book it is given an original and challenging answer. Paul Cartledge examines the Greeks in terms of their self-image, mainly as it was presented by the supposedly objective historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

The Greeks were the inventors of history as we understand it, just as they are our cultural ancestors in so many other ways. Yet their historiography remained rooted in myth, and the mental and material context of many of their inventions for which we rightly treasure the Greek achievement - especially democracy, philosophy, and theatre, as well as history - was often deeply alien to our own ways of thinking and acting.

The aim of The Greeks is to probe fully that achievement, principally using a typical Greek mode of conceptualization: polarity or binary opposition. The book explores in depth how the dominant - adult, male, citizen - Greeks sought, with limited success, to define themselves unambiguously in polar opposition to a whole series of 'Others' - non-Greeks, women, non-citizens, slaves, and gods. -
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Very helpful in updating the study of ancient Greece in line with modern issues and perspectives. Quite accessible to students as well as provocative to scholars."--Dirk T.D. Held, Connecticut College

"To the advanced student with a good grounding in the subject, it can be warmly recommended as a source of new insights and new approaches, and it can also be recommended to the student of other manifestations of ialtérité in search of Classical material for comparisons."--Bryn Mawr Classical Review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780191577833
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, UK
  • Publication date: 9/9/1993
  • Series: OPUS
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 3 MB

Table of Contents

Map 1. Hellas: The Greek World c.400 BCE
Map 2. The Aegean Heartland
Chronological Reference Points
Abbreviations
Illustrations
Prologue 1
1 Significant Others: Us v. Them 8
2 Inventing the Past: History v. Myth 18
Entr'acte: Others in Images and Images of Others 36
3 Alien Wisdom: Greeks v. Barbarians 51
4 Engendering History: Men v. Women 78
5 In the Club: Citizens v. Aliens 105
6 Of Inhuman Bondage: Free v. Slave 133
7 Knowing Your Place: Gods v. Mortals 167
Epilogue 191
Afterword to the Second Edition (2001) 199
Further Reading 203
Bibliography 220
Index 253
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