The Green Woman

The Green Woman

4.5 2
by Peter Straub, John Bolton, Michael Easton
     
 

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New York Times best-selling author Peter Straub resurrects his most sinister creation, Fielding “Fee” Bandolier, the unstoppable serial killer last seen in Straub’s bestseller The Throat. Aging and tired of a life devoted to death, Fee is preparing to end his long career of bloodshed. Bob Steele is a disillusioned New York detective out for

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Overview

New York Times best-selling author Peter Straub resurrects his most sinister creation, Fielding “Fee” Bandolier, the unstoppable serial killer last seen in Straub’s bestseller The Throat. Aging and tired of a life devoted to death, Fee is preparing to end his long career of bloodshed. Bob Steele is a disillusioned New York detective out for redemption and to him redemption means a one-man crusade to stop Fielding Bandolier. Steele’s father cruelly named him after a Hollywood cowboy hero. The name has been a curse because Bob has very little hero in him. But he’s going to give it one last try. Cop and killer fi nally face off in a mysterious midwestern pub, “The Green Woman Tavern.” And in that abandoned place, an unspeakable evil stronger than either of them lies waiting to seal the fates of both men.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
First the good news: Bolton’s painted artwork for veteran horror novelist Straub’s first (co-written) graphic novel is as uncanny as it’s supposed to be--richly textured, vertiginous, built around creepily mottled flesh tones and images whose terrors always seem to be bubbling up from their darkest hues. In places, his characters are so obviously drawn from photographs the book might as well be fumetti, but Bolton’s feverish super-realism gives it a hallucinatory tone. Unfortunately, the story (by Straub and Easton, who’s best known as an actor) is a straight-to-video erotic thriller with supernatural elements, alternately banal and incomprehensible. An addendum to Straub’s 1988–1993 Blue Rose trilogy of prose novels, it involves serial killer “Fee” Bandolier reflecting on his formative experiences as his final destiny intertwines with that of a weary but sexually irresistible detective named Bob Steele. There’s a lot of gruesome Vietnam imagery, a number of central-casting stereotypes, a modicum of purple prose, and several pretty young women in various states of undress and intactness. The book’s jumbled chronology and conflation of heavy symbolism with actual plot points do it no favors. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"Peter Straub has written some of the most beautiful, disturbing and poetic horror of the last century. It's a delight to see him turn his attention to graphic novels. Chilling and haunting."
                                —Neil Gaiman

"John Bolton is a god and Straub and Easton write about evil like it was their own invention.
Let The Green Woman sink its claws into you."

 — Robert Rodriguez, director of Sin City and Machete 

"Peter Straub is a living legend and John Bolton remains one of the great comics illustrators of our generation. Together with Michael Easton, these masters weave a beautifully macabre tale. A must read for horror fans."

— Steve Niles, writer, 30 Days of Night, Freaks of the Heartland  

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401211004
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
10/12/2010
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
10.66(w) x 11.80(h) x 0.51(d)

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