Grieving: A Beginner's Guide

Grieving: A Beginner's Guide

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by Jerusha Hull McCormack
     
 

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There is no sure route through grieving. Jerusha McCormack provides instead a series of signposts by which we may find our own path to a new life. "We are all amateurs at grief," she writes, "it comes to us all; we must all go through it. To treat grief as a problem to be fixed, or (worse still) to medicalize it, is to rob us of the extraordinary

Overview


There is no sure route through grieving. Jerusha McCormack provides instead a series of signposts by which we may find our own path to a new life. "We are all amateurs at grief," she writes, "it comes to us all; we must all go through it. To treat grief as a problem to be fixed, or (worse still) to medicalize it, is to rob us of the extraordinary privilege of encountering this experience on our terms: for each of us has our own way of grieving, and each of us has something special to learn from the process."

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Your Rights as a Person in Grief o You have a right to remain silent.
o You have a right to cry, anytime and anywhere.
o You have a right to express you grief in ways that seem appropriate to you.
o You have a right to talk about your dead spouse/child/sibling/parent/friend as often as you would wish and on whatever occasions you wish to do so.
o You have a right to negotiate for time out from the usual schedules and obligations, so that you may honor your grief and heal.
o You have a right to complete your grieving in your own time and in your own way, without being subject to the "schedules ' and expectations of others.,
o You have a right to assert the centrality of the experience of grieving, within your own life and as it affects the lives of others. Jerusha Hull McCormack Health June 5, 2006

Working from the theory that "it takes one to know one," McCormack - widowed while her children were still young-writes a clear-eyed account of the many emotions and situations a grieving person may encounter.

She covers so much ground in such a little book that the reader could devour it quickly in hours or spend weeks reading it slowly, savoring each bit of wisdom.

Anyone who is grieving or anyone who knows a grieving person will find hope and support in this small book.

Publishers Weekly January 20, 2006

Publishers Weekly
Working from the theory that "it takes one to know one," McCormack-widowed while her children were still young-writes a clear-eyed account of the many emotions and situations a grieving person may encounter. By her own admission, this book is "less a consolatory piece than a tour guide," and what a guide it is. An Anglican layperson and visiting professor at Beijing University, McCormack writes straight from the heart in simple language infused with a spirituality that is never preachy or pushy. She covers so much ground in such a little book that the reader could devour it quickly in hours or spend weeks reading it slowly, savoring each bit of wisdom. People suffering from loss will especially appreciate the counterpoint she provides to all the well-meaning but insensitive "churchy" things Christians tend to say to people who are grieving ("it's God's will," or "it's all for the best"). But more importantly, McCormack includes a chapter of "Guidelines for Spirit Guardians," offering advice to those who accompany grieving people so they can be fully present and helpful. Anyone who is grieving or anyone who knows a grieving person will find hope and support in this small book. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557254931
Publisher:
Paraclete Press
Publication date:
02/28/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
136
Sales rank:
775,160
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.04(h) x 0.39(d)

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Grieving: A Beginner's Guide 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
davidisaacson More than 1 year ago
There is no one right way to grieve but this book provides many useful suggestions. The author speaks from her mind as well as her heart, exploring feelings many of the recently bereaved will recognize. This book can't take the place of a loving friend or an empathetic counselor but it does offer significant consolation.