Grinderman [Explicit Lyrics]

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Mark Schwartz
It's hard for a band to revisit their past glories, but miraculously, Nick Cave and the core of his Bad Seeds band roll back the years most convincingly with Grinderman. After decades of string sections, songs in Portuguese, fiction writing, soundtrack work, and other signs of musical "maturity," Cave, Martyn Casey, Warren Ellis, and Jim Sclavunos strip away the affectations to reveal a scabrous, twitching garage band. There's more than a casual resemblance to Cave's original outfit, the Birthday Party, what with Casey's steel beam of a bass, Cave's rudimental guitar thrashing, and his hyperactive yelping about sex and murder. But Grinderman also benefits from the ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Mark Schwartz
It's hard for a band to revisit their past glories, but miraculously, Nick Cave and the core of his Bad Seeds band roll back the years most convincingly with Grinderman. After decades of string sections, songs in Portuguese, fiction writing, soundtrack work, and other signs of musical "maturity," Cave, Martyn Casey, Warren Ellis, and Jim Sclavunos strip away the affectations to reveal a scabrous, twitching garage band. There's more than a casual resemblance to Cave's original outfit, the Birthday Party, what with Casey's steel beam of a bass, Cave's rudimental guitar thrashing, and his hyperactive yelping about sex and murder. But Grinderman also benefits from the wisdom of the Bad Seeds' experience, most notably on the haunting "Man in the Moon," where Cave croons and Sclavunos sets aside his brutalized drum kit for a few minutes on xylophone. "Electric Alice" is another sophisticated number, deriving its nearly trip-hop textures from Ellis's screeching viola, another hallmark of latter-day Seeds. "I Don't Need You to Set Me Free" is a polished bit of darkness "Every time I see you, I get sick," Cave yowls, with a funky bass line and a guitar solo, but it's adenoidal howling and feedback that win the day here. Breaking for the moment from the archness of their Bad Seeds personae, Cave and company let in some air, though not any more light, on this refreshingly direct and masterfully executed set.
All Music Guide - Thom Jurek
After the epic proportions of Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus double-disc in which Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds laid out two sides of the songwriter's melodic and ambitious look at both rock & roll and balladry, Grinderman sounds like a wild, nasty, wooly rock & roll monolith who simply need to let it rip and then see what happens. Along with Warren Ellis, Martyn P. Casey and Jim Sclavunos right, 3/7 of the Bad Seeds, Cave and company turn in a squalling, raucous, twist-and-turn garage band set that takes on all comers. Check out the opening line of the single "No Pussy Blues" for clues as to why the songwriting screenwriter and seriously B-grade actor may be doing this -- the sounds of a typewriter plunking only to be joined by a Sclavunos' hi hat before Cave prattles in spoken word with real menace: "My face is finished, my body's gone, and I can't help thinking but think standing up here with all this applause and gazing down at all the young and beautiful with looking up with their questioning eyes/That I must above all things love myself..." Joined by a snarling bass, he goes on to try to woo some young woman in the crowd with all his tricks, from sucking in his gut and getting all togged up to quoting her Yeats to doing her dishes and sending her doves, but he is rejected. The wail of age is fraught with both danger and delight as he continues his desperate and unsuccessful attempt at seduction, but all he ends up with is the "no pussy blues." It adds up to two things: black humor and a love for the kind of rock & roll younger musicians have to plot, plan, pose and dig deep into their record collections to try and emulate. When the band jumps in with all the racket unleashed, the track is as tragically funny as it is unhinged. The singer's frustration is understood and empathized with to the point of sheer vitriol. And it's a careening jolt of rock & roll that would send his listeners to the volume control for more. The opening track "Get It On" is similar but even wilder: it comes bursting out of the box like a rabid wolf. Even on the slower tunes such as "Electric Alice," a story-song, the grimy organ sounds and Ellis' distorted bouzouki and violin meet the slippery mud shuffle of Sclavunos' drums and Casey's plodding, droning bassline. All of this said, there are moments here, such as on "Depth Charge Ethel" and "Honey Bee Let's Fly to Mars" where Grinderman are so freaking awesome they transcend the garage band thing altogether and sound like some flipped-out cross between Suicide, the Stooges, Bo Diddley and the Scientists. The songs come through and stand on their own amid the noise, so don't be surprised if some of these evil little nuggets get new treatments when the Bad Seeds reconvene. While the sound of pure snarl and glee is what melts the speaker cabinets the most, the overdriven menace of most these songs doesn't undermine their worth as songs. Cave is far too gifted for that and his bandmates are too empathetic to let him veer too far off course. The album closes with "Love Bomb," with Cave railing on electric guitar. It's a pumping anthem of pure male libidinal dis-ease that takes the sentiments of "No Pussy Blues" to the extreme, though Bob Dylan could have written the words. It's an anthem of male malaise, dysfunction, the rage at emasculation and desire. In fact, the protagonist in most of these songs is literally sick with it, and so is almost all of the music itself here. Grinderman, not the Bad Seeds, are the most logical -- though not necessarily similar-sounding or serious -- extension of the Birthday Party legacy Cave left behind 25 years ago. These are songs to chew on, get knocked down by, guffaw at, and take deep inside your own shadow side to celebrate. Grinderman is the impure rock & roll album to beat in 2007.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/17/2007
  • Label: Anti
  • UPC: 045778686117
  • Catalog Number: 86861
  • Sales rank: 27,353

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Grinderman Primary Artist
Nick Cave Organ, Piano, Electric Guitar, Vocals
Martyn Casey Acoustic Guitar, Bass, Background Vocals
Warren Ellis Acoustic Guitar, Viola, Background Vocals, Electric Bouzouki
James Sclavunos Percussion, Drums, Background Vocals
Technical Credits
Nick Cave Composer
Nick Launay Producer, Engineer
Dominic Morley Engineer
Matt Lawrence Engineer
Grinderman Composer
James Aparicio Digital Editing
James Sclavunos Contributor
Tim Young Mastering
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    Nick Cave returns to his Birthday Party roots with an angrier, stripped down verison of the Bad Seeds with Grinderman. Not for the faint of heart...indeed...

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews