Grizzly Seasons: Life with the Brown Bears of Kamchatka

Overview

A photographic journey that redefines perceptions of bears.

Charlie Russell and Maureen Enns spent six summers in the remote wilderness of Kamchatka, Russia: home to the world's densest population of brown bears.

Grizzly Seasons tells the story of three bear cubs — Chico, Biscuit and Rosie — rescued from a zoo and reintroduced to the wild by Russell and Enns. The account traces the bear's development from ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $3.97   
  • New (3) from $68.00   
  • Used (9) from $3.97   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$68.00
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(61)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New New as pictured-clean, excellent condition-one small corner of dustcover has a very small tear, otherwise perfect-Ships from legendary independent online bookstore in ... Murrieta, California. Thousands of satisfied customers. We ship promptly and Worldwide. We work hard to earn your confidence. Orders are fully guaranteed, includes free Tracking and Delivery Confirmation and normally ships the same business day. We use bubble wrap lined heavy Kraft envelopes. Reliable customer service and no-hassle return policy. Why pay more? Read more Show Less

Ships from: Diamond Bar, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$92.43
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(191)

Condition: New
1552978567 New. Looks like an interesting title!

Ships from: Naperville, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$155.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A photographic journey that redefines perceptions of bears.

Charlie Russell and Maureen Enns spent six summers in the remote wilderness of Kamchatka, Russia: home to the world's densest population of brown bears.

Grizzly Seasons tells the story of three bear cubs — Chico, Biscuit and Rosie — rescued from a zoo and reintroduced to the wild by Russell and Enns. The account traces the bear's development from dependant cubs to independent creatures of the wilderness.

Graced with more than 150 beautiful color photographs, including majestic aerial views, Grizzly Seasons closely follows the bears — and the authors — through six years of developing a self-sustaining, mutually-respectful relationship of trust.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

St Paul Pioneer Press - Mary Ann Grossmann
The photos of the bears are so alive, readers feel they could reach out and touch these furry giants.
E-Streams - Lara Ursin
Filled with high quality photographs... interesting insights into the lives of grizzlies and their amazingly peaceful world... a wonderfully delightful book.
Sierra - Bob Schildgen
An astounding physical intimacy with the bears... a rich collection of photographs of bears hunting, loafing, growling; close-ups reveal moods from perturbed to whimsical.
Booklist / RBB - Nancy Bent
An extremely intimate look at the life of bears... illustrated with Enn's beautiful close-up photographs... captivating.
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and - Pamela Banting
Challenge[s] our proprietary notions of subjectivity or selfhood... the text is accessible and informative, and the narrative implicit in the photographs is a tale full of wonder.
Children's Literature
The author of Spirit Bear and Grizzly Heart, and the subject of the documentary "Walking with Giants: The Grizlies of Siberia," Charlie Russell and his partner, artist Maureen Enns, spend summers in the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, among brown bears, some of which they have rehabilitated to the wilderness. The three cubs they rescued from a Russian zoo were introduced into the wild but still maintain a face-to-face relationship with Russell and Enns as evidenced by their numerous photographs which show them training the cubs to fish from a stocked pool, reclining in flowers, or taking long ambling walks along the rivers and ponds. Over the several years the two have chronicled the life of these bears, they have added others with names like Gin and Tonic, Lemon and Lime, that allow readers insight into the life of a bear. The text evokes the authors' respect and awe of the animals while close-up photographs and informative captions call forth reader emotion. One states that a cub "once picked up a dry alder leaf between two claws, rolled over on her back, and closely examined the leaf without it breaking. Grizzly heart," and the facing picture shows a human hand gently lifting the three inch long claws of a complaisant grizzly. For the pictures alone, this book is worth the price and lest the reader think living alongside bears is easy, the book ends with seven protocols for co-existence between grizzlies and humans. Given the recent mauling death of bear researcher Timothy Treadwell, author of Among Grizzlies: Living with Wild Bears in Alaska (HarperCollins, OP), this book may have a certain currency with older children, and it is a beautifully produced andphotographed contribution to our knowledge of this much maligned species. 2003, Firefly, Ages 8 to Adult.
— Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552978566
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/4/2003
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 10.60 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Charlie Russell is a renowned naturalist who has extensive experience working with grizzly bears in the wild.

Maureen Enns is an artist and photographer.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction

Discovering Kamchatka

Our First Year with the Cubs

Learning to Be Wild

Strong and Independent

A Protocol for Co-existence between Grizzlies and Humans

Acknowledgments

Read More Show Less

Preface

Introduction

I can't imagine a world without bears. For the past seven years my partner and I have been privileged enough to live for five months of the year in a remote wood-frame cabin we built in the South Kamchatka Sanctuary, Siberia. This varied and beautiful landscape is home to the world's densest concentration of brown bears, formidable creatures who travel well-worn paths through the tundra from their winter dens down to crystal-clear waters that will become rich with spawning salmon.

For myself, a naturalist and guide born on a ranch in Alberta, I've spent over forty years studying the nature of bears and our human responses to them. I have had the great fortune to have been joined in this, my life's work, by Maureen Enns, an artist and photographer. Maureen's first feelings were similar to those of most people, who feel fear and apprehension in the face of these giant, mysterious animals. But luckily, Maureen is the kind of creative, curious person who knows that understanding is the most important step towards conquering fear.

What Maureen and I felt instinctively was that bears were not as dangerous and unpredictable as their reputation suggested. We felt that a great part of the problem has been that, ever since humans became organized enough to do such things, grizzlies have been managed, almost exclusively, in a way that assumes these characteristics are absolute. In a sense, bears and people have been deliberately trained to fear each other, in order to keep them a safe distance apart. This policy has been particularly troublesome for bears, because grizzlies and humans both need the same type of productive land — and the grizzly most often loses in competition for it.

We thought it would be helpful for bears if we did a study that would question the central assumptions about them. Whatever a grizzly is up to, its actions are considered threatening to humans who encounter them. But many years of watching them had suggested to us that they might really be peaceful animals, not vicious predators. That they occasionally strike out could in fact be a result of incessant human reactions to them based on fear. It is surely true that whenever such an attack occurs it keeps paranoia simmering and reinforces the perception that bears are menacing by nature. Perhaps if bears were treated kindly, their responses to humans would be entirely different, and the cycle of violence could be broken.

Our study would differ from other biological studies, in that it would assume that these animals were intelligent and could have feelings similar to ours. Unlike scientists, we didn't feel we had to justify this approach or worry whether our findings could be viewed as objective; we would simply see where it led. Beyond pepper spray — a well-tested and nonfatal means of deterring bears —
and electric fencing, the only protection we would take with us was our combined experience and understanding of our subjects.

First, we had to find a place to conduct our study. In 1993 we began researching locations, and knew it was critical to locate a large chunk of wilderness where there were many grizzly bears that had had little, if any, contact with people. Our assumption was that all previous human contact with grizzlies, world-over, would have been in some way negative for the bears — we wanted to start with a clean slate. We also had to find a place where we'd be allowed to befriend them. Due to the concerns of wildlife officials, this requirement pretty well ruled out working in North America.

Coincidentally, the Soviet era had recently ended and less-populated areas of Russia were opening up to foreign visitors. Kamchatka Peninsula in the far east of Russia had been a particularly restricted place during the Cold War, due to its many military bases and its proximity to Alaska. Kamchatka was a majestic wilderness loaded with Asian brown bears, the same species as North America's grizzly, and a study based there would be applicable to bears at home in Canada, as well as to bears in Alaska and the rest of the United States. In the summer of 1994, we ventured into the area to scout it out. While the Russian authorities had many well-defined and negative pre-conceptions concerning the questions we were asking about bears, we nevertheless managed, after a year and a half of negotiations, to secure permission to work in their country.

Kambalnoye Lake, where we've lived for the past seven summers, is at the very bottom end of the peninsula, in the South Kamchatka Sanctuary, and is one of the last great wildernesses in the world. We have never fully understood why we have been tolerated by our Russian hosts as long as we have in this strange and distant country, but the seventh year of our study has proven more enlightening than we had ever dared to hope.

We came to understand that the bears in our study area, whom we hoped would be innocent, in actuality had had encounters with poachers over the years, so they were very fearful of us at first. But they soon began to relax when they saw that we were not overly interfering with their lives. We never allowed ourselves to make mistakes, such as letting them into our food, because living well together required being hassle-free both ways.

In our second year in Russia, our project became meaningful in a whole new way: we were able to rescue three very small orphaned cubs from a zoo and bring them to our cabin, where we looked after them until they could be on their own. Since then we have remained a part of their lives. It was the first time such rehabilitation had been done successfully, that is, without the bears becoming dangerous to humans. Our work with the cubs has been — and still is — the most critical focus of our study, and has hastened the process of our understanding the subtleties of the true nature of grizzlies.

Typically, as our study progresses, we identify more questions needing answers. For instance, having to feed our cubs when they were young meant we were led into the thorny debate surrounding the issue. It is widely assumed that "a fed bear is a dead bear," meaning that every bear that tastes human food becomes obnoxious. But we discovered it is possible to feed bears without them becoming dangerous, if it is done in a systematic and careful way. More work must be done in this area, but often bears starve from natural food failures, and hundreds could be saved by knowing how to feed them in an appropriate manner.

With the success of the cub reintroduction project, we've also recognized the importance of ensuring that the South Kamchatka
Sanctuary remains a safe habitat for bears. It's wonderful to experience the bears' openness to our presence, but unless we are able to change human attitudes, our work cannot be considered complete. Our presence in the sanctuary has discouraged much of the poaching that was happening prior to our arrival, but we worry that when we complete our project, our study animals will be vulnerable again. We've vowed not to leave before more protection is in place, and for the last four years we have worked with Kronotskiy State Preserve to develop the area's first ranger system. And to ensure the preserve has the resources to support such programs, we have funded the training of ecotourism guides in Canada, with hopes that the Russian people will learn how to capitalize on their incredible wilderness areas without destroying them.

We believe that grizzlies have been misunderstood. Our most important discovery is that grizzly bears respond very quickly and positively to being treated with respect. Once we understood the manners we needed to have, their world very suddenly opened for us. The many hundreds of hours we've spent in very close proximity to dozens of different bears, often with our backs turned to them, has shown us that grizzlies cannot be inherently dangerous and unpredictable. If they were, we simply would not have survived our first season. We have never suffered any injury beyond a few small scrat

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

I can't imagine a world without bears. For the past seven years my partner and I have been privileged enough to live for five months of the year in a remote wood-frame cabin we built in the South Kamchatka Sanctuary, Siberia. This varied and beautiful landscape is home to the world's densest concentration of brown bears, formidable creatures who travel well-worn paths through the tundra from their winter dens down to crystal-clear waters that will become rich with spawning salmon.

For myself, a naturalist and guide born on a ranch in Alberta, I've spent over forty years studying the nature of bears and our human responses to them. I have had the great fortune to have been joined in this, my life's work, by Maureen Enns, an artist and photographer. Maureen's first feelings were similar to those of most people, who feel fear and apprehension in the face of these giant, mysterious animals. But luckily, Maureen is the kind of creative, curious person who knows that understanding is the most important step towards conquering fear.

What Maureen and I felt instinctively was that bears were not as dangerous and unpredictable as their reputation suggested. We felt that a great part of the problem has been that, ever since humans became organized enough to do such things, grizzlies have been managed, almost exclusively, in a way that assumes these characteristics are absolute. In a sense, bears and people have been deliberately trained to fear each other, in order to keep them a safe distance apart. This policy has been particularly troublesome for bears, because grizzlies and humans both need the same type of productive land -- and the grizzly most often loses incompetition for it.

We thought it would be helpful for bears if we did a study that would question the central assumptions about them. Whatever a grizzly is up to, its actions are considered threatening to humans who encounter them. But many years of watching them had suggested to us that they might really be peaceful animals, not vicious predators. That they occasionally strike out could in fact be a result of incessant human reactions to them based on fear. It is surely true that whenever such an attack occurs it keeps paranoia simmering and reinforces the perception that bears are menacing by nature. Perhaps if bears were treated kindly, their responses to humans would be entirely different, and the cycle of violence could be broken.

Our study would differ from other biological studies, in that it would assume that these animals were intelligent and could have feelings similar to ours. Unlike scientists, we didn't feel we had to justify this approach or worry whether our findings could be viewed as objective; we would simply see where it led. Beyond pepper spray -- a well-tested and nonfatal means of deterring bears -- and electric fencing, the only protection we would take with us was our combined experience and understanding of our subjects.

--

First, we had to find a place to conduct our study. In 1993 we began researching locations, and knew it was critical to locate a large chunk of wilderness where there were many grizzly bears that had had little, if any, contact with people. Our assumption was that all previous human contact with grizzlies, world-over, would have been in some way negative for the bears -- we wanted to start with a clean slate. We also had to find a place where we'd be allowed to befriend them. Due to the concerns of wildlife officials, this requirement pretty well ruled out working in North America.

Coincidentally, the Soviet era had recently ended and less-populated areas of Russia were opening up to foreign visitors. Kamchatka Peninsula in the far east of Russia had been a particularly restricted place during the Cold War, due to its many military bases and its proximity to Alaska. Kamchatka was a majestic wilderness loaded with Asian brown bears, the same species as North America's grizzly, and a study based there would be applicable to bears at home in Canada, as well as to bears in Alaska and the rest of the United States. In the summer of 1994, we ventured into the area to scout it out. While the Russian authorities had many well-defined and negative pre-conceptions concerning the questions we were asking about bears, we nevertheless managed, after a year and a half of negotiations, to secure permission to work in their country.

Kambalnoye Lake, where we've lived for the past seven summers, is at the very bottom end of the peninsula, in the South Kamchatka Sanctuary, and is one of the last great wildernesses in the world. We have never fully understood why we have been tolerated by our Russian hosts as long as we have in this strange and distant country, but the seventh year of our study has proven more enlightening than we had ever dared to hope.

We came to understand that the bears in our study area, whom we hoped would be innocent, in actuality had had encounters with poachers over the years, so they were very fearful of us at first. But they soon began to relax when they saw that we were not overly interfering with their lives. We never allowed ourselves to make mistakes, such as letting them into our food, because living well together required being hassle-free both ways.

In our second year in Russia, our project became meaningful in a whole new way: we were able to rescue three very small orphaned cubs from a zoo and bring them to our cabin, where we looked after them until they could be on their own. Since then we have remained a part of their lives. It was the first time such rehabilitation had been done successfully, that is, without the bears becoming dangerous to humans. Our work with the cubs has been -- and still is -- the most critical focus of our study, and has hastened the process of our understanding the subtleties of the true nature of grizzlies.

Typically, as our study progresses, we identify more questions needing answers. For instance, having to feed our cubs when they were young meant we were led into the thorny debate surrounding the issue. It is widely assumed that "a fed bear is a dead bear," meaning that every bear that tastes human food becomes obnoxious. But we discovered it is possible to feed bears without them becoming dangerous, if it is done in a systematic and careful way. More work must be done in this area, but often bears starve from natural food failures, and hundreds could be saved by knowing how to feed them in an appropriate manner.

With the success of the cub reintroduction project, we've also recognized the importance of ensuring that the South Kamchatka Sanctuary remains a safe habitat for bears. It's wonderful to experience the bears' openness to our presence, but unless we are able to change human attitudes, our work cannot be considered complete. Our presence in the sanctuary has discouraged much of the poaching that was happening prior to our arrival, but we worry that when we complete our project, our study animals will be vulnerable again. We've vowed not to leave before more protection is in place, and for the last four years we have worked with Kronotskiy State Preserve to develop the area's first ranger system. And to ensure the preserve has the resources to support such programs, we have funded the training of ecotourism guides in Canada, with hopes that the Russian people will learn how to capitalize on their incredible wilderness areas without destroying them.

--

We believe that grizzlies have been misunderstood. Our most important discovery is that grizzly bears respond very quickly and positively to being treated with respect. Once we understood the manners we needed to have, their world very suddenly opened for us. The many hundreds of hours we've spent in very close proximity to dozens of different bears, often with our backs turned to them, has shown us that grizzlies cannot be inherently dangerous and unpredictable. If they were, we simply would not have survived our first season. We have never suffered any injury beyond a few small scratches received while playing with our cubs, and we have yet to use our pepper spray to defend ourselves.

We hope the message people get from this book is that grizzlies can be pleasant animals, with whom it is feasible for humans to be more generous and sharing in terms of land. Our photographs demonstrate what is possible under the ideal conditions we created around our cabin, but our actions should not be imitated, for the simple reason that present management policies have ensured that most bears living near populated areas have the potential to be very dangerous. No one should ever have to repeat the type of study we have done at Kambalnoye Lake, providing we have achieved our goals. Hopefully, we have revealed that there is another way to relate to these awesome animals. With luck, we've also shown that fear is the most crippling obstruction to exploration -- not only fear of the grizzly, but also fear of trying something new. The question remains whether entrenched human behavior and beliefs can change quickly enough to make a difference.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)