Grounded
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  • Grounded

Grounded

3.8 30
by Kate Klise
     
 

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After her brother, sister, and father die in a plane crash, Daralynn Oakland receives 237 dolls from well-wishers, resulting in her nickname: Dolly. But dolls are little comfort to a twelve-year-old girl whose world is rocked by the dramatic changes in her life, including her angry, grieving mother's new job as a hairstylist at the local funeral home.

Dolly

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Overview

After her brother, sister, and father die in a plane crash, Daralynn Oakland receives 237 dolls from well-wishers, resulting in her nickname: Dolly. But dolls are little comfort to a twelve-year-old girl whose world is rocked by the dramatic changes in her life, including her angry, grieving mother's new job as a hairstylist at the local funeral home.

Dolly gets a job, too, where she accidentally invents a fashionable new haircut. But in Grounded by Kate Klise, her real work begins when a crematorium comes to town, and someone has to save a dying business, solve a burning mystery, and resuscitate the broken hearts in Digginsville, Missouri, population 402.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Klise (the 43 Old Cemetery Road series) spins an insightful story about loss and family, set in the tiny town of Digginsville, Mo., told from the plainspoken perspective of 12-year-old Daralynn Oakland. Her brother, sister, and father die in a plane crash, leaving her with her brusque mother, who refuses help or sympathy, and her senile grandmother. Her mother keeps herself busy with a new job as a hairstylist at the local funeral home, while Daralynn is stuck at home, eating frozen dinners ("After the grief casseroles tapered off, Mother lost the will to cook"), examining her life B.C. (Before the Crash) and A.D. (After the Deaths), and recording letters to her siblings and father in her Pertinent Facts & Important Information book. When the mysterious Mr. Clem opens a crematorium nearby and steals the heart of Daralynn's vivacious Aunt Josie, it poses a threat to the funeral home's business, and the town. Balancing Daralynn's family tragedy with gentle humor and an evocative late-1960s setting, Klise's writing is refreshingly matter-of-fact and studded with simple, powerful images and memorable, entertaining characters. Ages 9–13. (Nov.)
From the Publisher

“This improbably lighthearted mystery, told from Daralynn's entertainingly candid perspective, deals with death and its aftermath in a straightforward style that puts the ‘fun back in funeral.'” —Horn Book Magazine

“Klise (the 43 Old Cemetery Road series) spins an insightful story about loss and family, set in the tiny town of Digginsville, Mo., told from the plainspoken perspective of 12-year-old Daralynn Oakland. ...Balancing Daralynn's family tragedy with gentle humor and an evocative late-1960s setting, Klise's writing is refreshingly matter-of-fact and studded with simple, powerful images and memorable, entertaining characters.” —Publishers Weekly

“In the sentimental end, this salty-sweet, nut-sprinkled novel underscores the ‘grounding' that comes with caring for people, whether it's flashy-trashy Aunt Josie and her boardinghouse gentlemen, senile Mamaw poignantly nurturing her dolls or, most powerfully of all, Daralynn and her mother finding their way back to each other.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This quiet story illuminates and celebrates the human need for connection beyond the grave.” —Booklist

“While her subject matter is serious, author Kate Klise brings humor and warmth to this heartfelt story of healing and hope.” —BookPage

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
Daralynn Oakland , a sixth grader, survives a tragic airplane crash because her mother grounded her. The plane crash kills her father, younger brother and younger sister and this opening sets the stage for Daralynn and her mother to cope with this tragedy. Daralynn's mother becomes angry; Josie, Daralynn's aunt pours out her feelings and Daralynn's grandmother becomes very childlike. In order to support herself, Daralynn's mother begins styling hair at a beauty salon. Daralynn, in between earning money in a small spot of her mother's salon and running errands, tries to come to terms with the huge loss. She decides that people need to put "the fun back in funeral" and have a living funeral so one can hear good things and celebrate before dying. This business almost dies before it can begin to flourish as Josie and her new boyfriend, Clem, open a crematorium. However, Clem's crematorium does not quite ring true to Daralynn and she begins to investigate Clem and his new venture. This mystery gets handled a bit too swiftly and almost too late in the story. However, this part does not diminish the relationships between the characters. Daralynn's voice gives an opportunity for humor to shine through the gloom of the deaths and the anger that Daralynn's mother uses to cope. The inclusion of small newspaper clippings and letters adds a nice bit of authenticity to Daralynn's insights. The pace of the story also highlights in a subtle way that loss and deep emotions can take time for a person to handle. Female middle school readers may appreciate this novel most but anyone who feels a bit outcast or needs to learn about coping can enjoy this story. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—When her father, older brother, and young sister died in a plane crash, Daralynn was at home, grounded for having been out fishing without her parents' permission. Her mother opens a beauty salon in their small Missouri town (population 402) and also prepares the hair of the deceased at the local funeral home. Clem Monroe suddenly appears on the scene, selling prepaid cremation plans to unsuspecting seniors and wooing Daralynn's Aunt Josie. She and many other residents are taken in by his schemes, giving him cash for a business that will never come to fruition. When Daralynn realizes that Clem is telling lies and acting suspiciously around town, she uses her journal to tell her father and siblings about the events, and the mystery is wrapped up in a unique way. The relationship between Daralynn and her mother, neither of whom has really dealt with her grief, is portrayed sensibly and tenderly. The fringe characters also shine; Clem is a slick con man, and Aunt Josie, free-spirited and kindhearted, understands Daralynn's prickly, hostile mother. The title of the book is serendipitous in many ways, and will leave readers with much to think about.—Alison Donnelly, Collinsville Memorial Public Library, IL
Kirkus Reviews
In 12-year-old Daralynn's world of '60s TV dinners and Perry Mason, "B.C." marks the time before the small-plane crash that killed her father, brother and sister, and "A.D." is "After the Deaths." Daralynn's mother hardens her heart after the tragedy, and her pragmatic daughter does her darndest to follow suit. The small-town–Missouri story—despite all the corpses, funerals and cremations—is not so much about death as about coping with grief. Lively, comical details, described in Daralynn's matter-of-fact first-person voice, keep the story buoyant, such as when Daralynn mistakes a girl for a boy at her mother's hair salon and gives her a Marlon Brando–inspired haircut she hastily dubs "Le Frenchie," and when she infers the town's new crematorium will be an ice-cream parlor. In the sentimental end, this salty-sweet, nut-sprinkled novel underscores the "grounding" that comes with caring for people, whether it's flashy-trashy Aunt Josie and her boardinghouse gentlemen, senile Mamaw poignantly nurturing her dolls or, most powerfully of all, Daralynn and her mother finding their way back to each other. (Historical fiction. 10-14)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312570392
Publisher:
Feiwel & Friends
Publication date:
11/09/2010
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
950,223
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile:
720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

Meet the Author

KATE KLISE is the author of the 43 Old Cemetery Road series (Dying to Meet You and Over My Dead Body) of epistolary novels, illustrated by her sister, M. Sarah Klise, as well as the picture book Shall I Knit You a Hat? (Holt). Her standalone fiction includes Deliver Us from Normal, which School Library Journal praised as "a superb psychological novel." She lives in Norwood, Missouri.

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Grounded 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Jeffrey Baird More than 1 year ago
Kate Klise has a mastery of writing for children.
harry brochinsky More than 1 year ago
This is a must read book for kids 3rd grade and up
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked the the sample because l like sad stories and this was sad and intersting at the same time!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is AMAZING i think u shold read this book because it is really interesting and the first couple words of the book make you want to read it more and more its a amazibg book and i hope you people looking at my review take in my advice and READ THUS BOOK!!!!!!!!! !+!+!+!+!+!+!+!+!+!+!+!=AWESOME BOOK
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got a letter from Kate Klise today, she gave me a sneak peek of "43 Old Cemetary Road" book 7!!!!!!! Omgosh I love her books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kate Klise is an excellent writer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How many pages...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story was intereging but it was also kinda boring but it was an okay book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was amaz!! I LOVE KATE! SHE HAS SO MANY GOOD BOOKS!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was about death and it was really sad and not that hooking. Not my favorite.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read it!!!! Kate klise is such ann excellent author, and all of her books r good 2!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kate Klise is the best author ever. Please read this book. It is totally worth 9.99.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was sad and i dont like sad books but overall is a good book!
Lori Blaylock More than 1 year ago
I love kate klise she is a good writer for me .im a kid and i live tgose books
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George Kvasnicka More than 1 year ago
best book ever
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