Overview

What Does It Mean To Grow Up Chicana/o?

When I was growing up, I never read anything in school by anyone who had a "Z" in their last name. This anthology is, in many ways, a public gift to that child who was always searching for herself whithin the pages of a book.
from the Introduction by Tiffany Ana Lopez

Louie The Foot Gonzalez tells of an eighty-nine-year-old woman with ...

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Growing Up Chicana/o

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Overview

What Does It Mean To Grow Up Chicana/o?

When I was growing up, I never read anything in school by anyone who had a "Z" in their last name. This anthology is, in many ways, a public gift to that child who was always searching for herself whithin the pages of a book.
from the Introduction by Tiffany Ana Lopez

Louie The Foot Gonzalez tells of an eighty-nine-year-old woman with only one tooth who did strange and magical healings...
Her name was Dona Tona and she was never taken seriously until someone got sick and sent for her. She'd always show up, even if she had to drag herself, and she stayed as long as needed. Dona Tona didn't seem to mind that after she had helped them, they ridiculed her ways.

Rosa Elena Yzquierdo remembers when homemade tortillas and homespun wisdom went hand-in-hand...
As children we watched our abuelas lovingly make tortillas. In my own grandmother's kitchen, it was an opportunity for me to ask questions within the safety of that warm room...and the conversation carried resonance far beyond the kitchen...

Sandra Cisneros remembers growing up in Chicago...
Teachers thought if you were poor and Mexican you didn't have anything to say. Now I know, "We've got to tell our own history...making communication happen between cultures."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061763526
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/17/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 412 KB

Meet the Author

Bill Adler is the editor of four New York Times bestselling books, including The Kennedy Wit, and is also the president of Bill Adler Books, Inc., a New York literary agency whose clients have included Mike Wallace, Dan Rather, President George W. Bush, Bob Dole, Larry King, and Nancy Reagan.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2003

    A Great Book...

    My favorite story was 'Sister Katherine', because of the magnitude of Sister Katherine's transition from mean to nice. She used to be extremely antipatica (mean)! that is, until she fell in love with another nun. 'Dona Tona of 19th Street' is about a woman whose house was destroyed. She stood in foont of the wrecking block, and was killed instantly. People thought her ghost was a witch. One day, a girl encountered Dona Tona on the way home from school, and the ghost told her story. Another story that I like is 'The Hotel McCoy,' by Denise Chavez. A woman and her daughters took vacations in the summer, and spent time in the McCoy Hotel. They have good memories of their trips. This is a book you'll really enjoy. It's definitely worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2002

    One of the best books to teach you about the past...

    This book is great, for all Latinos that are having a hard time looking for their past and forward to their future. For all the young generation of Chicanos, Mexicanos, Latinos that have once felt an outkast to this society. This book makes you see the importance of being Latino, the struggle to have what we do now, and how well your future can be. This made me open my eyes and become a very aware person to what I am able to accomplish. Always remember that Si Se Puede!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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