Growing up Untouchable in India: A Dalit Autobiography

Growing up Untouchable in India: A Dalit Autobiography

by Vasant Moon, Gail Omvedt, Eleanor Zelliot
     
 

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'In this English translation, Moon's story is usefully framed by apparatus necessary to bring its message to even those taking their first look at South Asian culture...The result is an easy to digest short-course on what it means to be a Dalit, in the words of one notable Dalit.'-Journal of Asian Studies

Overview

'In this English translation, Moon's story is usefully framed by apparatus necessary to bring its message to even those taking their first look at South Asian culture...The result is an easy to digest short-course on what it means to be a Dalit, in the words of one notable Dalit.'-Journal of Asian Studies

Editorial Reviews

Christopher Queen
This book puts living flesh on the bones of recent Indian social historiography.
Harvard University
Library Journal
Moon is a Dalit (formerly known as untouchable) activist and editor of the speeches and writings of the late Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar, a Dalit and the architect of the Indian constitution. The emergence of Dalit literature is an important development in the Indian literary scene, and Omvedt's translation of Moon's autobiography makes this work accessible to the Western reader. Despite poverty and hunger, Moon's account of his boyhood in the Mahar "Vasti," or neighborhood, of Nagpur is idyllic. Moon portrays the solidarity among the Ambedkar loyalists of this urban slum as well as a vast array of characters who are athletic, feisty, and resourceful activists. Omvedt's translation is true to the original Marathi, but the use of a very limited English vocabulary makes her writing a stylistic curiosity. This reservation aside, the book is recommended for comparative literature and Indian collections in academic and large public libraries.--Ravi Shenoy, Naperville P.L., IL Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Times Literary Supplement (UK)
This book is a welcome first step towards increasing our understanding of a much-neglected aspect of Indian life.
Los Angeles Times
There are few such autobiographies, especially in English, which makes Moon's memories of sleeping on village roads side by side with neighbors, of his mother waking at 4:30 a.m. to work in the mill and of the kindness of certain teachers particularly valuable.
Times Literary Supplement
This book is a welcome first step towards increasing our understanding of a much-neglected aspect of Indian life.
Journal of Asian Studies
Offer(s) an accessible glimpse of the life and times of one Dalit and the people he grew up with.
Pacific Reader
His [Moon's] autobiography, written in his native Marathi and translated into English, vividly describes life in an urban Indian slum and gives a glimpse of the internal politics that accompanied the independence movement.
Race and Class
A powerful personal and collective memory of caste oppression and struggle in India from the 1930s to the 1950s. . . . Both as a historical and as a literary document, there is much to consider in this thought provoking and intensely moving memoir.
— Shalini Ramachandran
Journal Of Asian Studies
Offer(s) an accessible glimpse of the life and times of one Dalit and the people he grew up with.
Race & Class - Shalini Ramachandran
A powerful personal and collective memory of caste oppression and struggle in India from the 1930s to the 1950s. . . . Both as a historical and as a literary document, there is much to consider in this thought provoking and intensely moving memoir.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780585394060
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
07/15/2002
Series:
Asian Voices
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
File size:
8 MB

Meet the Author

Vasant Moon is a retired civil servant and Dalit activist. He is the editor of 17 volumes of Dr. AmbedkarOs writings and speeches in English. Gail Omvedt is a freelance writer and frequent visiting professor of sociology. Eleanor Zelliot is Laird Bell Professor of History emerita at Carleton College.

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