Guardian Angel House

( 2 )

Overview

Momma had always told Susan that there was no safe place for a Jew, especially in German occupied Hungary in 1944. Why then were twelve-year-old Susan and her little sister, Vera, being sent to a convent to be kept safe. Susan and her sister soon discover the true nature of courage, sheltered by a group of nuns who risk their lives to protect them. Based on true events, the Guardian Angel House was the nickname given to a convent operated by the Sisters of Charity in Budapest. The nuns there sheltered over 120 ...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.59
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$14.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $8.38   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Guardian Angel House

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$12.95 List Price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview

Momma had always told Susan that there was no safe place for a Jew, especially in German occupied Hungary in 1944. Why then were twelve-year-old Susan and her little sister, Vera, being sent to a convent to be kept safe. Susan and her sister soon discover the true nature of courage, sheltered by a group of nuns who risk their lives to protect them. Based on true events, the Guardian Angel House was the nickname given to a convent operated by the Sisters of Charity in Budapest. The nuns there sheltered over 120 Jewish children during the German invasion of Hungary, including author Kathy Clark's mother and aunt.

Kathy Clark was born in Budapest, Hungary, and moved to Canada as a young girl. She based this book on the true story of her mother and aunt after hearing their amazing story. She lives in Ontario, Canada, with her family.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Resource Links
"This books serves not only as a reminder of the inhumanity of the holocaust, but also of the strength of will of the survivors of this most horrific period of history...Highly recommended."
CM Magazine
"Clark details aspects of their daily life so that children in the target age group will be able to identify with the difficulties and unhappiness the sisters experienced...Guardian Angel House will prove to be a popular book in school libraries and for personal purchases."
TeensReadToo.com
"A thoughtful exploration of World War II from a unique perspective...Clark paints an accurate portrait of the young Jewish girls protected by the safe haven that the Catholic convent offered...Both tragic and hopeful, Clark molds non-fiction into an adventurous tale suitable for younger readers."
Canadian Jewish News
"Well told and fast paced. Young readers, especially girls, will admire the characters and find the book suspenseful and easy to understand, yet also very educational."
Children's Bookwatch
"A moving story with roots in fact, Guardian Angel House is a great way to teach young readers about the Holocaust through fiction."
Canadian Children's Book News
"Offers a glimpse of some of the many small but heroic acts of the Holocaust – and an interesting portrait of an institution that reached out across any religious barriers to save the lives of many children."
Children’s Bookwatch
"A moving story with roots in fact, Guardian Angel House is a great way to teach young readers about the Holocaust through fiction."
VOYA - Dawn Talbott
Clark tells the story of a young girl and her sister who are Jews living in Hungary during World War II in this novel. As the Nazis grow ever stronger, Susan and Vera's lives change more every day. Things become desperate after Father is sent to a work camp, and eventually the girls' mother sends them into hiding at the Guardian Angel House, a Catholic convent in Budapest. The girls fear for their family's safety as well as for their own Jewish identity when surrounded by nuns of a foreign faith. Susan discovers that friendship's ties go beyond any religion or ethnicity, and ultimately realizes that she is much braver and more valuable than she thought. This book is based on the author's aunt's true story, but it never feels like a biography. Readers identify quickly with Susan, an adolescent who doubts herself but who finds purpose and unexpected friendships in a time of strife. A gripping story unfolds as readers marvel with Susan at the life the nuns lead, feel her joy in finding ways to contribute, and share her sorrow as her life is turned upside down. Although the horror of the Nazi reign is not the book's focus, readers experience the atrocities from the young girl's point of view. The truth is not sugarcoated, nor is it graphically stated, striking a perfect balance. Clark does the true story justice in this well-written account of one family's struggle through Holocaust. Reviewer: Dawn Talbott
VOYA - Julie Watkins
Twelve-year-old Susan has been forced to sit by and watch her liberties and those of other Jews be taken away as a tidal wave of anti-Semitic hatred envelops her native Budapest. Now her father has been deported to a labor camp and rumors abound about what fate lies in store for the rest of Hungary's Jewish population. Realizing the terrible danger her family is facing, Susan's mother makes the difficult decision to send her and her younger sister Vera to the nearby Sisters of Charity convent, which is providing a safe haven for Jewish girls. Although it is a difficult adjustment, Susan and Vera are soon basking in the comfort and gentle nature of the Sisters and working hard to maintain a semblance of normalcy amidst the destruction and chaos swirling around the convent walls. The nuns endeavor to ensure that the girls maintain their religious identity, even though it differs from the Sisters' own religious convictions. The girls learn to trust others again and realize that even in the face of unspeakable evil, there are people who will risk everything to do what is right. This fictionalized dramatization of a true story is written by the real-life Vera's daughter. In addition to the story, there are historical photographs and notes throughout. It is a poignant and relatively gentle introduction to the atrocities of the Holocaust that focuses on the bravery demonstrated during one of history's darkest hours. Reviewer: Julie Watkins
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—The Sisters of Charity of the Guardian Angel Convent in Budapest saved the lives of more than 100 Jewish children during World War II. Based on the experiences of her mother and aunt, Clark provides a compelling, fictionalized account documenting the courage and compassion of these nuns. Through the connections of their mother's childhood friend, Isi, a Catholic, 12-year-old Susan and her 6-year-old sister, Vera, are taken to the convent after their father is sent to a labor camp. They join other Jewish girls in hiding and quickly adapt to their new life. Their days are filled with prayer, chores, studies, and recreation. The nuns respect Jewish traditions, allowing the girls to light the Sabbath and Hanukkah candles and to conduct a Passover Seder, but they also teach them the rites and customs of Catholicism—both out of respect and for protection. And, when Budapest is under attack, the nuns create a shelter in the crypt beneath the church, risking their own lives to protect the girls from bombs and Nazi raids. Miraculously, Susan and Vera are reunited with their parents, who survived the war through the aid of Raoul Wallenberg, and again with the help of Isi, the family immigrates to Canada. Black-and-white photographs and an afterword help to bring the story and history to life. This is a touching and heartwarming tribute to the Righteous Gentiles of the Guardian Angel House and a highly readable, accessible resource to introduce students to the Holocaust.—Rachel Kamin, North Suburban Synagogue Beth El, Highland Park, IL
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Kathy Clark based this book on the true story of her mother and aunt. She lives in Ontario, Canada with her family.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2014

    I will be reviewing the book Guardian Angel House. The author

    I will be reviewing the book Guardian Angel House. The author is Kathy Clark. She wrote this book after watching a Hungarian documentary about the nuns at the Sisters of Charity convent in Budapest and realizing these were the people who had protected her mother and aunt from the Nazis. This book is full of details about the Holocaust, and young readers would enjoy reading this.

    In 1944, Hungary had been invaded by the Nazis. Susan and her sister, Vera, was sent to a Catholic convent so they could be safe. The Sisters of Charity took care of the girls while the Nazis were invading them. Susan and Vera feel better knowing that they were not the only Jewish girls hiding in the convent. While they were not being invaded, all of the girls had chores to do. For instance, Susan was in the garden with one of the Sisters. Even though they are hiding in a safe crypt beneath the church, they were still in danger. Susan and Vera learn that the nuns risk their lives to keep the Jewish girls safe, while they were being invaded.

    Young readers would be very interested in reading Guardian Angel House. Believe it or not, this book is based on a true story. This event occurred at Budapest, Hungary. The convent was run by the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul. “I’m so glad you drew these pictures,” Mama exclaimed. “They bring your stay there to life for me. Now I don’t feel so much like I’ve missed out on a whole year of your lives.” This book compares to The Diary of Anne Frank because the Jewish girls were in the crypt of the basement when the siren went off. Also, the people in Anne Frank were in the Secret Annex hiding from Nazis. In both stories, there are conflicts with the characters.

    Guardian Angel House is a great book, full of emotions and details throughout the whole book. The emotions set in when a soldier come pounding on the door telling Papa that he is being sent to a labor camp and wouldn’t be back for a while. Susan, Vera, and Aunt Isi were on their way to the convent on Gellert Mountain. When they arrived at the convert both girls gasped as they stepped inside the ancient church. Aunt Isi gently guided the girls toward the nuns and then departed. Without Aunt Isi, Vera became more fearful amidst the strangers and tightly held on to Susan’s hand. Mother Gabriel greeted them to be at the convent with all of the sisters. Susan and Vera finally got comfortable being there with other Jewish girls. The invasion was soon over and the family came together. They noticed Aunt Isi was not there with them until they received a letter from her. Isi was in Canada with her brother’s assistance. The letter was mostly about Isi telling Mama that she was safe and that she wanted them to move over there to where she was.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Amber Gibson for TeensReadToo.com

    It is 1944 and Susan is scared. Although the war has been raging for years now, the Nazis are only now beginning to impose their ethnic cleansing ideals on Hungary. Papa always told the family that what happened in Poland, the Czech Republic, and other Nazi-occupied countries could never happen in Hungary. Even when Susan began to be ignored at school or when the grocer refused to sell food to Mama, Susan believed her father when he said everything would be okay.

    But when Papa is sent away to work in a labor camp, Susan doesn't know what to believe anymore.

    Mama wants the family to stay put - how else will Papa find them when he gets out of the camp? However, Mama's childhood friend, Aunt Isi, convinces Mama that it would be safer if, at the very least, the two girls go into hiding. There is a nearby Catholic convent that is taking in young Jewish girls and hiding them from the Nazis.

    Susan is eleven and Vera is just six. Susan promises Mama that she will take care of her little sister, but she doesn't want to leave Mama and their baby brother, Tomas, behind. Who knows how long it will be before the family is reunited?

    Luckily for Susan and Vera, the nuns at the convent are very warm and loving, welcoming the girls with open arms and willing to break the Nazi law to protect them. Susan soon makes friends with some of the other Jewish girls and begins a new life of her own, tending the vegetable garden and helping in the kitchen.

    Forced to mature beyond her years, Susan learns the true meaning of courage and discovers that Catholicism and Judaism have more in common than she could have ever imagined. Even though they are of a different faith, the nuns always treated the other girls lovingly and with respect.

    Kathy Clark's GUARDIAN ANGEL HOUSE is a thoughtful exploration of World War II from a unique perspective Clark has the advantage of retelling a true story: Susan and Vera are her aunt and mother. With the help of valuable research and a trip to the convent in Budapest, Clark paints an accurate portrait of the young Jewish girls protected by the safe haven that the Catholic convent offered.

    Both tragic and hopeful, Clark molds non-fiction into an adventurous tale suitable for younger readers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)