Guess How Much I Love You: Little Library by Sam McBratney, Anita Jeram |, Board Book | Barnes & Noble
Guess How Much I Love You (Board Book)

Guess How Much I Love You (Board Book)

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by Sam McBratney, Anita Jeram
     
 

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Now, Guess How Much I Love You, the award-winning, America Booksellers Book of the Year nominee is available as a sturdy board book for the youngest of children. Full color.

Overview

Now, Guess How Much I Love You, the award-winning, America Booksellers Book of the Year nominee is available as a sturdy board book for the youngest of children. Full color.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763618209
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
07/28/2003
Pages:
20
Age Range:
Up to 2 Years

Meet the Author

Sam McBratney wrote GUESS HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU as the fifty-seventh book of his career. He reunited with Anita Jeram for YOU'RE ALL MY FAVORITES and the GUESS HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU Storybooks. He lives in Northern Ireland.

Anita Jeram is the illustrator of GUESS HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU, the GUESS HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU Storybooks, and YOU'RE ALL MY FAVORITES, as well as Amy Hest's series about Sam and Mrs. Bear and Dick King-Smith's ALL PIGS ARE BEAUTIFUL and I LOVE GUINEA PIGS. She lives in Northern Ireland.

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Guess How Much I Love You 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
psycheKK More than 1 year ago
I remember one of my co-workers raving about how much her two little girls loved this book -- those "little girls" are now in their twenties. I wonder if they still love this book. This was another book that I put in my son's Easter basket this years. Since then, whenever anyone says "I love you" to him, he's been adding "so much". It is irresistibly cute. The last line of this book is also irresistible. Seriously, if anyone told me he loved me "right up to the moon -- and back", I'd be tempted to run away with him. "Little Nutbrown Hare" and "Big Nutbrown Hare" trip me up with every reading, and, besides my son thinks that "hare" is what is on his head, so he gets confused. He does, however, know what a rabbit is. He thinks the adorably quirky illustrations are rabbits, so that works.