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A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles
     

A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles

by Leslie Maitland, Shannon Ricketts, Jacqueline Adell
 

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In the ten years since the first edition of A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles was published, the heritage movement has gained strength, sensitizing many to the value of our architectural legacy. This new edition reflects an enriched understanding of architecture that focuses more on the visual and cultural setting of the built environment and less on

Overview

In the ten years since the first edition of A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles was published, the heritage movement has gained strength, sensitizing many to the value of our architectural legacy. This new edition reflects an enriched understanding of architecture that focuses more on the visual and cultural setting of the built environment and less on individual works seen in isolation. Today, we cherish the buildings that characterize the original "Main Street / rue Principale" - the bank building, the shops, the old hotel, the post office, the city hall. There is more recognition for older inner-city neighbourhoods, with their row housing, churches, and community halls as well as for our often romantic attachment to vernacular rural architecture. This interest in more ordinary-looking architecture marks both the democratization of Canada's heritage movement and its coming of age, for the value of these more modest structures lies in their unique ability to sustain a sense of identity.

This Guide provides an essential profile of the origins and development of the many architectural styles across Canada, from early settlement to the postmodern period, and discusses special forms such as religious, civic, domestic, commercial, and industrial design. While remaining true to the accessible format of the first edition, the second offers updated and considerably expanded text, as well as many more illustrations.

A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles, second edition is an invaluable reference tool for heritage activists and planners; university and college courses in Canadian architecture, history, and cultural resource management; and the interestedgeneral reader.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Canada is a vast country with diverse architecture, as shown in this guide by Canadian government architectural historians. The authors describe and illustrate the important architectural styles found in the nation. While most of these styles are known elsewhere, Canadians often developed their own variants; for example, a French/Scottish chateau style was popular for grand hotels built by the railway companies. The authors keep the focus on styles through brief essays and captioned black-and-white photographs. This edition, updated from the 1992 original, adds information on aboriginal building and the Modern movement. There is a helpful glossary, but the photographs are still of uneven quality, and the layout is somewhat haphazard. Libraries holding the 1992 edition will want to update, and those with a specific interest in this topic should consider. Libraries seeking a narrative with social context should select Harold Kalman's two-volume A History of Canadian Architecture or his more recent Concise History of Canadian Architecture.-David R. Conn, Surrey P.L., B.C. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551110028
Publisher:
UTP Higher Education
Publication date:
11/28/1992
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
7.24(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Shannon Ricketts is an architectural historian working with Parks Canada in Ottawa. She has researched and published on Canadian architectural history and on the history of the heritage movement in Canada.

Leslie Maitland is an architectural historian and planner with Parks Canada in Ottawa. She has published several books and articles on Canadian architectural history.

Jacqueline Hucker is an architectural historian working with Parks Canada in Ottawa.

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