Guide to the Blue Ridge Parkway

Overview


Flowing among the beautiful mountains and valleys of Virginia and North Carolina, the 469-mile-long Blue Ridge Parkway is a true American jewel. Built to expose motorists to nature as well as to preserve its beauty, the Parkway still delivers unrivaled beauty today. Guide to the Blue Ridge Parkway is filled with information useful to those traveling the Parkway and is detailed with color photographs throughout. It highlights the many significant points of interest located on and nearby the Parkway, including ...
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Guide to the Blue Ridge Parkway

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Overview


Flowing among the beautiful mountains and valleys of Virginia and North Carolina, the 469-mile-long Blue Ridge Parkway is a true American jewel. Built to expose motorists to nature as well as to preserve its beauty, the Parkway still delivers unrivaled beauty today. Guide to the Blue Ridge Parkway is filled with information useful to those traveling the Parkway and is detailed with color photographs throughout. It highlights the many significant points of interest located on and nearby the Parkway, including Mount Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi, Moses H. Cone Memorial Park, and Mabry Mill, one of the most photographed sites on the Parkway. Also noted are locations of overlooks, waterfalls, and tunnels as well as key entry and exit points along the Parkway. The guide features a brief history of the Parkway itself, a look at the surrounding geology and human history of the area, and an extensive wildflower bloom calendar. The book is organized mile-post to mile-post, appropriate for travelers who are driving the entire Blue Ridge Parkway or only a small section.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780897329088
  • Publisher: Menasha Ridge Press
  • Publication date: 8/10/2010
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 535,286
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank and Victoria Logue hiked the entire Appalachian Trail in 1988. They have returned again and again to hike its many sections on day and overnight hikes. Frank served on the Appalachian Trail Conference Board of Managers. The Logues live in Georgia where Frank works as an Episcopal priest while Victoria writes. They both enjoy sharing their love of nature with their daughter, Griffin.

Born in Florida, Nicole Blouin graduated from Appalachian State Univeristy in North Carolina, where she fell in love with the mountains. Presently, she lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and keeps busy with freelance writing, editing work, and managing a rock climbing gym.

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Read an Excerpt

The romantic notion of a road through the scenic southern Appalachian Mountains existed long before the Parkway's inception in the 1930s. Col. J. H. Pratt, who worked for the North Carolina Geologic and Economic Survey, charted such a route prior to World War I. His proposed mountain road extended from Roanoke, Virginia, through North Carolina and on to Greenville, South Carolina. He was actually able to build a short section of his road in North Carolina before the war began. The current Parkway follows sections of the colonel's old road near Altapass, North Carolina (mileposts 323 to 326).
The idea that finally reached fruition occurred to several men nearly simultaneously. When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt toured the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps of Shenandoah National Park on August 11, 1933, he responded with enthusiasm to Virginia senator Harry F. Byrd's recommendation that Skyline Drive be connected with a second scenic drive that would extend to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
In September, Byrd met with Virginia governor G. J. Pollard and Theodore E. Straus of the Public Works Administration to discuss the possibility of a parkway. The governor approved the idea of the project and appointed Byrd chairman of a Virginia committee that would expedite the project.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
A Blue Ridge Sampler: Milepost 0-105 19
American Elk 24
Agriculture along the Parkway 26
National Parks and Forests 32
White-Tailed Deer 34
Hawk Migration 38
Roanoke and the Vicinity: Milepost 105-135 47
Blight and Insects Plague Parkway Trees 50
Settlers on the Landscape: Agriculture and Rural Life: Milepost 135-292 55
Fences 60
Log Cabins 64
Mountain Ranges 66
Daniel Boone 68
Groundhog 72
Appalachian Cultural Museum 76
A House Divided 78
Grandfather and the Black Mountains: Milepost 292-380 81
Park Concessions 84
Waterfalls Along the Parkway 90
Building the Parkway Tunnels 98
The Decline of the Fraser-Fir Forests 102
Rhododendrons 106
Asheville and Vicinity: Milepost 380-390 115
Mountains-to-Sea Trail 116
High Mountain Wilderness Views: Milepost 390-469 119
Black Bear 122
Managing Views 126
Air Quality 128
Southern Appalachian Balds 130
Spring Houses 134
Appendices
Blue Ridge Parkway Bloom Calendar 139
Blue Ridge Parkway Contact Information 145
Trailsheads on the Blue Ridge Parkway 147
Milepost Tunnel Guide 150
Index 151
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