Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc.

Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc.

3.0 2
by Dwight Yoakam
     
 

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Dwight Yoakam's debut (actually an expanded version of his independent EP) brought the high-kicking spirit of Buck Owens's Bakersfield country back to the radio and rescued it from urban cowboy blandness. Yoakam's lonesome yodel is immediately memorable, and his band kicks like a liquored-up mule, thanks to Brantley Kearns's whining fiddle

Overview

Dwight Yoakam's debut (actually an expanded version of his independent EP) brought the high-kicking spirit of Buck Owens's Bakersfield country back to the radio and rescued it from urban cowboy blandness. Yoakam's lonesome yodel is immediately memorable, and his band kicks like a liquored-up mule, thanks to Brantley Kearns's whining fiddle and Pete Anderson's astounding Telecaster chops. Tunes like "Honky-Tonk Man" and "Bury Me" (a spirited duet with Maria McKee) prove that Yoakam's is a truly original voice, probably the closest thing to punk that mainstream country will ever accept. But he's no subversive; his rockabilly cover of "Ring of Fire" and Ray Price's "Heartaches by the Number" show that traditional country is in his blood. Along with Steve Earle's Guitar Town, Yoakam's Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc. is a cornerstone of what became the '90s alternative country movement. Yoakam remains a vital recording artist, and this is the first and best place to get familiar with him.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Thom Jurek
Dwight Yoakam's Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. began as an EP issued on the California Oak label. When Reprise signed him, they added four more tracks to the mix to round it out as an album. Yoakam, a Kentuckian, brought country music back into its own medium by reviving the classic Bakersfield sound with the help of his producer and lead guitarist, former Detroiter Pete Anderson. As a result, the "new traditionalist" movement was born, but Yoakam was always a cut or three above the rest, as this album displays in spades. Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. kicks off with a smoking cover of Johnny Horton's "Honky Tonk Man," a song now so closely associated with Yoakam, the original has all but been forgotten. But this is only the beginning. Yoakam's own songs such as "Bury Me," a duet with Maria McKee, and "South of Cincinnati" reference both the pastoral and dark sides of his native state. "South of Cincinnati" is a paean to those who left Kentucky for Ohio in search of jobs, and "Bury Me" celebrates the land itself. In addition, the title track, with Anderson's Don Rich-influenced guitar style, walks the Buck Owens line until the line extends to Yoakam. With fiddles and backing vocals, Yoakam's street poetry is both poignant and profound, built into a barroom anthem. In addition to this there is the gorgeous "Miner's Prayer," an acoustic number powered by dobro (courtesy of David Mansfield), flat-picked guitar, and Yoakam's singing of his grandfather and generations like him who lived and died in the mines of Kentucky. Here Bill Monroe meets Ralph Stanley meets Bob Dylan. In the grain of Yoakam's voice there isn't one hint of irony, only empathy and raw emotion. Yoakam also does a more than acceptable version of June Carter's "Ring of Fire," the "Cherokee" of country music -- meaning that if you can play it and pull it off, you're taken seriously by the veterans. The album closes with the Harlan Howard classic "Heartaches by the Number." Because of Ed Black's steel playing, Brantley Kearns' fiddle, and Anderson's guitar, the accompaniment is stronger and far edgier than the Ray Price version, but from Yoakam's throat comes an entirely different story than Price's. In Price's case the song was a plea; in Yoakam's it's a statement of fact. An astonishing debut, Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. changed the face of country music single-handedly and remains one hell of a party record.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Reprise / Wea
UPC:
0075992537223
catalogNumber:
25372
Rank:
53790

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Dwight Yoakam   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Maria McKee   Vocals,Track Performer
Gene Taylor   Piano
Pete Anderson   Bass Guitar,Electric Guitar,6-string bass
Ed Black   Pedal Steel Guitar
Glen D. Hardin   Piano
J.D. Foster   Bass,Background Vocals
Brantley Kearns   Fiddle,Background Vocals
Jay Dee Maness   Pedal Steel Guitar
David Mansfield   Dobro,Mandolin
Jerry McGee   Guitar
Stu Perry   Drums
Jeff Donavan   Drums
Robert Wilson   Bass Guitar

Technical Credits

Dwight Yoakam   Arranger,Art Direction
Pete Anderson   Arranger,Producer
Brian Levi   Engineer
Dusty Wakeman   Engineer

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Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album turned-on me on to Traditional Country music. I had always been a Rock fan (and still am), but listened to this at a friend's urging and it opened the gates to all sorts of great music I never knew existed. A classic album!