Gulliver's Travels: Into Several Remote Nations of the World

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Overview

Gulliver's Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.
The book became popular as soon as it was published. John Gay wrote in a 1726 letter to Swift that "It is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery." ...
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Gulliver's Travels

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Overview

Gulliver's Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.
The book became popular as soon as it was published. John Gay wrote in a 1726 letter to Swift that "It is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery." Since then, it has never been out of print.
Cavehill is thought to be the inspiration for the novel. When Swift was living at Lilliput Cottage near the bottom of the Limestone Road in Belfast, he imagined that the mountain resembled the shape of a sleeping giant safeguarding the city.

The voyages of an Englishman carry him to such strange places as Lilliput, where people are six inches tall; Brobdingnag, a land of giants; an island of sorcerers; and a country ruled by horses.

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What People Are Saying

George Orwell
If I had to make a list of six books which were to be preserved when all others were destroyed, I would certainly put Gulliver's Travels among them.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781494450366
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/11/2013
  • Pages: 98
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan Swift (30 November 1667 - 19 October 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.
He is remembered for works such as Gulliver's Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier's Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, and A Tale of a Tub. Swift is regarded by the Encyclopædia Britannica as the foremost prose satirist in the English language, and is less well known for his poetry. Swift originally published all of his works under pseudonyms - such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff, MB Drapier - or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire: the Horatian and Juvenalian styles.
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Chapter 1

The Author gives some account of himself and family. His first inducements to travel. He is shipwrecked, and swims for his life, gets safe on shore in the country of Lilliput, is made a prisoner, and carried up the country.

My father had a small estate in Nottinghamshire; I was the third of five sons. He sent me to Emanuel College in Cambridge at fourteen years old, where I resided three years, and applied myself close to my studies: but the charge of maintaining me (although I had a very scanty allowance) being too great for a narrow fortune, I was bound apprentice to Mr. James Bates, an eminent surgeon in London, with whom I continued four years; and my father now and then sending me small sums of money, I laid them out in learning navigation, and other parts of the mathematics, useful to those who intend to travel, as I always believed it would be some time or other my fortune to do. When I left Mr. Bates, I went down to my father; where, by the assistance of him and my uncle John, and some other relations, I got forty pounds, and a promise of thirty pounds a year to maintain me at Leyden: there I studied physic two years and seven months, knowing it would be useful in long voyages.
Soon after my return from Leyden, I was recommended, by my good master Mr. Bates, to be surgeon to the Swallow, Captain Abraham Pannell commander; with whom I continued three years and a half, making a voyage or two into the Levant, and some other parts. When I came back, I resolved to settle in London, to which Mr. Bates, my master, encouraged me, and by him I was recommended to several patients. I took part of a small house in the Old Jury; and being advised to alter my condition, I married Mrs. Mary Burton, second daughter to Mr. Edmund Burton, hosier in Newgate-street, with whom I received four hundred pounds for a portion.
But, my good master Bates dying in two years after, and I having few friends, my business began to fail; for my conscience would not suffer me to imitate the bad practice of too many among my brethren. Having therefore consulted with my wife, and some of my acquaintance, I determined to go again to sea. I was surgeon successively in two ships, and made several voyages, for six years, to the East and West-Indies, by which I got some addition to my fortune. My hours of leisure I spent in reading the best authors, ancient and modern, being always provided with a good number of books; and when I was ashore, in observing the manners and dispositions of the people, as well as learning their language, wherein I had a great facility by the strength of my memory.
The last of these voyages not proving very fortunate, I grew weary of the sea, and intended to stay at home with my wife and family. I removed from the Old Jury to Fetter-Lane, and from thence to Wapping, hoping to get business among the sailors, but it would not turn to account. After three years expectation that things would mend, I accepted an advantageous offer from Captain William Prichard, master of the Antelope, who was making a voyage to the South-Sea. We set sail from Bristol May 4, 1699, and our voyage at first was very prosperous.
It would not be proper, for some reasons, to trouble the readers with the particulars of our adventures in those seas: let it suffice to inform him, that in our passage from thence to the East-Indies, we were driven by a violent storm to the north-west of Van Diemen’s Land. By an observation, we found ourselves in the latitude of 30 degrees 2 minutes south. Twelve of our crew were dead by immoderate labour and ill food, the rest were in a very weak condition. On the fifth of November, which was the beginning of summer in those parts, the weather being very hazy, the seamen spied a rock, within half a cable’s length of the ship; but the wind was so strong, that we were driven directly upon it, and immediately split. Six of the crew, of whom I was one, having let down the boat into the sea, made a shift to get clear of the ship, and the rock. We rowed by my computation about three leagues, till we were able to work no longer, being already spent with labour while we were in the ship. We therefore trusted ourselves to the mercy of the waves, and in about half an hour the boat was overset by a sudden flurry from the north. What became of my companions in the boat, as well as of those who escaped on the rock, or were left in the vessel, I cannot tell; but conclude they were all lost. For my own part, I swam as fortune directed me, and was pushed forward by wind and tide. I often let my legs drop, and could feel no bottom: but when I was almost gone, and able to struggle no longer, I found myself within my depth; and by this time the storm was much abated. The declivity was so small, that I walked near a mile before I got to the shore, which I conjectured was about eight o’clock in the evening. I then advanced forward near half a mile, but could not discover any sign of houses or inhabitants; at least I was in so weak a condition, that I did not observe them. I was extremely tired, and with that, and the heat of the weather, and about half a pint of brandy that I drank as I left the ship, I found myself much inclined to sleep. I lay down on the grass, which was very short and soft, where I slept sounder than ever I remember to have done in my life, and, as I reckoned, above nine hours; for when I awaked, it was just day-light. I attempted to rise, but was not able to stir: for, as I happened to lie on my back, I found my arms and legs were strongly fastened on each side to the ground; and my hair, which was long and thick, tied down in the same manner. I likewise felt several slender ligatures across my body, from my armpits to my thighs. I could only look upwards; the sun began to grow hot, and the light offended my eyes. I heard a confused noise about me, but in the posture I lay, could see nothing except the sky. In a little time I felt something alive moving on my left leg, which advancing gently forward over my breast, came almost up to my chin; when bending my eyes downwards as much as I could, I perceived it to be a human creature not six inches high, with a bow and arrow in his hands, and a quiver at his back. In the mean time, I felt at least forty more of the same kind (as I conjectured) following the first. I was in the utmost astonishment, and roared so loud, that they all ran back in a fright; and some of them, as I was afterwards told, were hurt with the falls they got by leaping from my sides upon the ground. However, they soon returned, and one of them, who ventured so far as to get a full sight of my face, lifting up his hands and eyes by way of admiration, cried out in a shrill but distinct voice, Hekinah degul: the others repeated the same words several times, but I then knew not what they meant. I lay all this while, as the reader may believe, in great uneasiness: at length, struggling to get loose, I had the fortune to break the strings, and wrench out the pegs that fastened my left arm to the ground; for, by lifting it up to my face, I discovered the methods they had taken to bind me, and at the same time, with a violent pull, which gave me excessive pain, I a little loosened the strings that tied down my hair on the left side, so that I was just able to turn my head about two inches. But the creatures ran off a second time, before I could seize them; whereupon there was a great shout in a very shrill accent, and after it ceased, I heard one of them cry aloud, Tolgo phonac; when in an instant I felt above an hundred arrows discharged on my left hand, which pricked me like so many needles; and besides they shot another flight into the air, as we do bombs in Europe, whereof many, I suppose, fell on my body (though I felt them not) and some on my face, which I immediately covered with my left hand. When this sh

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Textual Note

The Text of Gulliver's Travels 1

Contemporary Criticism

Gulliver's Travels and the Grotesque Carol Abromaitis Abromaitis, Carol 337

The Importance of Gulliver's Third Voyage Robert Scott Dupree Dupree, Robert Scott 349

Gulliver the Epic "Hero" and "Great" Travel Writer: A Modern Battles the Ancients Mitchell Kalpakgian Kalpakgian, Mitchell 365

The Man Who is Not: Virtue, Politics, and Gulliver's Travels Dutton Kearney Kearney, Dutton 381

The Unity of Gulliver's Travels Douglas Lane Patey Patey, Douglas Lane 395

Jonathan Swift: The Satirist as Philosopher Peter Stanlis Stanlis, Peter 413

Contributors 433

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 470 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(187)

4 Star

(87)

3 Star

(54)

2 Star

(43)

1 Star

(99)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 472 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2010

    Not the complete ebook

    FYI, this free Google download is only Volume 2 of 2. Even though it looks like you will be getting the full book, this ebook is only the second half.

    58 out of 71 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2010

    Poor;y scanned and OCR rendition

    Too many scanning and OCR errors to read -- avoid the frustration

    26 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Good movie!

    This is different than the movie but it is way better! I rate it five out of five!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    I love it!!!!!!!!!

    This book is great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    An Unforgettable Journey

    The first time I read this novel was in high school. he story at face value can be viewed as a children's story, yet for me Swift's story dug deep and opened my eyes to a world beyond my own, and taught me to search for a sort of utopia, only one that resides within our world. Since reading Gulliver's Travel, I have gone on to college, and is now a graduate student in English Literature.I have in that period probably recommended this novel to everyone I've ever met interested in reading. It changed my life in ways I can't understand fully, but the heart and soul of Gulliver lives in me now, taking me through journeys one can only dream of.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Not a good scan

    This version was not scanned well and put nicely into a digital format. Try looking for another version of this tale.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Very nice

    Kids will like this book to read. It is a very funny book. I just got it and it is awsome! This is a good book for young alduts and senor citizons.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    Must Read

    I read this book 40 years ago and pick it up to read on my Nook because it was free, I am glad I did. Loved it better this time now that I am older and know about great writting.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2012

    Typos ? Typos. Really hard to read.

    I couldnt tell where the table of contents ended and the actual book began. Perhaps it only looks like this on my original nook?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2012

    Good ebook version

    Only difficult part was using the endnotes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2012

    Not on iPhone

    Can't change font size on iPhone 3GS or iPhone 4. Disappointed. Will have to read on laptop.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    Fun read

    It was a fun witty book. I looked at a lot if the footnotes which helped me follow the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2012

    Very Good

    I must admit, it was a very good read. Some old fashioned terms, yes, but I think (and hope) it retained all of it's wit and charm throught the years. Overall, not exactly somethingbI would let my 7-year old read (if I had one) but DEFINETLY one for the teens.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    Terriffic

    This book is great. The first 40 or so pages are just some things the author wanted to put in. If you just skip to chapter1 and ignore those, it'll be fine. The only grammar mistake was it was missing an apostrophe. And it only happens once. Great book. Reccomend it to all!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    GREAT book

    I loved it. It was really funny and clever...it's not short. So don't start it unless you have some time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    Bookworm

    Love this book! Own all four volumes. Read it sometime, it's really good. Oh, and don't mind if it's political. It mentions a lot of political stuff because Jonathan Swift (the author) was very political himself. He, in fact, wrote this story for political reasons. Just letting you know that. Oh! And Lilliput isn't as nice as they put it in the movies. The giants from Brobdingnag are better and also the Houyhynhyms from volume four.

    Well, enjoy this book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    Terrific movie

    Awesome movie

    1 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    :(

    Wierd doesnt deserve the star i gave it

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    I liked this book

    Hey if your in to a good adventure story this is the book to read. Youstart off in a easy to grasp startingjourney and then the story continues to get further out their but you see a side of the characters as we act in humanity. This is a good story full of great adventures. All i can say is poor gulliver or is he really in need of pity?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Cool

    The book is amazing and the original movie is tied well not like that jack black BS

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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