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The Guns of the South [NOOK Book]

Overview

"It is absolutely unique--without question the most fascinating Civil War novel I have ever read."
Professor James M. McPherson
Pultizer Prize-winning BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM
January 1864--General Robert E. Lee faces defeat. The Army of Northern Virginia is ragged and ill-equpped. Gettysburg has broken the back of the Confederacy and decimated its manpower.
Then, Andries Rhoodie, a strange man with an ...
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The Guns of the South

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Overview

"It is absolutely unique--without question the most fascinating Civil War novel I have ever read."
Professor James M. McPherson
Pultizer Prize-winning BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM
January 1864--General Robert E. Lee faces defeat. The Army of Northern Virginia is ragged and ill-equpped. Gettysburg has broken the back of the Confederacy and decimated its manpower.
Then, Andries Rhoodie, a strange man with an unplaceable accent, approaches Lee with an extraordinary offer. Rhoodie demonstrates an amazing rifle: Its rate of fire is incredible, its lethal efficiency breathtaking--and Rhoodie guarantees unlimited quantitites to the Confederates.
The name of the weapon is the AK-47....
Selected by the Science Fiction Book Club
A Main Selection of the Military Book Club


From the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307792358
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/20/2011
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 85,266
  • File size: 3 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 51 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2011

    Great story -- terrible eBook quality

    Story 4 stars, quality of the ebook 1 star. I have read and enjoyed this book several times, and is why I made it my first eBook purchase. I am sorely disappointed in the quality of the eBook. The number of typos, incorrect words and even incomplete sentences is absolutely ridiculous. It is clear that there was no editorial oversight whatsoever when the print book was converted to an eBook.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2008

    Great imaginative book

    This is a piece of fiction and is intended for the personal pleasure of the reader. Of course it isn't realictic- if you are looking for a historical piece of writing intended for the knowledge of the reader go find a history book. Now back to business. The Guns of The South is a very interesting book and the action mixed with military strategies are very intriguing. It gives you a better understanding of what really would have happened if the south did win the war. Contrary to popular beleif, i did not find this book to be far-fetched but I did feel that certain parts inbetween fighting and military plotting were very boring. This book is overall, however, a good one , worthy of buying and reading. If you enjoy science fiction or alternate history you will like this book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2012

    A door opens

    This was the book that first introduced me to Alternate History storytelling. A simple cover that delivers a profound message, something does not belong.

    This difference catapults the reader into a whirlwind of possibilities leaving the imagination spinning for weeks after the last page has been turned. Hearwarming characters true to their histories follow new paths that lead to fortune, ruin, and endless possibility.

    A wonderful read and a excellent first step for anyone interested in the ever elusive question: What if...?

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Alternate History

    A blast to read. Semi-thougtful escapism. Yes, it has its slow moments in the middle, but is much better than most of his novels, which tend to take off like gangbusters and then slow way down after the first few chapters and end in sort of a muddle. A good book with interesting characters drawn from actual historical records. His first "World at War" series is fun, also, but the second series wasn't that hot. Those who are offended by Turtledove's fantasized Civil War history might enjoy "The Flying Dutchmen" by Suhrer, one of the more entertaining books I have read lately

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2007

    Much more than simply an alternate history

    This novel is at once a compelling story about what might have happened if the Confederate forces had the benefit of modern firearms and ammunition and a commentary on attitudes and prejudices not only in the South of the 1860s but in the world of the 21st century. 'Guns of the South' is the prototypical 'page turner' ... read the forst 50 pages and you will not be able to put it down. Guaranteed.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2000

    an excellent idea, and not much more

    This book's main idea (the effects of putting advanced weaponry in the hands of Civil War 'frontal assault' generals) is enticing, and its development here is both believable and satisfying. The author has done his history homework, and it shows. It must be said, though, that once this original hook wears off, there is little else here to write home about. Outside of the military-strategy scenes, the plot is drastically oversimplified, and at times even silly. Worth checking out, but not a cover-to-cover winner. Skip to the battles and enjoy.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    Love this book. Wish it were still available in a better quality edition than market paperback--it would be a great gift for a 13+ year old. (Not to mention for an adult as well)

    A history teacher imagine what would happen if the Confederacy had access to twentieth-century weaponry---

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    not anonymous

    my enjoyment of the story was spoiled by the very poor quality of the text which was riddled with formatting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization errors. otherwise my rating would be probably four stars instead of one.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2011

    Enjoyable book but horrible ebook quality

    I have enjoyed this book many times, simply for its comical value of the contents. However the quality of the ebook format is atrocious. An editor REALLY needs to go through this book to fix the formatting errors, punctuation and spelling issues.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2010

    Good

    The Guns of the South was a well written novel. I would say it was one of Harry Turtledove's best works. With actual facts and realistic history points, this is a wonderful alternative history. A book of "What If" that tops them all. This is a must read for alternative history readers, history fanatics. With a good plot and believable characters, anyone would enjoy this read. CC: on my blogspot( https://bookworms-bookwormusa.blogspot.com)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2004

    The ultimate historical revisor creates another time bending success!

    It is a wonderfully written book. It is extremely accurate in its portrayal of the attitudes of the historical figures such as Abraham Lincon and Nathan Bedford Forrest. It gives a view of the bigotry of some people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    It was great

    This was one of my first books when i really started to read. I also read the second enstalment to this classic tale and find it just as good

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2003

    Decent story..less Glory

    The story ideal is a good one..'what would have happened if the South won the Civil War?'. The only drawback I could find was that there was less altenate battles leading up to story line and a lot more of politics/story line. All in all it's a good book for people that like to think about..'What if?'.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2002

    Rides like a cavalry charge

    This is a great book that explores many issues and is a blast to read. Would make a good movie.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2001

    Very Good

    I thought Guns of the South was a very good novel. I think it portrayed the generals very well. Other than Nathan Bedford Forrest.He was not the devil against blacks as depicted.He treated yankees equally bad black or white. Other than that. It held my attention. i read it in 4 days. And being only 19 years of age i think is very rare. I hope Turtledove's other books are just as good or better.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2001

    A thoughtful, fun novel.

    I try not to award five stars too often, as the rating system oversimplifies somewhat. Some of the earlier reviews, I think, miss the point. This book is not so much about the Confederate States of America winning the Civil War, it's about how the CSA becoming their own country would affect their lifestyle and policies. The plot with the advanced weaponry is, I feel, more of a means than an end; the character of Robery E. Lee is well defined and written, as is most of the dialogue; the political scenes, which a previous reviewer derided as 'a waste of time', are truly the meat of the book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2001

    Great!!!!

    This book was so awesome.I reccommend this book to anyone up for a great read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2000

    A great perspective on the people

    What I expect in an alternate history is to shed some new light on historical persons and events by considering what could have been. Harry Turtledove¿s Guns of the South fulfill that. Turtledove does this by shows how Southerners, in particular Robert E. Lee, might have behaved had the Civil War taken a sudden turn in the South¿s favor in 1864. When I was young, I sometimes talked to Confederate and Union veterans and to people who lived through that conflict in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missouri. Turtledove¿s portrayal of characters like Nate Caudell and the redneck storekeeper Liles made some of these people I knew so long ago live again. I intend to continue with his How Few Remain.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 9, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    If you like historical fiction with a dash of science fiction ye

    If you like historical fiction with a dash of science fiction yet mostly a history of what the South would be like without losing to the Union, then this book is for you.

    What I appreciated about Turtledove is how he did not make a big issue about 21st century politics from the white racists who stole a time machine and traveled to the waning days of the US Civil War.

    Not only was there a lot of emphasis on life in the trenches, military strategy of Grant and Lee, but also what the parties at Jeff Davis’s house were like, what the slaves thought (not enough on this view) and following the life of Nate Claudell and Molly Bean (a woman who dresses as a man to fight in the war, and parttime “whore”) and what they go through in all this.

    The Afrikaans want a white racist state that will ally itself with Nazi Germany in the future. They settle in to a town called Rivington (fictional) and immediately begin their reign of terror not only on the Union, but their manipulation of the men and women of the South. Pretty intense story here.

    The Afrikaans though are a bit cardboard characters; Turtledove does not build them up to any great degree. There are funny moments as when he introduces the Confederate soldiers to instant coffee and freeze-dried meals.

    The discovery of 20th century books, the way General Lee uses the information of the future to help not only his own political ends but the ends of his country are fascinating. The Afrikaans really shoot their own foot – if they were trying to create a slave state, why were they treating the Black man so badly – worse so than the Confederates were!

    Final Note: Some may bristle a bit in making the South the good guys in this story, but frankly they were really coming of age as a nation, realizing what they were doing not only with demanding slave rights but also state rights, and realizing they were part of a global economy (pretty radical in 1868!).

    The fates of Lincoln, Grant, and even Hayes are revealed. Check it out, not a bad read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2014

    Must read if u like made up history

    Wish cod give more then five stars

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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