Guns of Thunder (Faith & Freedom Trilogy #1)

Guns of Thunder (Faith & Freedom Trilogy #1)

4.0 2
by Douglas Bond
     
 
The M’Kethe clan finds itself in pre-Revolutionary War Connecticut weathering a storm of religious and political upheaval. Ian M’Kethe is forced to make a choice in the face of enormous odds, as tensions mount between the colonists and the French with their Indian allies. Forging an unlikely friendship with Watookoog, an Indian, Ian risks everything and

Overview

The M’Kethe clan finds itself in pre-Revolutionary War Connecticut weathering a storm of religious and political upheaval. Ian M’Kethe is forced to make a choice in the face of enormous odds, as tensions mount between the colonists and the French with their Indian allies. Forging an unlikely friendship with Watookoog, an Indian, Ian risks everything and gains something he thought he had lost forever.

Editorial Reviews

Joel Belz
Here comes Douglas Bond again to say that those of us who love the truth are not consigned to live lives of boredom and dullness. In Guns of Thunder, he’s got action from beginning to end. I wish I’d had this kind of book to read when I was a kid.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596380134
Publisher:
Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing
Publication date:
05/28/2007
Series:
Faith and Freedom Series
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
643,164
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Douglas Bond is the author of a number of books of historical fiction and biography. He and his wife have two daughters and four sons. Bond is an elder in the Presbyterian Church of America, a teacher, a conference speaker, and a leader of church history tours. Visit his website at www.bondbooks.net.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Guns of Thunder 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Novel_Teen_Book_Reviews More than 1 year ago
As war nears, Ian M¿Kethe is too young to go. His grandfather teaches him to hunt, along with Watookoog, an Indian, who hunts with a bow. Ian takes care of the farm by himself, growing a crop of corn and selling it to provide form his family. Although he really wants a new rifle, he makes a sacrifice and purchases a pair of spectacles for his cousin Roland instead. For the first time in ages, Roland can see clearly.

When the war arrives, Roland enlists. Ian is still too young to go. He continues to work his cornfields and take care of his family. When Roland is taken prisoner at Louisbourg, Ian in consumed with worry. Had Roland been injured? Lost his spectacles? Would the French force him to fight against his own colonials?

Now eighteen, Ian leaves his family and goes to war. But he doesn¿t get to fight. He find himself engage in manual labor, salvaging debris, moving cannons, digging trenches, and building. One day when he is gathering firewood, he is shot at. An Indian attacks him. But before the Indian can finish him off, Frenchmen take him prisoner.

This is an intriguing story of a boy¿s life during the French & Indian War. There is a lot of history packed in here, including some historical issues of faith. Overall the story was interesting as were the historical facts and Ian¿s life on the farm. I recommend this book, especially for those looking for a bit of North American history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago