Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change: An Ecological and Conservation Synthesis

Overview

Habitat loss and degradation that comes as a result of human activity is the single biggest threat to biodiversity in the world today. Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change is a groundbreaking work that brings together a wealth of information from a wide range of sources to define the ecological problems caused by landscape change and to highlight the relationships among landscape change, habitat fragmentation, and biodiversity ...

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Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change: An Ecological and Conservation Synthesis

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Overview

Habitat loss and degradation that comes as a result of human activity is the single biggest threat to biodiversity in the world today. Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change is a groundbreaking work that brings together a wealth of information from a wide range of sources to define the ecological problems caused by landscape change and to highlight the relationships among landscape change, habitat fragmentation, and biodiversity conservation. The book:

  • synthesizes a large body of information from the scientific literature
  • considers key theoretical principles for examining and predicting effects
  • examines the range of effects that can arise
  • explores ways of mitigating impacts
  • reviews approaches to studying the problem
  • discusses knowledge gaps and future areas for research and management

Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change offers a unique mix of theoretical and practical information, outlining general principles and approaches and illustrating those principles with case studies from around the world. It represents a definitive overview and synthesis on the full range of topics that fall under the widely used but often vaguely defined term "habitat fragmentation."
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Editorial Reviews

Book Review Digest
"Summarized in Book Review Digest."
Ecological Restoration
"This new book by Lindenmayer and Fischer provides a holistic clarity that is sorely needed and is a must-read for conservation biologists, landscape ecologists, and other serious students interested in what happens to (mostly wildlife) species in the face of landscape change."
Natural Areas Journal
"This book is definitely one that most natural resource managers should read and have available as a reference."
Natural Areas Journal - Roger D. Applegate

"This book is definitely one that most natural resource managers should read and have available as a reference."
Ecological Restoration - John A. Bissonnette

This new book by Lindenmayer and Fischer provides a holistic clarity that is sorely needed and is a must-read for conservation biologists, landscape ecologists, and other serious students interested in what happens to (mostly wildlife) species in the face of landscape change.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781597260213
  • Publisher: Island Press
  • Publication date: 10/6/2006
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


David B. Lindenmayer is a research professor and Joern Fischer is postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at the Australian National University in Canberra.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Preface
Chapter 1. Introduction
-Why This Book Was Written: "Disentangling" Habitat Fragmentation
-The Scope of This Book: Definitions and Key Themes
-The Structure of This Book
-How to Read This Book
-Further Reading
 
PART I. Landscape Change: An Overview
Chapter 2: How Landscapes Change
-Typical Patterns of Landscape Change
-The Nonrandom Patterns of Landscape Change and Vegetation Cover
-Dynamism in the Patterns of Vegetation Cover and Landscape Change
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 3: How Landscape Change Affects Organisms: A Conceptual Framework
-Processes Affecting the Distribution of Individual Species
-Pattern-Based Landscape Models
-The Link between Single Species and Multiple Species
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
 
PART II. The Species Perspective: Key Processes Affecting Individual Species
Chapter 4. Habitat Loss
-Clearly Defining Habitat as a Prelude to Understanding Habitat Loss
-Habitat Loss is a Deterministic Process
-Habitat Loss as a Temporal Phenomenon
-Habitat Loss and Other Threatening Processes
-Caveats
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 5. Habitat Degredation
-Case Studies of the Effects of Habitat Degredation
-Chronic Degredation and Extinction Debts
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 6. Habitat Subdivision and Habitat Isolation
-Scales of Habitat Isolation
-What Represents Isolation?
-Confounding of Habitat Loss and Habitat Isolation
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 7. Changes in the Behavior, Biology, and Interactions of Species
-Altered Behavior and Biology
-Altered Species Interactions
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 8. Synthesis: Threatening Processes for Species in Modified Landscapes
-Threatening Process and Their Interactions
-Which Species are Extinction Prone?
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
 
PART III. The Human Perspective: Landscape Patterns and Species Assemblages
Chapter 9. Land Cover Change and Patch Sizes
-Landscape Modification, Loss of Native Vegetation Cover, and Species Loss
-Vegetation Loss, Remaining Patch Size, and Species Richness
-Mechanisms Underlying Species-Area Relationships
-Equations for Species-Area Relationships
-Caveats for Species-Area Relationships
-Large Patches and Other Conservation Strategies
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 10. Deterioration of Vegetation and the Physical Environment
-Deterioration of the Physical Environment Due to Grazing and Pastoralism
-Deterioration of the Physical Environment Due to Forestry
-Deterioration of the Physical Environment Due to Firewood and Fuelwood Collection
-Interactions with Other Processes Associated with Landscape Alteration
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 11. Edge Effects
-Types of Edges and Edge Effects
-Variation in Edge Effects
-Edge Sensitivity and Extinction Proneness
-Caveats
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 12. Landscape Connectivity
-Landscape Connectivity and Other Connectivity Concepts
-Quantifying Landscape Connectivity
-Negative Effects of Reduced Landscape Connectivity
-Features Contributing to Landscape Connectivity
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 13. Nestedness and Community Assembly
-Nested Subset Theory
-Assembly Rules
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 14. The Matrix and Landscape Heterogeneity
-Ecological Roles of the Matrix
-Landscape Heterogeneity
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 15. Synthesis: Cascading Effects of Landscape Change
-Cascading Effects of Landscape Change
-Why Avoiding Regime Shifts is Important
-Other Regime Shifts
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
 
PART IV. Studying Species and Assemblages in Modified Landscapes
Chapter 16. Field-Based Approaches to Studying Species and Assemblages in Modified Landscapes
-Process-Oriented Approaches for Single Species
-Why Field Studies in Modified Landscapes Are Difficult
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 17. Desktop Approaches to Studying Species and Assemblages in Modified Landscapes
-Models and Modeling
-Landscape Indices
-Reviews
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
 
PART V. Mitigating the Negative Effects of Landscape Change on Species and Assemblages
Chapter 18. Managing Landscape Pattern to Mitigate the Decline of Species and Assemblages
-Strategy 1: Maintain and/or Restore Large and Structurally Complex Patches of Native Vegetation
-Strategy 2: Maintain and/or Restore a Matrix that is Structurally Similar to Native Vegetation
-Strategy 3: Maintain and/or Restore Buffers around Sensitive Areas'
-Strategy 4: Maintain and/or Restore Corridors and Stepping Stones
-Strategy 5: Maintain and/or Restore Landscape Heterogeneity and Capture Environmental Gradients
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 19. Managing Individual Species and Ecological Processes to Mitigate the Decline of Species and Assemblages
-Strategy 1: Maintain Key Species Interactions and Functional Diversity
-Strategy 2: Maintain and Apply Appropriate Disturbance Regimes
-Strategy 3: Maintain Species of Particular Concern
-Strategy 4: Control Aggressive, Overadundant, and Invasive Species
-Strategy 5: Minimize Ecosystem-Specific Threatening Processes
-Considering Ecosystem Trajectories
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading
Chapter 20. Guiding Principles for Mitigating the Decline of Species and Assemblages of Species
-Guiding Principles that Consider Patterns and Principles
-Putting It All Together: A Case Study from South America
-Beyond Science: Mitigating Landscape Change in the Real World
-Summary
-Links to Other Chapters
-Further Reading

 
PART VI. Synthesis
Chapter 21. Synthesis, Conclusions and Priorities for the Future
-Tackling the "Fragmentation Panchreston"
-Summary of Key Concepts and Themes
-Future Research Priorities
-Concluding Remarks
-Summary
 
References
Index
 

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