Hacking Movable Type

Hacking Movable Type

5.0 1
by Jay Allen, Brad Choate, Ben Hammersley, Matthew Haughey
     
 

Ready to push Movable Type to the max?

Movable Type, that amazingly powerful personal publishing application, is the superhero of the Internet age. But when you push, poke, stretch, and otherwise coax it into producing even more, the possibilities for your Web content are simply superlative. Roll up your sleeves and get moving—here's the first book to tell

Overview

Ready to push Movable Type to the max?

Movable Type, that amazingly powerful personal publishing application, is the superhero of the Internet age. But when you push, poke, stretch, and otherwise coax it into producing even more, the possibilities for your Web content are simply superlative. Roll up your sleeves and get moving—here's the first book to tell you how.

Discover how to do all this and more

  1. Hack the perfect installation
  2. Hack the database
  3. Play with Atom, Perl, and XML-RPC APIs
  4. Write advanced plug-ins
  5. Master dynamic publishing
  6. Hack a super-powered blog app
  7. Ban comment spam
  8. Build customized templates

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764574993
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
06/13/2005
Series:
ExtremeTech Series, #13
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Jay Allen has been hacking Movable Type since before its first public release and has deployed MT on over a billion and a half systems, give or take a few orders of magnitude. He created the first MT plugin, called MT-Search, as well as one of the most necessary plugins, MT-Blacklist. He currently resides in the ever beautiful and weird San Francisco and works at Six Apart as Product Manager for Movable Type. He spends his off hours split almost evenly between spinning true house music, recharging personal electronic devices, and trying to find his keys.

Brad Choate has been hacking Movable Type since it was first released. He is now a Six Apart software engineer where he hacks Movable Type for a living, supporting his incredibly understanding wife and three little hackers.

Ben Hammersley is an English journalist and writer, and has been using Movable Type since version 1. He lives in Florence, Italy, with his beautiful wife and three greyhounds and is currently tending his cigar and dressing gown habit with little success. He invites you to visit.

Matthew Haughey is closing in on ten years of building websites and runs the popular MetaFilter weblog as well as half a dozen smaller weblog projects. He’s been tinkering with Movable Type since the very first private alpha that his friends, Ben and Mena Trott, let him test out. He’s been hacking away at it ever since.

David Raynes got his first taste of blogs in the first half of 2002, and was running his own by summer’s end that same year. Shortly after, his first plugin, MTSearches, was released, and the rest is history. One of his most popular plugins, SubCategories, was even integrated into Movable Type as of version 3.1. David works as a software engineer in Maryland, where he lives with his wife, Jenn, and their four cats (two his and two hers): Hans, Franz, Tim, and Gizmo. Eventually the feud between Tim and Franz will be resolved and there shall be only three.

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Hacking Movable Type 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A sysadmin might specialise in various jobs. Hence we have a database sysadmin or a website sysadmin. But recently, there has been the rise of a blog sysadmin. It combines to some extent duties of the other two sysadmins. This book shows that if you want to run a blog site, and choose Movable Type, then you are basically running a database. The book offers three types. All free and open source. MySQL. PostgreSQL and SQLite. The book chooses to use MySQL when demonstrating examples. But much of these seems easily portable to the other SQLs. So if MySQL is not your game, don't let that put you off the book. The book skims quickly over the theory of relational databases, and how these are implemented in MySQL. At a higher level than the database, you access Movable Type via several APIs. Of these, the Perl API might be the most attractive, given Perl's popularity. But of all the chapters, you might want to devote the most attention to that on plug-ins. Many third parties [you?] can and have written over 100 of these. Even if you do not intend to write one, it's worth perusing what's out there on the net, just in case one fits your situation.