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Hadji Murad (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
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Hadji Murad (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

4.2 6
by Leo Tolstoy, Gitta Hammarberg (Introduction), Aylmer Maude (Translator)
 

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With the resumption of Russia's military action in Chechnya in the 1990s, Hadji Murad gains new relevance, and anyone following global terrorism today will find Tolstoy's description of the nineteenth-century war all too familiar. The work provides a wealth of information about the Caucasus and on one of the most colorful figures of the nineteenth-century

Overview

With the resumption of Russia's military action in Chechnya in the 1990s, Hadji Murad gains new relevance, and anyone following global terrorism today will find Tolstoy's description of the nineteenth-century war all too familiar. The work provides a wealth of information about the Caucasus and on one of the most colorful figures of the nineteenth-century Russo-Caucasian war, the Avar chieftan, Hadji Maurad. Changing allegiances, inter-ethnic tensions, raids on villages, inaccurately reported war casualties, grieving mothers, and even the gruesome beheadings described so vividly in Hadji Murad still occur. Rarely are they described in prose as powerful as Tolstoy's.

Leo Tolstoy was born in 1828 into Russian nobility. His start as a writer came in 1851, when he accompanied his brother to the Caucasus and spent four years in the army. His conduct on the battlefield was outstanding and in an 1851 letter (the same letter in which he first mentions Hadji Murad) he vowed to "assist with the aid of a cannon in destroying the predatory and turbulent Asiatics." He lived most of his life on the family estate he inherited, Yasnaya Polyana, south of Moscow, but at age eighty-two, he denounced his wealth and set out on the road as a poor wanderer.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760773536
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
12/22/2005
Series:
Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
374,093
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

A Russian author of novels, short stories, plays, and philosophical essays, Count Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) was born into an aristocratic family and is best known for the epic books War and Peace and Anna Karenina, regarded as two of the greatest works of Russian literature. After serving in the Crimean War, Tolstoy retired to his estate and devoted himself to writing, farming, and raising his large family. His novels and outspoken social polemics brought him world-wide fame.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 9, 1828
Date of Death:
November 20, 1910
Place of Birth:
Tula Province, Russia
Place of Death:
Astapovo, Russia
Education:
Privately educated by French and German tutors; attended the University of Kazan, 1844-47

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Hadji Murad 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tolstoy's last novel, Hadji Murad, is an accessible read that provides a framework within which to interpret not only the events of the novel but also serves to provide a framework within which one may interpret the events of one's own life. Tolstoy's Hadji Murad contains a microcosm of the inherent difficulties and the innate devotion connected with family. Further, anyone can find the power-hungry Shamil, the cutthroat Hadji Aga, and the overindulgent Tsar Nicholas among the characters in one's own living novel. Beyond the historical significance of the novel and the amazing prose of Tolstoy, the framework encasing the plight of Hadji Murad provides an amusing perspective when applied to the idiosyncrasies of daily life. After reading War and Peace and Anna Karenina, this is a fun one for Tolstoy. Enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very enjoyable. Short by Tolstoy standards but very well written and clearly helped to understand the conflict that still exists.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago