The Hadrian Memorandum

( 18 )

Overview

John Barron was once a top detective in the Los Angeles Police Department’s elite 5-2 Squad. A deadly shootout with fellow officers changed his world forever.

Taking a new identity, he fled the country he loved and as Nicholas Marten became a landscape architect in the north of England determined to put a life of violence behind him forever. Then suddenly he found himself in Spain ensnared in a massive global conspiracy where he saved the life of John Henry Harris, the president...

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Overview

John Barron was once a top detective in the Los Angeles Police Department’s elite 5-2 Squad. A deadly shootout with fellow officers changed his world forever.

Taking a new identity, he fled the country he loved and as Nicholas Marten became a landscape architect in the north of England determined to put a life of violence behind him forever. Then suddenly he found himself in Spain ensnared in a massive global conspiracy where he saved the life of John Henry Harris, the president of the United States. Not long afterward the president came calling again.

Sent to the West African country of Equatorial Guinea to gain information on alleged collusion between a U.S. oil company and mercenaries hired to protect its workers, Marten is caught up in a bloody civil war between rebellious tribesmen and a merciless dictator. Soon he meets a priest who has clandestine photographs that show the mercenaries supplying arms to the rebels. In a blink the priest is captured by army troops and Marten flees for his life, determined to find the photographs and turn them over to the president before they are made public and ignite a global firestorm of protest and propaganda. But others are close on his heels. Among them; Conor White, a highly decorated former SAS commando turned elite killer; Sy Wirth, the arrogant president of the oil company; the alluring and dangerous oil company board member, Anne Tidrow; and, quietly, operatives of the CIA.

Murder, suspense, and deceit shadow Marten every inch of the way as his harrowing journey takes him to Berlin, to the Portuguese Riviera, and finally to the always-mysterious Lisbon. At stake is the struggle for control of an ocean of oil, and with it the constantly shifting line between good and evil, love and hate, law and politics. Its cost, thousands of human lives. Its cause, a top secret agreement called The Hadrian Memorandum.

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  • The Hadrian Memorandum
    The Hadrian Memorandum  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The first mystery in this abridged thriller involves the identity of the reader. The box says it’s Holter Graham, but the reader identifies himself on the disk, correctly one assumes, as Scott Sowers. Actually, Sowers’s voice, with its rat-a-tat edginess, is a better fit for a tale that is one long, breathless chase, from Central Africa to Berlin. The premise is somewhat hard to swallow: the U.S. president sends an ex-LAPD cop-turned-peace-loving British landscape artist named Nicholas Marten to find out if mercenaries in the pay of a Texas petro company have been involved in atrocities in oil-rich Equatorial Guinea. Nicholas discovers the existence of a camera memory card filled with just the sort of incriminating photos he needs. All he has to do is locate it somewhere in Europe and sidestep the mercenaries and smarmy CIA agents on his tail. With an intensity that seems genuine and a talent for assorted accents, including British, German, and Portuguese, Sowers maintains a state of suspended disbelief. Another plus is the abridgment, which gets the story told seamlessly with no strings left hanging. A Forge hardcover (Reviews, Sept. 21). (Oct.)
From the Publisher
“Folsom sets a frenetic pace from the start . . . reading this book is like watching 24.” —The Tampa Tribune

“High impact thriller writing with an almost visceral impact.”—Publishers Weekly  

“More twists and turns than a strand of DNA.”—William Peter Blatty, New York Times bestselling author of Dimiter

“With an intensity that seems genuine and a talent for assorted accents, including British, German, and Portuguese, Sowers maintains a state of suspended disbelief.” – Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765321572
  • Publisher: Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 669,155
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

ALLAN FOLSOM is the New York Times bestselling author of The Exile, The Day After Tomorrow, The Day of Confession, and The Machiavelli Covenant. He lives in Santa Barbara, California.

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Read an Excerpt

1

 

 

• West Africa. The Island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Wednesday, June 2. 4:30 P.M.

Nicholas Marten knew they were being watched. But by whom or how many, there was no way to tell. He glanced at Father Willy Dorhn, his walking companion, as if for an answer, but the tall, razor-thin, seventy-eight-year-old German-born priest said nothing. They kept on, ducking through overgrowth, crossing narrow, fast-running streams, following a dense, nearly invisible trail that snaked through the rain forest.

Now the track turned upward and they climbed higher. It was hot, easily a hundred degrees, maybe more. The humidity made it seem worse. Marten wiped sweat from his neck and forehead, then swatted at the cloud of mosquitoes that had haunted them from the start. Every piece of clothing stuck to him. The stench of plant life was overwhelming, like an intense perfume from which there was no escape. The sharp cries of tropical birds rang through the leafy, sun-blocking canopy above, far louder and more shrill than he imagined any natural sound could be. Still Father Willy, Willy as he’d asked to be called, said nothing, just continued on, walking a trail he plainly knew so well from his half century on the island that his feet seemed to make all the decisions.

Finally he spoke. “I don’t know you at all, Mr. Marten,” he said without looking at him. Spanish was the official language of Equatorial Guinea, but he used English when talking to Marten. “Soon I will have to decide if I can trust you. I hope you understand.”

“I understand,” Marten said, and they hiked on. Minutes passed, and then he heard a low, rumbling sound he couldn’t place. Little by little it intensified, drowning out the sounds of the birds and becoming very nearly a roar. Then he knew. Waterfalls! In the next seconds they rounded a bend in the trail and stopped before a cascade of falls that thundered past them in a rising mist to disappear into the jungle a thousand feet below. Willy stared at the spectacle for a long moment, then slowly turned to Marten.

“My brother told me you were coming, to expect you,” he said over the roar of the water. “Yet he has never met you. Never talked with you. So whether you are the man he told me about or someone else who has taken his place, I have no way to know.”

“All I can tell you,” Marten said, “is that I was asked to come to see you. To listen to what you have to say and then to go home. I know very little more than that, except that you think there is trouble here.”

The priest studied Marten carefully, still unsure of him. “Where is this ‘home’?”

“A city in the north of England.”

“You are American.”

“Was. I’m an expat. I carry a British passport.”

“You are a reporter.”

“A landscape architect.”

“Then why you?”

“A friend who indirectly knows your brother asked me to come.”

“What friend?”

“Another American.”

“He is a reporter.”

“No, a politician.”

Willy’s eyes found Marten’s and held there. “Whoever you are, I will have to trust you, because I fear my time is increasingly short. Besides, there is no one else.”

“You can trust me,” Marten said, and then looked around. They seemed wholly alone, yet he still had the sense they were being watched.

“They have gone,” Willy said quietly. “Fang tribesmen. Good friends. They followed us for a time until I assured them I was alright. They will make certain no one else comes.” Abruptly he reached inside his priest’s frock and took out a letter-sized envelope. He flicked it open, slid out several folded pages and held them unopened in his hand. “What do you know of Equatorial Guinea?”

“Not much. Just what I read on the plane. It’s a small, very poor country run by a dictator-president named Francisco Tiombe. In the last decade oil was discovered and—”

“Francisco Tiombe,” Willy cut him off angrily, “is the head of a brutal, ruthless family who consider themselves royal but are not. Tiombe killed the former president, his own cousin, in order to gain power and reap the riches from oil leases. And rich he is, enormously rich. He recently bought a mansion in California for forty million U.S. dollars, and that is only one of a half dozen he has around the world. The trouble is he has chosen not to share that wealth with the masses who remain poorer than poor.” Willy’s passion grew deeper.

“They have nothing, Mr. Marten. The few jobs, when they can find them, are pennies-a-day labor and selling what little food they can grow or fish they can catch. Safe drinking water is like gold and is sold as if it were. Electricity, in the villages that have it, goes on, then off. Mostly it is off. Medical facilities are laughable. Schools barely exist. For any kind of decent life at all, there is no hope.” Willy’s eyes bore into Marten. “People are angry. Violence has flared often and is getting worse. Government troops react to it with savage, repeated, unspeakable cruelty. So far it has been limited to the mainland and nothing has yet happened in Bioko, but fear is in the air everywhere and people are certain it will soon spread here. At the same time, there has been a large influx of oil workers. Most are from an American company called AG Striker. It is as if something big is happening or is about to happen, but no one knows what it is. Because of the violence, Striker has brought in mercenary soldiers from a private military company known as SimCo to protect its people and facilities.”

Suddenly Willy held up the pages he’d taken from the envelope and one by one opened them. They were color photographs printed on computer paper with an electronic date stamp in the lower right-hand corner. The first showed the main entry to a large oil exploration work area. The grounds were enclosed by a high chain-link fence topped with razor wire. Armed, uniformed men stood guard at the entry gate.

“These are local men, lucky enough to have been hired and trained to guard the compound by the mercenaries. If you look carefully”—Willy slid a thin forefinger across the photograph to pinpoint two muscular Caucasian men with buzz-cut hair, wearing tight black T-shirts, camouflage pants, and wraparound sunglasses standing in the background—“these are two of the SimCo men who trained them. Here is a computer-enhanced closer look at them.” Willy showed Marten the second page.

The two men were seen clearly. The first was big and brawny and had singularly flat ears that barely stuck out from his head. The second was thin and wiry and noticeably taller.

“I have been an amateur photographer for more than seventy years. In that time I have eagerly stayed abreast of the most current technology. My camera is digital. When the electricity comes I transfer the images to my computer and make prints like these. I have taught many in the local community about photography.”

“I don’t understand.”

“One night a young native boy asked to borrow my camera. He had done it before, and so I let him take it again. Then I became curious about what he was doing and asked him. ‘Big bird in jungle,’ he said, ‘come very early almost every day to different places. Tomorrow I know where it come.’ What kind of big bird? I asked. He said, ‘Come and see,’ and I went with him.”

Now Willy opened the third folded page. It was a photograph of a jungle-green, unmarked helicopter set down in a forest clearing at daybreak. Several men were in the doorway helping unload crates to a half-dozen natives who, in turn, were loading them into an old open-bed truck.

Willy showed Marten the next photograph. A close-up of two of the men in the helicopter doorway.

“Same men guarding the oil interests,” Marten said.

“Yes.”

Willy’s fingers slid open the next photograph: an enhanced close-up of the truck revealing supplies that had been opened for inspection. Clearly seen was a case of assault rifles, another with ammunition, another with a dozen or more three- to four-foot-long tubular pieces that looked like handheld rocket grenade launchers, and several cases of what appeared to be the rockets themselves. In the upper right-hand corner, another man, a third Caucasian in black T-shirt and camouflage fatigues, was clearly seen. He was tall with short hair and chiseled features and was a good ten years older than the first two.

“The guns are AK-47s. The natives are Fang and Bubi tribesmen involved in a growing, organized insurrection against the government. Already more than six hundred people have been killed, mostly natives but also a small number of oil people.”

“You mean the same men hired to protect the oil workers are arming a revolt against them?” Marten was astonished.

“So it seems.”

“Why?”

“It’s not for me to say, Mr. Marten. But I would assume it is the reason you have come. To find out.” Suddenly Willy took a cigarette lighter from his jacket. “I gave up smoking thirty-two years, four months, and seven days ago. The lighter still gives me comfort.” Abruptly his thumb slid over the top of it. There was a click and flame burst from its snout. Seconds later the paper photographs flared up. As quickly Willy dropped them on the ground and watched them turn to ash, then he looked to Marten.

“It’s time we go back. I have evening services.” Abruptly he turned and led Nicholas Marten back down the trail the way they had come.

Some twenty minutes later they neared the end of it. They could see the dirt road they had walked up from the village and the steeple of Willy’s small wooden church reaching over the tree line. Overhead, a monkey swung from tree limb to tree limb. Another followed. Then both stopped and looked down at the men below, chattering wildly as they did. Tropical birds screeched in reply, and for a moment the entire rain forest seemed to come alive at fever pitch. As quickly it stopped. A few seconds later heavy rain began to fall. Another thirty and it became a torrential downpour.

Then they were at trail’s end turning onto the road that had now turned to mud. For the first time since they left the cascade of falls Willy spoke.

“I trusted you, Mr. Marten, because I had to. I could not give you the photographs because there is no way to know who you might run into when we part. Hopefully, you have clear memories of what you have seen and what I have told you. Take that information with you and leave Bioko as quickly as you can. My brother is in Berlin. He is a very capable man. I hope that by the time you reach him neither he nor your American politician friend will have need for you to tell them any of this. Tell them anyway. Perhaps something can be done before it is too late. Purposeful war is being made here, Mr. Marten, for reasons I don’t know. There will be more of it, and with it will come terrible bloodshed and immense suffering. Of that I am certain.”

“Padre! Padre!” The voices of alarmed children suddenly rang out of nowhere. The men looked up to see two tribal boys, maybe ten or twelve years old, running toward them down the mud-slick road.

“Padre! Padre!” They cried out again in unison. “Padre! Padre!” At the same time the sharp crackle of automatic-weapons fire erupted from the direction of the village behind them.

“Oh Lord, no!” Willy spat loudly and started toward the children as rapidly as his aging body would take him. In the next instant an open-bed army truck filled with heavily armed troops came around a bend. A second truck was right behind it. Marten started after him on the dead run. Father Willy must have sensed what he was doing because he suddenly turned and looked back, his eyes wide with fear.

“No!” he yelled. “Go back! Tell them what you have seen! Run! Into the jungle! Run for your life!”

 

Copyright © 2009 by Allan Folsom

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Murder Memorandum

    Allan Folsom clearly went to a great deal of effort to lay out his 444 page thriller involving a big oil discovery in a corrupt African country and the people who then try to take advantage of the situation in so many ways. Photographic proof of complicity in atrocities is found, and the story revolves around the effort to get those photos to the good guys. In the meantime, multiple bad guys also want them. If you can read the book without too close an eye, you will enjoy it as Folsom is adept at covering the loyalties of the various parties as they go into battle after battle. Lots of intrigue carries the book right along, and you'll enjoy some of the geographic highlights.
    If you can't do that, well, then, there are many other books in the bin!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 6, 2012

    Highly recommended

    Fast moving and spell binding novel.It's hard not to try and read all 544 pages in one sitting. I'm looking forward to the next novel based on the Nicholas Marten character.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    IF I could download it to the Nook..........

    It says it can download to the Nook, tried twice

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  • Posted December 12, 2009

    Missed Badly

    Was looking forward to reading this book because of earlier works by Folsom. Very disappointing - too sappy - main badass allows himself to be killed because he reads of his estranged father's death in a newspaper??? The good guy gets a puppy for a gift at the end of the book?? Really should not get three stars -

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Not his best work; but still a good read!

    This is a good read for action adventure fans. I'm a big fan of his so I can say that it isn't his best work; but it is still a good read. He has a way of keeping the reader guessing and the reader will be guessing until the last word in the book. Just be ready to take the book along with you; because you'll be wanting to read what is going to happen next.

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  • Posted October 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    fans who suspend realism will enjoy this exciting thriller.

    He once was an LAPD detective, but that seems like a lifetime ago. Now he goes by the name Nicholas Marten living in England as a landscape architect with his former life of violence supposedly over. However, he made a friend for life when he saved the life of POTUS John Henry Harris (see The Machiavelli Covenant); but as he now learns a friend in need is a pest.

    President Harris asks Marten to travel to Equatorial Guinea in West Africa to determine whether native rebels trying to overthrow the harsh Tiombe dictatorship are being armed by security belonging to Texas based oil exploration firm AG Striker. In country on the Island of Bioko in the Gulf of Guinea, Marten meets septuagenarian Father Dorhn who shows him photographic proof of collusion. However, soldiers loyal to Tiombe raid the village killing the German born priest and forcing Marten on the run from the dictator's forces, the CIA, mercenaries, and the oil company as he struggles to reach Europe and allies in order to transmit information to Harris; oil brings out lethal partners as agreed upon with The Hadrian Memorandum.

    Over the top of Pico Basile, fans who appreciate an international accelerated thriller will enjoy the escapdes of Marten in sub-Saharan Africa, Berlin and Lisbon. The story line is fast-paced from the moment POTUS asks the American expat "gardener" to investigate and never slows down. Although plausibility is below the Cameroon Line geologic fault and the plot fails to look at the corrupt political-economic complex that cripples the impoverished area, fans who suspend realism will enjoy this exciting thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

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