Haiti After the Earthquake

Haiti After the Earthquake

3.8 8
by Paul Farmer
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1610390989

ISBN-13: 9781610390989

Pub. Date: 07/10/2012

Publisher: PublicAffairs

“Paul Farmer, doctor and aid worker, offers an inspiring insider’s view of the relief effort.”—Financial Times

“The book’s greatest strength lies in its depiction of the post-quake chaos… In the book’s more analytical sections the author’s diagnosis of the difficulties of reconstruction is sharp.”

Overview

“Paul Farmer, doctor and aid worker, offers an inspiring insider’s view of the relief effort.”—Financial Times

“The book’s greatest strength lies in its depiction of the post-quake chaos… In the book’s more analytical sections the author’s diagnosis of the difficulties of reconstruction is sharp.” —Economist

“A gripping, profoundly moving book, an urgent dispatch from the front by one of our finest warriors for social justice.” —Adam Hochschild

“His honest assessment of what the people trying to help Haiti did well—and where they failed—is important for anyone who cares about the country or international aid in general.” —Miami Herald

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781610390989
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
07/10/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
231,480
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

Nèg Mawon Joia S. Mukherjee ix

Writing About Suffering 1

1 The Catastrophe 6

2 Praxis and Policy: The Years before the Quake 22

3 January 12 and the Aftermath 54

4 A History of the Present Illness 121

5 Into the Camps 140

6 From Relief to Reconstruction (Building Back Better?) 149

7 Reconstruction in the Time of Cholera 188

8 Looking Forward While Looking Back: Lessons from Rwanda 236

Epilogue: January 12, 2011 236

Afterword: March 31, 2012 246

Other Voices

Art, by Catherine Bertrand Farmer 260

Women

Lòt Bò Dlo: The Other Side of the Water Edwidge Danticat 261

Sim Pa Rele (If I Don't Shout), by Michèle Montas-Dominique 271

Goudou Goudou Nancy Dorsinville 285

Mothers and Daughters of Haiti Didi Bertrand Farmer 295

Doctors

Humanitarian Aid, Impartiality, and Dirty Boots Louise Ivers 308

Lopital Jeneral Struggles to Survive Evan Lyon 319

Doctors in Tents Dubique Kobel 328

Those Who Survived Naomi Rosenberg 332

Humanitarians

First We Need Taxis Timothy T. Schwartz 342

The Official Jennie Weiss Block, O. P. 356

Building Back Better Jehane Sedky 363

Notes 373

Acronyms and Initiahsms 409

Contributors 411

Acknowledgments 415

Index 419

Photo insert between pages 216-217

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Haiti After the Earthquake 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the book about Haiti that I have been searching for. It not only describes the powerful tragedy of the quake,but the difficult history of this nation and the strength of its people.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Haiti After the Earthquake is a novel in which a person has to get past a vast political message in order to get to the real meat of the story.  This medical memoir by Paul Farmer does have its merits. Farmer was the UN Deputy Special Envoy for Haiti. He is also apparently very close to the Clintons because Bill wrote a review for the back cover of the book, and Farmer mentions Hillary Clinton many times in the book. The novel’s message of struggle is very clear. It had many very emotional examples of heroism and kindness. He also spent chapters regarding the policy involved in the mess Haiti had been before the earthquake even hit. Everyone knows that the earthquake in Haiti was devastating, but Farmer’s novel delves into the idea that the failing infrastructure of the Haitian health care system made matters worse. He explains that “healthcare does not exist in a separate universe from politics” (page 23) many times. However, he does spend some time focusing on the stories of the earthquake victims, such a man who sat all night with a complete stranger all night, comforting through her bouts of tetanus, or medical students who were homeless but continued to work while sleeping in tents. However, most of the time the tone is very clinical, with phrases such as, “As President Clinton predicted on the day of the quake, the shelter dilemma remained the ranking problem in Haiti” (Page 180). All major problems in Haiti were addressed, as well as all the proposed solutions. Farmer is very knowledgeable about this subject and clearly knows the situations he writes about. The novel could have benefited from more emotional moments. It would have helped the reader connect, and made a more personal novel. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy name-dropping and fawning over Bill Clinton, this is the book for you. For the rest of us however, I would not recommend this book. Although Farmer appears to have some interesting experiences, they are over-shadowed by his tendency to reference every organization and person he has worked with. If you are looking for a book about the Haitian earthquake and reconstruction, I would continue your search.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago