Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide [NOOK Book]

Overview

After the agony of witnessing her mother’s multiple—and ultimately successful—suicide attempts, Linda Gray Sexton, daughter of the acclaimed poet Anne Sexton, struggles with an engulfing undertow of depression. Here, with powerful, unsparing prose, Sexton conveys her urgent need to escape the legacy of suicide that consumed her family—a topic rarely explored, even today, in such poignant depth.

Linda Gray Sexton tries multiple times to kill ...
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Half in Love: Surviving the Legacy of Suicide

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Overview

After the agony of witnessing her mother’s multiple—and ultimately successful—suicide attempts, Linda Gray Sexton, daughter of the acclaimed poet Anne Sexton, struggles with an engulfing undertow of depression. Here, with powerful, unsparing prose, Sexton conveys her urgent need to escape the legacy of suicide that consumed her family—a topic rarely explored, even today, in such poignant depth.

Linda Gray Sexton tries multiple times to kill herself—even though as a daughter, sister, wife, and most importantly, a mother, she knows the pain her act would cause. But unlike her mother's story, Linda’s is ultimately one of triumph. Through the help of family, therapy, and medicine, she confronts deep-seated issues and curbs the haunting cycle of suicide she once seemed destined to inherit.
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Editorial Reviews

Maria Russo
Like her mother, Sexton can create a startling intimacy with her readers. She comes before us emotionally naked, explaining the pull of self-cutting and suicide in a tone that's unsettlingly direct, at times even ecstatic…this book looks into the workings of the suicidal mind in a way that isn't easily forgotten, raising provocative questions about how we approach and treat the severely mentally ill.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
To forge one's own life free of a parent's shadow is a challenge for any child, but when that child was born to renowned poet Anne Sexton, who committed suicide in 1974, the challenge takes on a particularly dark dimension. For Sexton, the shadow hides emotional turmoil and a legacy of mental illness passed generation to generation; despite determination to break the chain, Linda acknowledges passing it to her sons as well. With extraordinary transparency, the author intimately recalls her relationship with her unstable mother, who preened her daughter as an extension of herself before finally abandoning her. Sexton even includes an honest confession of the guilt she felt in succumbing to the legacy passed from her mother rather than ending it. The array of deep emotions here make it impossible not to sympathize with the author, and perhaps her raw account will leave the reader with an alternate legacy: the knowledge of the sometimes suicidal pain of mental illnesses and the love and care needed to overcome it. Sexton's second memoir (after Searching for Mercy Street) is a valuable examination of a dark and complicated subject. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews

Having affectingly grappled with the demons that led to her mother's suicide inSearching for Mercy Street(1994), Sexton takes on her own in this stinging chronicle of a road to three attempted suicides.

The author begins the story, and punctuates it throughout, by revisiting her mother's mental illness. Anne Sexton, the celebrated confessional poet, came from a long line of depressives. Though she may have passed a suicide gene along to her daughter, she also did much to nurture the urge, speaking to her of the voices in her head, accusing her daughter of being the one who made her sick and being altogether too confessional when it came to lovers and sex. So Sexton fille had plenty of fuel for her own depression, which was voracious and amplified by motherhood, a grim cocktail of loneliness, grief, despair, migraines, a bipolarism that swung between gloom and agitation (no euphoric highs here) and a terrible descent from mind pain to physical pain. Sexton is a dark wizard at describing her misery, which effectively turned her into a zombie, and the impulses that drove her to start cutting herself: "It's a way of letting the poison out. Taking control again...It makes the voice in my head shut up. To bleed is a way of knowing you're alive." The author provokes both scorn and sympathy, and she ably captures both the corrosive emotional storm in her head and the exhausted wariness she produces in others. Only occasionally does she overwrite—"I was ready to make music with the keyboard of my wrist"—and lose the scouring immediacy of her condition, when "[s]uicide simply came up from behind and took me in a bear hug" and she became "a mother who, as her own mother before her, had lost her grip on love."

An elucidating, caustic engagement with the author's depression.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582438658
  • Publisher: Counterpoint Press
  • Publication date: 1/10/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 750,782
  • File size: 326 KB

Meet the Author

Linda Gray Sexton is the daughter of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Anne Sexton. She has written four novels, and her first memoir, Searching for Mercy Street, was published to widespread acclaim. She lives in California.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2011

    Brave and honest.

    Linda Gray Sexton's struggle with her family legacy of depression and suicide has been no walk in the park. The daughter of poet Anne Sexton, Linda approaches this subject with bravery and grace. In her earlier memoir, "Searching for Mercy Street", she wrote of her relationship with her mother, whose successful suicide she hoped never to emulate. "Half in Love" traces her subsequent journey including several unsuccessful suicide attempts and the work it took to for her to return from these episodes and reconnect with her world and family. The author risks taking us deep into her thinking as a person wrestling with being bi-polar. She portrays suicide's seductive nature. She explains cutting in a way that makes a certain sense. Her subtle depiction of learning to feel is equally profound as her health improves. Half in Love is a brave, difficult book by a terrific writer. By honestly confronting her illness and the family members who have been hurt by it, Linda Gray Sexton saves her life. By sharing her experience, she offers readers the same opportunity.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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