Halfway Hank

Halfway Hank

5.0 2
by Joe Fallon, Jack E. Davis, Ken Scarborough, Jack E. Davis
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Halfway Hank-a boy of middling talents-lives in a house with a half-mown lawn and rides a bike with half a seat. While other kids skate figure eights, Hank can only make a figure four-wearing a single skate! Even his sister thinks he's half-baked. But one day at the Wholenut County Barbecue, Hank's partial way of doing things makes him a total winner.

Overview

Halfway Hank-a boy of middling talents-lives in a house with a half-mown lawn and rides a bike with half a seat. While other kids skate figure eights, Hank can only make a figure four-wearing a single skate! Even his sister thinks he's half-baked. But one day at the Wholenut County Barbecue, Hank's partial way of doing things makes him a total winner.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
If you think your cup is only half full, perhaps this is the book for you. The main character is a young boy who does various things in a halfway-type manner. He finds that half a boat sinks; if one only counts half of their birthdays, they are half their real age. When his sister admonishes him for his weird behavior, he tells her he is only being himself. As the story continues in its rhyming romp through half-type adventures, the reader finds that some math techniques are used to help our hero Hank win a big footrace. This is a fun read that lends itself to more discussions about fractions and their meaning in our lives. Whether you just enjoy it for the story itself or use it to illustrate some math principles, you will not soon forget Hank the Halfway Boy. 2005, HarperCollins Publishers, Ages 4 to 8.
—Barbara Youngblood
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Hank, a red-haired, freckle-faced boy, does everything halfway. He wears one skate and makes a "figure four" instead of a figure eight, his hair is combed on just one side, and he washes his face but always misses his feet. He gets along just fine until the games begin at the county barbecue, where he joins his sister's team and jeopardizes its success in several competitions. Eggs fall off the half spoon he brings to the spoon-and-egg race, his half canoe sinks, and he performs only half the steps in the square dance, causing quite a mess. By the time they reach the 100-meter dash, Demi has had it with her brother. Instead of giving up, Hank tricks himself into going the full distance by pretending he's in a 200-meter run ("-when he reached the halfway mark,/Hank passed it like a missile!/The judge was so surprised,/He blew his nose and picked his whistle") and wins first place. In the end, Hank remains true to himself and, of course, shares half the trophy with his sister. Comical cartoons complement this rhyming tale. The illustrations are filled with exaggerated faces and explode with humorous detail. The text and artwork add up to a story that is not half bad.-Melinda Piehler, Sawgrass Elementary School, Sunrise, FL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A lad gets around a predilection for doing things halfway in this jocular ditty. Hank A. Mezzomezzo's lawn is half-mown, his bedroom tidy on just one side; he wears but one skate and cuts figure fours on it. When his town's Hoe-Down Days roll around, he creates chaos in the egg race by trying to use a half-spoon, and discovers that half of a canoe just won't float. Davis supplies freckled figures with his trademark oversized, pop-eyed heads. Hank starts out with a confident look, loses his grin after a succession of misadventures, then finally regains it after figuring out that all he has to do to finish a hundred meter race (thus also appeasing his steaming big sister Demi) is to convince himself that it's a two hundred meter race. It works like a charm: "When he reached the halfway mark, / Hank passed it like a missile! / The judge was so surprised, / He blew his nose and picked his whistle." No overt moralizing here, but young readers with Hank-like habits will surely finish the whole thing. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780066236360
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/26/2005
Edition description:
Ages 4-8
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.82(w) x 11.08(h) x 1.31(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Joe Fallon lives in Los Angeles. His work in children's television, including Arthur and Little Bill, has won multiple Emmy and Peabody Awards. This is his first half book. His cup is half empty.

Jack E. Davis has illustrated two picture books by Daniel Pinkwater: The Picture of Morty and Ray and Yo-yo Man. Other books he has illustrated include the New York Times bestseller Marsupial Sue by John Lithgow. He is a recipient of the New York Society of Illustrators Gold Medal Award for Humor. He lives and paints goofy pictures in Port Townsend, Washington.

Ken Scarborough lives in New York City. He was the head writer on numerous children's television series, and he too has some awards. This is his last half book. His plate is half full.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Halfway Hank 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is adorable. My nieces are crazy about the TV show Arthur. Since the writers of this book were both head writers for the PBS' Arthur, needless it say it's a 'must have' title for their library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved this book!! It says ages 4-8 but its really good for anyone, from child to adult. THe book was funny the whole way through and such a pleasure to read. This is a must buy book!!!!!!