The Halliburton Agenda: The Politics of Oil and Money

( 4 )

Overview

The author of the bestseller The Iron Triangle untangles a web of political back scratching in one of the world's most powerful companies
Halliburton-a Texas oil-field company Dick Cheney ran before he became Vice President-has courted controversy for the better part of the twentieth century, but only recently has it received intense media scrutiny. In The Halliburton Agenda, Halliburton and its subsidiaries form the foundation of a fascinating story of influence peddling and ...
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Overview

The author of the bestseller The Iron Triangle untangles a web of political back scratching in one of the world's most powerful companies
Halliburton-a Texas oil-field company Dick Cheney ran before he became Vice President-has courted controversy for the better part of the twentieth century, but only recently has it received intense media scrutiny. In The Halliburton Agenda, Halliburton and its subsidiaries form the foundation of a fascinating story of influence peddling and behind-the-scenes political maneuvering that has only increased in momentum over the last decade-culminating in a firestorm of problems arising as soon as Cheney took office.
This intriguing book shows readers where Halliburton has been doing business and with whom-topping the list so far are Iran, Iraq, and Libya. It also reveals how this juggernaut of a corporation has engaged in a cycle of profits that begins by selling products and services to potential terrorist states, contracting with the federal government during times of war against those states, then gaining valuable rebuilding contracts to help repair those states. It will also show how a Halliburton subsidiary, Kellogg Brown & Root, has become an indispensable part of the U.S. military, so much so that the two are indistinguishable at times.
Halliburton is one of the first American companies to recognize the importance of aligning itself with powerful politicians, heavily contributing to campaigns, then cashing in on lucrative government contracts. Engaging and informative, The Halliburton Agenda carefully explores the arc of the company's success, its use of political affiliation, and the scope of its international business.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Following hard on the heels of The Iron Triangle, an examination of international consultants the Carlyle Group, Briody turns his considerable investigative skills to the rise of the Halliburton Corp., its subsidiary Kellogg, Brown and Root and the transformation of the U.S. military establishment. With a blunt matter-of-fact tone, Briody describes the rise of the two companies from the dusty oil fields of west Texas to the marbled corridors of power in Washington, D.C. Briody contends that Halliburton and KBR have literally bought politicians, manipulated the contracting process and ridden the current wave of small wars to record profits. Small, detailed moments of intense private pressure and unscrupulous backroom deal-making dominate this story. While Briody seethes with indignation, there is a grudging respect for the skill with which the executives and politicians ply their trade and a bitter resignation at the reality of the ways of government contracting. Central to the Pentagon's post-Cold War strategy is outsourcing nonmilitary tasks to private contractors. One of the chief architects of this plan was Dick Cheney, defense secretary for the first President Bush. Briody argues that with Cheney now vice-president and Halliburton awarded a huge no-bid contract to reconstruct Iraq's oil fields, public outrage has grown. As the controversy simmers, Briody raises an important question: with Americans and Iraqis dying by the day, have military matters become so efficient and profitable for companies like Halliburton that war itself is easier to wage? At times the book is repetitive and has the feel of being rushed to press, but this urgency lends the book a certain gravity. Briody has his own agenda-brilliantly illuminating the increasingly crucial nexus of public need, private profit and war making. Agent, Daniel Greenberg. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“…traces the business and political history of the company’s founders.” (Lloyd’s List, 5th November 2004)

“If you want to get your blood boiling, don’t bother sitting out in the sun. Read this book instead.” (CFO Europe, July 2004)

“…he [Briody] is a skilled story teller.” (Financial Times, 13 May 2004)

Following hard on the heels of The Iron Triangle, an examination of international consultants the Carlyle Group, Briody turns his considerable investigative skills to the rise of the Halliburton Corp., its subsidiary Kellogg, Brown and Root and the transformation of the U.S. military establishment. With a blunt matter-of-fact tone, Briody describes the rise of the two companies from the dusty oil fields of west Texas to the marbled corridors of power in Washington, D.C. Briody contends that Halliburton and KBR have literally bought politicians, manipulated the contracting process and ridden the current wave of small wars to record profits. Small, detailed moments of intense private pressure and unscrupulous backroom deal-making dominate this story. While Briody seethes with indignation, there is a grudging respect for the skill with which the executives and politicians ply their trade and a bitter resignation at the reality of the ways of government contracting. Central to the Pentagon’s post–Cold War strategy is outsourcing nonmilitary tasks to private contractors. One of the chief architects of this plan was Dick Cheney, defense secretary for the first President Bush. Briody argues that with Cheney now vice-president and Halliburton awarded a huge no-bid contract to reconstruct Iraq’s oil fields, public outrage has grown. As the controversy simmers, Briody raises an important question: with Americans and Iraqis dying by the day, have military matters become so efficient and profitable for companies like Halliburton that war itself is easier to wage? At times the book is repetitive and has the feel of being rushed to press, but this urgency lends the book a certain gravity. Briody has his own agenda—brilliantly illuminating the increasingly crucial nexus of public need, private profit and war making. Agent, Daniel Greenberg. (May) (Publishers Weekly, May 5, 2004)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471745945
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/23/2005
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 290
  • Sales rank: 645,800
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

DAN BRIODY is the author of the national bestseller The Iron Triangle: Inside the Secret World of the Carlyle Group (published by Wiley). Briody is an expert on the commingling of business and politics, particularly as it pertains to the war on terrorism and the so-called "military-industrial complex." An award-winning business journalist, Briody has written for Forbes, Wired, Red Herring, and The Industry Standard. He has also appeared as an expert in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11, and has been a guest on the Today show, The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, C-SPAN's Washington Journal, National Public Radio's Fresh Air, and a host of other television and radio programs.
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Table of Contents

Prologue.

PART I: The Early Years.

1. Erle P. Halliburton and the Million-Dollar Boast.

2. The Road to Riches.

PART II: Public Money, Private Profit.

3. The Man Behind the Dam That Built Brown & Root.

4. Guns and Butter.

5. Collateral Damage: The Leland Olds Story.

6. Our Man in Office.

PART III: From Vietnam to Iraq.

7. Vietnam and Project Rathole.

8. Empty Pockets.

9. The Big Score.

10. Backseat Cheney.

11. Fall from Grace.

Notes.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2006

    A corporate history powered by political fuel

    Author Dan Briody has written a book that goes beyond pundit finger-pointing over the controversial 'no-bid' contracts relationship between Halliburton and Vice President Dick Cheney. This is a serious examination of the high-octane blend of profit and politics that fuels the Bush administration's agenda. Briody begins with an extensive history of two Texas companies, Halliburton and Brown & Root (now KBR). He deftly portrays how they made their fortunes despite Great Depression hardships, World War II and political intrigues aplenty. Briody pulls no punches while maintaining a reportorial (if not totally objective) tone, although people who hold different political views might argue with his opinions and conclusions. We recommend this saga to anyone looking for a deeper understanding of the ongoing tryst between corporate America and its politicians. While this book is not presented as a smoking gun, it portrays insider politics that smolder like an oil fire you can't quite extinguish, leaving sort of an ugly haze.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2004

    A must read for all

    Democrat or republican, this is a must read. The author brilliantly describes power and politics.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2004

    Awesome and Inforative

    No one quite knows how corrupt a system is until someone presents solid evidence to prove it. A must read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2004

    Silly

    Republicans, Democrates, independents, etc., all use the same methods to enrich themselves; it's the American way. In general, this book implies guilt through association, but does not provide any significant facts of wrong-doing. It relies on the public's willingness to believe in conspiracy theories. Save your money, don't buy the book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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