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Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age
     

Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age

3.7 34
by William Powers
 

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“A brilliant and thoughtful handbook for the Internet age.” —Bob Woodward

“Incisive ... Refreshing ... Compelling.” —Publishers Weekly

A crisp, passionately argued answer to the question that everyone who’s grown dependent on digital devices is asking: Where’s the rest of my life?

Overview

“A brilliant and thoughtful handbook for the Internet age.” —Bob Woodward

“Incisive ... Refreshing ... Compelling.” —Publishers Weekly

A crisp, passionately argued answer to the question that everyone who’s grown dependent on digital devices is asking: Where’s the rest of my life? Hamlet’s BlackBerry challenges the widely held assumption that the more we connect through technology, the better. It’s time to strike a new balance, William Powers argues, and discover why it's also important to disconnect. Part memoir, part intellectual journey, the book draws on the technological past and great thinkers such as Shakespeare and Thoreau. “Connectedness” has been considered from an organizational and economic standpoint—from Here Comes Everybody to Wikinomics—but Powers examines it on a deep interpersonal, psychological, and emotional level. Readers of Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point and Outliers will relish Hamlet’s BlackBerry.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062002877
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/29/2010
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
682,068
File size:
663 KB

Meet the Author

Award-winning media critic William Powers has written for the Atlantic, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and McSweeney's, among other publications. He lives on Cape Cod with his wife, the author Martha Sherrill, and their son.

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Hamlet's BlackBerry 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
TIE3rd More than 1 year ago
C'mon, do you??? A well written, carefully thought out plan to lessen your daily digital workload. And truly, do you really need all that info? I thought so too. until I read Powers book. An eyeopener!!! A calming piece of gentle guidance in this overburdened digital world we now live in. Get a copy.
peakbagger06 More than 1 year ago
This is the book I have been looking for. It gives you permission to live life deeply away from the constant hum of the internet, email, twittering, blogging etc. Well written, well-researched look at technology through the ages. Who'd have thought that Ben Franklin, Socrates, Shakespeare struggled with over-connectedness with the technologies of their day. Powers tells us how they "pulled the plug" and got in touch with their inner selves to reflect, think deeply and be serene. A practical book, Powers gives some concrete examples of how to manage the gadgets of the 21st century so that you run them, they don't run us. Bravo, Mr. Powers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thought this was to be about building a library on ones e book sibce i have about 400 archieved and 79 available plus an extra without a light with 300 plus thiught a general suggestion kist of complete works of would be given and what to be avoided as awful formating
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a somewhat breezily written book with lots of lessons from the author's life. Read Alone Together by Sherry Turkle for a much more profound discussion of this issue
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I don't normally read nonfiction, but this book really made me think about our culture and my own individual choices. It's refreshing to think that societies in the past have also had to adjust to new technologies and made it through unscathed! I'm passing this book around to everyone I know.
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