Hand of the Devil [NOOK Book]

Overview

Ashley Reeves is a young journalist at freak-of-nature magazine Missing Link. His future's bright, even if he does spend most of his time investigating hoaxes. When he receives a letter promising him a once-in-a-lifetime story, he jumps at the opportunity. The only thing is, his life is exactly what it might cost him.
The letter is from Reginald Mather, a man who at first seems no more than an eccentric collector of insects, happy to live in isolation on a remote island. But ...
See more details below
Hand of the Devil

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price

Overview

Ashley Reeves is a young journalist at freak-of-nature magazine Missing Link. His future's bright, even if he does spend most of his time investigating hoaxes. When he receives a letter promising him a once-in-a-lifetime story, he jumps at the opportunity. The only thing is, his life is exactly what it might cost him.
The letter is from Reginald Mather, a man who at first seems no more than an eccentric collector of insects, happy to live in isolation on a remote island. But when Ashley finds himself stranded with Mather and unearths the horrific truth behind the collector's past, he is thrown headlong into a macabre nightmare that quickly spirals out of control.
Ashley's life is in danger. . . .
And Mather is not the only enemy. . . .
Gruesome, compelling, and terrifying, The Hand of the Devil will make you never want to leave the house without bug spray again.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Mike Brown
This British author scores a winner first time out with this novel. Ashley Reeves, journalist for freak-of-nature magazine Missing Link, hears of a mysterious giant mosquito called the Ganges Red. Reeves visits Reginald Mather, an eccentric character at first blush, on the island on which he lives. Reeves expects a hoax, but Mather tells a tale from Vietnamese folklore of a man whose dying wife was saved by a few drops of her husband's blood. That act turned her into a mosquito-the Ganges Red. Reeve finds that eccentricity is merely a cover for Mather's madness. Mather is a butcher who performs horrible experiments on unsuspecting journalists whom he lures to the island with tales of the exotic mosquito, but he does it all at her behest. The Ganges Red is telepathic and more real and frightening than Reeves could ever imagine. Carter, who literally came out of the mailroom in this publisher's London office, tells an engaging tale, much of which is conversation driven-a good thing because he has an excellent ear for dialogue. Pacing is excellent as the events draw to culmination in a flurry of excitement. A few incidents of coarse language occur. One has a feeling that Carter was holding back a little when Reeves found himself knee-deep in body parts. One can hardly wait until he gives free reign to his sense of horror. Get multiple copies-this is sure to be a mover.
KLIATT
The Ganges Red mosquito is a giant form of the insect many people swat away on a daily basis. Instead of just drawing a small amount of blood, though, it drains the victim's entire body. Its saliva corrodes the person's skin and renders him or her unrecognizable. This horror novel traces the origin of "The Lady" and follows one reporter's attempt to document her and escape from the clutches of an insane serial killer. The reporter, Ashley Reeves, writes for a science magazine that focuses on weird subjects. When he receives a mysterious letter from Dr. Mather about the Ganges Red, he is intrigued, and decides to follow up on what could be an incredible story. The fact that Dr. Mather lives on a secluded island without a phone doesn't trouble him much, until he wrecks his own small boat trying to get there and is virtually trapped with Mather. Much foreshadowing implies that the doctor is more sinister than he seems, and Ashley eventually discovers an abandoned research laboratory on the island where horrible experiments have been done to human beings. Little does he know that the Ganges Red is all wrapped up in this scheme, and he must find a way to escape before Mather butchers him. The ending is somewhat contrived and the characterizations overdone, but Carter still tells an interesting tale. Not for the faint of heart, this story is full of gruesome descriptions of the experiments Mather conducted, as well as minute details of the mosquito's murders. Recommend this to readers with strong stomachs who enjoy serial killer or horror novels. KLIATT Codes: SA--Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2006, Random House, Delacorte, 273p., $7.95.. Ages 15to adult.
—Olivia Durant
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Ashley Reeves, an aspiring twenty-two-year-old journalist working for the slightly questionable Missing Link, a science magazine "dedicated to the weird and wonderful," is lured to a secluded island by a letter promising him the inside scoop on the only living specimen of a legendary mosquito species, the "Ganges Red." Even though the story is narrated by the protagonist, the unfolding events are so horrific that one has to continually wonder in what form or at what cost he'll survive to tell it. The insect in question is telepathic and homicidal; she doesn't just bite her victims, but drains them of blood and dissolves what's left of them with corrosive saliva. She has found the perfect partner in Reginald Mather, author of the letter and a deranged surgeon who delights in performing torturous and inevitably fatal experiments on anyone unfortunate enough to fall into his trap. When Reeves crash lands his boat on the island in a storm, he seems destined to be the next victim of one of the murderers or both, but the mosquito has other plans for him. There are no characters in this book under the age of twenty but older teens who like horror stories will probably be drawn to the gruesome details and seemingly indestructible villains.
School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up
As a journalist for the weird science magazine Missing Link , recent college graduate Ashley Reeves has dealt with his fair share of crackpots and phony tips, but the letter from Reginald Mather seems genuine. Mather claims to have in his possession the only known specimen of a particularly large and deadly variety of mosquito known as the Ganges Red, a legendary creature believed by some to have supernatural abilities. Ashley quickly departs for Mather's isolated cabin on Aries Island where, of course, he is promptly cut off from civilization and finds himself in the company of a very unpleasant insect and at least one madman. It turns out that the Ganges Red, aka Nhan Diep, was once a human who betrayed her husband, and she needs Ashley's blood to break the curse. Carter's novel contains a fair helping of gore, but never generates much tension or atmosphere. Although large portions of the novel are devoted to people explaining various back stories to one another, none of the characters (with the possible exception of Mather) really emerges as an individual. Suspense and horror fans will probably find Lois Duncan and Darren Shan more satisfying.
—Christi VothCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307495785
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 6/3/2009
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Age range: 14 years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Dean Vincent Carter is 28 and sorts the post at a top London publishing house. He landed his book deal after catching an editor's eye with his witty emails. The author lives in London.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

I: Proposition

London September 2005





My name is Ashley Reeves and I’m extremely lucky to be alive.

It’s one thing to be told a scary story, and quite another to be right in the middle of one. But that was where I found myself only a few days ago, and I’m worried that if I don’t write down each and every detail of my horrifying experience on Aries Island, I may end up convincing myself that it was all fiction, the diseased imaginings of a young man on the brink of madness.

That I survived the ordeal is a mystery in itself, for I stared death in the face more than once. But perhaps the most worrying aspect of it all is what drove me to visit that island in the first place. I’m a journalist, and therefore naturally predisposed to pursue stories. But this story should have made me cautious right from the beginning, and I realized too late that I had let my ambition lead me into more trouble than I could handle.

This account is of an extraordinary creature. A creature so dangerous that if it had been able to reproduce, it could have wiped us all from the face of the earth.

Mosquitoes are just insects. Nothing more than tiny biological machines. But they are also carriers. They communicate diseases like malaria, yellow fever, West Nile virus, dengue and encephalitis. Transmitting infection seems to be their primary function. Mankind is perhaps the herd that mosquitoes are destined to thin: millions of lives have been claimed by malaria alone. But mosquitoes don’t know what they are doing. They don’t know they are carrying terrible diseases. It would be an incredible thing indeed if a mosquito, or any insect, were capable of thought.

But one thing I’m reminded of time and time again is that Mother Nature loves a paradox.

I think many journalists must come to a point in their career when they think they’ve heard everything. I came to that point surprisingly early, with stories about three-headed pigs, blue sheep and talking plants; the only thing that shocked me was the audacity of the idiots behind them.

The magazine I work for, Missing Link, was launched a few years ago. My editor, Derek Jones, left a news- paper he’d been with for several years and started up Link on his own, to cash in on the public’s fascination for all things “inexplicable.”

The magazine has done very well, building up a pretty respectable readership. I came on board some months ago, fresh from college with a degree in journalism. But by then certain changes had already taken place at Missing Link. Derek had just sold the magazine but had decided to stay on as editor. The new owner was obsessed with credibility and wanted Link to focus more on oddities and freaks of nature, than on what he deemed “nonsense.” Out went the little green men and in came the flora and fauna. Soon we were rebranded a “science magazine,” dedicated to the weird and the wonderful. For me it was an exciting time and I was keen to get into serious reporting.

Gradually, however, doubts crept in about exactly what I’d got myself into. I’d been aware for a long time that honesty and journalism could be a difficult marriage, but I was surprised by exactly how difficult it was. I had to accept that the distortion of facts was not merely commonplace but ever present. Gradually elements of the job lost their appeal, but one that didn’t was Gina Newport, the magazine’s star photographer. At twenty-two she was nearly a full year older than me, and I’d liked her, a lot, from the moment I laid eyes on her. But somehow I could never find the opportunity or guts to do anything about the way I felt. Such is life.

Last Monday, a day that now seems lost in the mists of time, was the day the letter from Reginald Mather arrived. It was a glorious early autumn day, so I decided to run to work, taking my favorite route along the canal. After I’d reached the office, I showered, dressed and went next door to the newsagent’s to buy a carton of orange juice. Sitting behind my computer, I opened the juice and began sorting through the small pile of mail the office assistant had brought me. Mather’s letter was at the bottom, and was the only one that didn’t end up being filed in the trash.

The letter was brief, something that caught my attention straightaway. Usually the lunatics who write in waste page after page of paper trying to convince me that they have an amazing story for the magazine. Mather’s letter was businesslike, concise and therefore more credible.

Dear Mr. Reeves,

I have in my possession a specimen known as the “Ganges Red,” a unique strain of the Aedes aegypti mosquito family and the only one of its kind. If you were to ask an expert about it, they would no doubt tell you that it does not exist.

I have enclosed a map that will help you find your way to Aries Island, located in the middle of Lake Languor. I own the only house on the island, so you should have no trouble finding me. A boat can be chartered from Tryst harbor. I know the harbormaster to be a very helpful fellow, and can assure you that his rates are most reasonable.

It would be splendid if you could come right away, though of course I understand that a journalist’s schedule must be fairly tight. I regret that I have no telephone, so shall expect you at any time, or otherwise a letter to say that you cannot come.

I must ask for your discretion in this matter. I am keen to share my discovery with the world, but being a private man I need to keep certain details to myself. Therefore I ask, if it is possible, that you should not divulge the specifics of this letter to a third party.

I have the honor to be, sir,

your obedient servant,





Reginald C. Mather

I read it through a second time. Unlike most of the letters I received, it was intriguing. I had a hunch that Mather’s claim was genuine, and that there could be an exciting story lurking behind it. At the very least it could mean a day out of the office. I read it again, then made up my mind to talk to Derek.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 11, 2011

    Fantastic

    I+bought+this+book+on+a+whim+and+it+turned+out+to+be+a+hidden+gem.+The+plot+is+full+if+twists+and+turn.+Above+all+this+book+is+an+amasing+thriller+and+will+give+you+goosebumps.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2011

    book rating

    this boo is like a windy road tistingaround spooky corners. this book is also not for kids under 10 years of age because of the sex, violence, and very bad wordon the other hand, adults, have fun reading this book....and if you still don hink ifs apropriate well...it is very detaliled sex that would make sex sound fun for your kids and tell them how to do it just perfectly!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 31, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    Bugs. Honestly, I don't particularly care for them. They seem to like munching on me, even though I'm pretty sure I'm not the type who is made of sugar and spice. I also suffer from arachnophobia; I absolutely, positively despise spiders. Those hairy bodies, those spiny legs, those googly eyes. Spiders truly freak me out. So, I guess I should start by thanking Mr. Carter for not making the bug in his story a spider. On the other hand, he made the bug in his story this ginormous, otherworldly red mosquito who managed to give me nightmares. I guess that means his story was effective; it also means I'm suffering from hallucinatory mosquito bites just from reading THE HAND OF THE DEVIL. <BR/><BR/>Ashley Reeves is twenty-one, a bright guy who works as an investigative journalist for the magazine Missing Link. Where they once centered around inexplicable stories based on alien sightings and the like, they now focus on freak of nature stories that deal with facts and scientific proof. Ashley still finds himself dealing with a lot of hoaxes, so when he receives a letter from one Mr. Reginald C. Mather, he's undeniably excited. Mr. Mather has asked for Ashley to join him at his home on Aries Island to view the Ganges Red, a very unique mosquito that he claims to have in his possession. Curiosity piqued, Ashely sets off to visit Mr. Mather and his mosquito in the middle of Lake Languor. <BR/><BR/>It turns out that Reginald Mather was telling the truth. He does, in fact, own the Ganges Red, also known as The Lady or The Devil's Hand. Reginald delights in telling Ashley stories about his very unique, and slightly frightening, bug friend. Some of the stories seem outrageously fantastic, such as the fable that The Lady is the reincarnation of a woman from a Vietnamese tale. Or that the Ganges Red has been alive for hundreds of years, killing and destroying numerous humans on its voyage. <BR/><BR/>As Ashley finds himself trapped on Aries Island during a storm, he realizes that although The Lady seems to be more than just a simple insect, the danger he's finding himself in might actually be coming from Mather himself. It seems the former doctor, now turned recluse and devoted keeper of the Ganges Red, is hiding a murderous secret of his own, and it's just Ashley's luck to have stumbled upon it. As Ashley fights for his life from the wicked Mr. Mather, he will have to suspend everything he's ever thought to be true to understand the true nature of The Devil's Hand and her hold over Mr. Mather. <BR/><BR/>If you're looking for a book that will unnerve you, mess with your mind, and play on all of the fears you've ever had, then THE HAND OF THE DEVIL is definitely the book for you. Unable to stop reading even while I was scratching at my faux mosquito bites, this is one story that will stay with you long after you've finished it--whether you want it to or not.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2006

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    Bugs. Honestly, I don't particularly care for them. They seem to like munching on me, even though I'm pretty sure I'm not the type who is made of sugar and spice. I also suffer from arachnophobia I absolutely, positively despise spiders. Those hairy bodies, those spiny legs, those googly eyes. shudder Spiders truly freak me out. So, I guess I should start by thanking Mr. Carter for not making the bug in his story a spider. On the other hand, he made the bug in his story this ginormous, otherworldly red mosquito who managed to give me nightmares. I guess that means his story was effective it also means I'm suffering from hallucinatory mosquito bites just from reading THE HAND OF THE DEVIL. Ashley Reeves is twenty-one, a bright guy who works as an investigative journalist for the magazine Missing Link. Where they once centered around inexplicable stories based on alien sightings and the like, they now focus on freak of nature stories that deal with facts and scientific proof. Ashley still finds himself dealing with a lot of hoaxes, so when he receives a letter from one Mr. Reginald C. Mather, he's undeniably excited. Mr. Mather has asked for Ashley to join him at his home on Aries Island to view the Ganges Red, a very unique mosquito that he claims to have in his possession. Curiosity piqued, Ashely sets off to visit Mr. Mather and his mosquito in the middle of Lake Languor. It turns out that Reginald Mather was telling the truth. He does, in fact, own the Ganges Red, also known as The Lady or The Devil's Hand. Reginald delights in telling Ashley stories about his very unique, and slightly frightening, bug friend. Some of the stories seem outrageously fantastic, such as the fable that The Lady is the reincarnation of a woman from a Vietnamese tale. Or that the Ganges Red has been alive for hundreds of years, killing and destroying numerous humans on its voyage. As Ashley finds himself trapped on Aries Island during a storm, he realizes that although The Lady seems to be more than just a simple insect, the danger he's finding himself in might actually be coming from Mather himself. It seems the former doctor, now turned recluse and devoted keeper of the Ganges Red, is hiding a murderous secret of his own, and it's just Ashley's luck to have stumbled upon it. As Ashley fights for his life from the wicked Mr. Mather, he will have to suspend everything he's ever thought to be true to understand the true nature of The Devil's Hand and her hold over Mr. Mather. If you're looking for a book that will unnerve you, mess with your mind, and play on all of the fears you've ever had, then THE HAND OF THE DEVIL is definitely the book for you. Unable to stop reading even while I was scratching at my faux mosquito bites, this is one story that will stay with you long after you've finished it--whether you want it to or not.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)