Handbook of Survey Research: Quantitative Studies in Social Relations

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Overview

This volume is a comprehensive guide to the major components of survey research design and data analysis. State-of-the-art essays by acknowledged authorities in the field outline the techniques and practical applications of every aspect of survey research. The thorough presentation and up-to-date bibliographies make this an invaluable handbook for the practitioner and student.
From the Preface
We had four main goals in writing this book:
1. To clarify and develop models and methods for causal analysis of dynamic social processes.
2. To formulate continuous-time models of change in both quantitative and qualitative outcomes and to develop suitable methods for estimating these models from the kinds of data commonly available to sociologists.
3. To develop a stochastic framework for analyzing both qualitative and quantitative outcomes.
4. To altere the way that sociologists think about the empirical study of social change processes.
This book is divided into three parts. Part I provides a general background for what follows; it includes both a discussion of the substantive importance of dynamic analyses is sociology and a review of models and methods previously used by sociologists interested in the empirical study of social dynamics. Part II contains eight chapters on models and methods for analyzing change in qualitative outcomes; it concentrates mainly on methods based on analyses of event-history data. Part III contains six chapters on comparable models and methods for analyzing change in quantitative outcomes; it focuses primarily on methods based on analysis of panel data.

This book is divided into three parts. Part 1 provides a general background for what follows; it includes both a discussion of the substantive importance of dynamic analyses is sociology and a review of models and methods previously used by sociologists interested in the empirical study of social dynamics. Part 2 contains eight chapters on models and methods for analyzing change in qualitative outcomes; it concentrates mainly on methods based on analyses of event-history data. Part 3 contains six chapters on comparable models and methods for analyzing change in quantitative outcomes; it focuses primarily on methods based on analysis of panel data.

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Contributors.
Preface.
Sample Surveys, History, Current Practice, Future Prospects: by P.H. Rossi, J.D. Wright, and A.B. Anderson:
Introduction.
A Short History of Sample Surveys.
Survey Research in the 1980s.
Current Developments and Issues in Survey Research.
The Handbook of Survey Research.
Sampling Theory: by M. Frankel:
Introduction.
Stratified Sampling.
Cluster Sampling.
Advanced Topics.
Further Reading and Other Topics.
Bibliography.
Measurement: by G.W. Bohrnstedt:
Measurement.
Platonic and Classical True Scores.
Reliability and Validity Defined.
The Effect of Unreliability on Statistical Estimates.
Reliability as a Function of the Number of Independent Measures.
Types of Reliability.
Factor Analysis and Internal Consistency.
Validity.
Conclusion.
Management of Survey Organizations: byK. Prewitt:
Introduction.
The Goals of a Survey Research Organization.
The Management Issue.
A Personal Postscript.
Applied Sampling: by S. Sudman:
Introduction.
How Good Does the Sample Need to Be?
Inappropriate Sample Designs.
The Use of Biased Samples for Screening.
Defining the Population.
Problems with Oveerdefining the Population.
Operational Definitions of the Population.
Small-Scale Sampling with Limited Resources.
A Credibility Scale.
Examples.
Simple Random Sampling.
Random Numbers.
Systematic Sampling.
Are Systematic Samples Simple Random Samples?
The Uses and Limitations of Lists.
Blanks and Ineligibles on Lists.
Duplications.
Omissions from Lists.
The Use of Telephone Directories and Random Digit Dialing.
Screening for Special Populations.
How Big Should the Sample Be?
Current Sample Sizes Used.
The Reasons for Stratified Sampling.
Appropriate and Inappropriate Uses of Stratification.
The Strata Are of Primary Interest.
Variances Differ between Strata.
Costs differ by Strata.
Additional Reading.
Questionnaire Construction and Item Writing: by P.B. Sheatsley:
Introduction.
Standardized Questionnaires.
Mode of Administration.
Type of Sample to Be Interviewed.
Qualities of a Good Questionnaire.
Deciding on Content.
Writing the Questions.
Question Order and Format.
Pretesting.
Back to the Drawing Board.
Data-Based Considerations.
Other Types of Instruments and Materials.
Summary.
Measurement: Theory and Techniques: by A.B. Anderson, A. Basilevsky, and D.P.J. Hum:
Introduction.
Measurement Theory.
Scaling Techniques.
Concluding Remarks.
Bibliography.
Response Effects: by N.M. Bradburn:
Introduction.
Model for Conceptualizing Factors That Affect Responses.
Empirical Studies of Response Effects.
Conclusions.
Data Collection: Planning and Management: by E. Weinberg:
Objectives of the Survey Interview.
Tasks to Accomplish the Objectives.
Summary.
Mail and Other Self-Administered Questionnaires: by D.A. Dillman:
Introduction.
The Total Design Method.
Limitations of Mail Surveys.
Costs.
Other Self-Administered Questionnaires.
Conclusion.
Computers in Survey Research: by N. Karweit and E.D. Meyers, Jr.:
Introduction.
Instrument Design.
Sampling.
Field Monitoring.
Coding and Editing.
Data Capture.
Data Cleaning.
Scale-Index Construction.
Data Base Organization.
Data Retrieval.
Statistical Analysis.
Documentation.
Report Writing.
Concluding Remarks.
Missing Data: by A.B. Anderson, A. Basilevsky, and D.P.J. Hum:
Introduction.
The Analysis of Experimental Design models Using Incomplete Data.
Missing Data in Survey Samples.
Regression Analysis with Incomplete Observations.
Other Multivariate Models.
Summary.
Applications of the General Linear Model to Survey Data: by R.A. Berk:
Introduction.
The Two-Variable Regression Model.
The Multivariate Model.
Some Common Problems with the Multivariate Model.
Some Concluding Observations.
Analyzing Qualitative Data: by D.G. Taylor:
Introduction.
Modeling the Distribution of Cases in a Contingency Table.
Latent Structure Analysis.
Linear Models for Qualitative Data.
Conclusion.
Causal Modeling and Survey Research: by R.M. Stolzenberg and K.C. Land:
Introduction.
Some Basic Principles of Nonexperimental Causal Inference.
Some Types of Recursive Causal models and Their Representations.
Some Uses of Nonrecursive Causal Models.
Conclusion.
Surveys as Social Indicators: Problems in Monitoring Trends: by E. Martin:
Introduction.
Two Puzzles: Assessing Trends in Criminal Victimization and Confidence in American Institutions.
Sources of Survey Noncomparability.
Conclusions and Recommendations.
Chapter References.
Index.
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