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The Handloader's Manual of Cartridge Conversions
     

The Handloader's Manual of Cartridge Conversions

4.6 3
by John J. Donnelly
 

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Now available for the first time since 2003, The Handloader’s Manual of Cartridge Conversions offers the handloader all the physical data, how-to designs, tools, and drawings needed to convert modern, easily obtainable materials into more than 1,000 different rifle and pistol cartridge cases, ranging from the obsolete patterns to modern, cutting-edge

Overview


Now available for the first time since 2003, The Handloader’s Manual of Cartridge Conversions offers the handloader all the physical data, how-to designs, tools, and drawings needed to convert modern, easily obtainable materials into more than 1,000 different rifle and pistol cartridge cases, ranging from the obsolete patterns to modern, cutting-edge “wildcats.” This classic guide has been revised with a new, easy-to-reference format, complete with a full index of hundreds of cartridges. This truly is the handloader’s one-stop guide for creating personalized cartridges.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616082383
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
08/17/2011
Edition description:
Revised Edition
Pages:
608
Sales rank:
286,246
Product dimensions:
10.26(w) x 8.12(h) x 1.29(d)

Meet the Author

John J. Donnelly was a writer who founded Ballistek, a custom ammunition business, in 1981. He worked as a manufacturing engineer and tool designer.

Judy Donnelly is a writer who resides in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

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The Handloader's Manual of Cartridge Conversions 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Outstanding resource for obsolete case forming!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago

Good information for the reloading wildcatter. The book contains something like 900+ cartridges, both common and wildcat, with specific dimensions and steps to creating the cartridge from others.

The book also describes, some in detail and some briefly, steps needed to work brass to meet design specifications.

Only complaint is the unusual arrangement of the cartridges. Normally, manuals arrange the cartridges by caliber and then by volume. In this book they are arranged by caliber number (i.e. .300 Weatherby comes before .308 Winchester) and then alphabetically (i.e. .300 Weatherby comes before .300 Winchester). Other than this, I found the book to be exactly what I needed in my quest for a non-belted magnum, .30 caliber, with a longer neck than a .300 Winchester, and better efficiency than the Weatherby. Good reading.