Handmade Home: Simple Ways to Repurpose Old Materials into New Family Treasures

Handmade Home: Simple Ways to Repurpose Old Materials into New Family Treasures

3.7 9
by Amanda Blake Soule
     
 

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For many of us, our home is the center of our life. It is the place where our families meet and mingle, where we share our meals and share our dreams. So much more than just a space to live, our homes offer us a place of comfort, nourishment, and love for us and for our children.

In
Handmade Home, Amanda Blake Soule,
author of The

Overview

For many of us, our home is the center of our life. It is the place where our families meet and mingle, where we share our meals and share our dreams. So much more than just a space to live, our homes offer us a place of comfort, nourishment, and love for us and for our children.

In
Handmade Home, Amanda Blake Soule,
author of The Creative Family and the blog SouleMama.com, offers simple sewing and craft projects for the home that reflect the needs, activities, and personalities of today’s families. As Amanda writes in the introduction, “As a crafter, I’m always looking for the next thing I want to make. As a mama, I’m always looking for the next thing we need—to do, to have, to use—as a family. The coming together of these parts is where the heart of Handmade Home
lies.”

Filled with thirty-three projects made by reusing and repurposing materials, all of the items here offer a practical use in the home. From picnic blankets made out of repurposed bed sheets to curtains made out of vintage handkerchiefs, these projects express the sense of making something new out of something old as a way to live a more financially pared-down and simple life; lessen our impact on the earth; connect to the past and preserve a more traditional way of life; and place value on the work of the hands. Also included are projects that children can help with, allowing them to make their own special contribution to the family home.

More than just a collection of projects for handmade items, this book offers the tools to create a life—and home—full of beauty, integrity, and joy.

Projects include:

  • Papa’s Healing Cozy: This hot water bottle cover becomes a simple way to offer comfort to a sick child
  • Baby Sling: A simple pattern for an object that offers so much to a small child—refuge from the world and a place to lay their head next to a parent’s heart
  • Beach Blanket To-Go: Repurpose old sheets to create the perfect picnic blanket for special outdoor meals
  • Cozy Wall Pockets: A creative solution for storing a child’s small treasures
    Pattern templates for Handmade Home

    The pattern templates for the projects in this book are available here for your convenience. Click on the project name below to download a PDF of the pattern template at actual size.

    Broadturn Bag
    Millie’s Hot Pad
    Papa’s Healing Cozy
    Women’s Cloth
    The Family Heart
    Family Sweater Hats
    Memory Tree Quilt Art

  • Editorial Reviews

    From the Publisher
    “Amanda Blake Soule makes me want to run to my sewing basket and pull out needle and thread.”—Barbara Mahany, Chicago Tribune

    Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9780834821064
    Publisher:
    Shambhala Publications, Inc.
    Publication date:
    06/17/2011
    Series:
    Trumpeter
    Sold by:
    Barnes & Noble
    Format:
    NOOK Book
    Sales rank:
    847,701
    File size:
    8 MB

    Read an Excerpt

    Click on the thumbnail for a larger view.

    Table of Contents

    Pages 46–47

    Pages 124–125

    Pages 126–127

    Meet the Author

    Amanda Blake Soule is the creator of the popular blog SouleMama.com. Amanda spends her days with her four young children—making things, thrifting, exploring and being inspired by their coastal Maine surroundings. Learn more about her and find her blog at amandasoule.com.

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    Handmade Home: Simple Ways to Repurpose Old Materials into New Family Treasures 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
    crankybirder More than 1 year ago
    I discovered this book through a Mother Earth News e-mail. There was a link to an excerpt from the book--"Maddie's Rag Rug." The materials listed were fabric, lacing cord, hand-quilting thread, a heavy-duty needle and a darning needle. I was excited about the project and looked up the book on-line. I saw something about antique handkerchief curtains, and was intrigued by that as well, since I have many beautiful handkerchiefs from my grandmothers. I was so enthusiastic I ordered a copy of the book on-line for pick-up at the Barnes & Noble in my neighborhood. As soon as I got it, I started flipping through it. On page 20, under the heading, "Tools You Need," the author wrote: "However, each project assumes you have the following essentials: A sewing machine and all the essential tools needed for maintaining and running it. (See Finding Vintage and Thrifted Materials on page 10 for tips on purchasing your own.) What a disappointment! I don't have a sewing machine, and, as I live in a studio apartment with limited space, I don't really have room for one. So--what to do with the book? Donate it to a used book store? The rebel in me is tempted to defy the "essential tools" rule and try a few projects--such as the rag rug or the silky eye pillow--despite not having a sewing machine. Several years ago I pieced some quilts and I did that all by hand. And I could probably make the "Art and Hooks Rack" on page 109, since no sewing machine seems to be needed for that particular project. Although, as a single person, I do not have access to charming children's artwork, I assume that other artwork could be used. A few other comments--all based on an initial examination of the book. I have not tried to do any of the projects. But while reading through the instructions for making the rag rug, I was a little confused by the instructions for the lacing--it would have been nice to have had an illustration of the technique. I do think the book is beautifully produced--I love the look of it, and the photographs.
    Brandie185 More than 1 year ago
    I just LOVE this book! I just can't speak highly enough of it. I love her blog and her first book, so this is no surprise. But I do love this book! =) If you are at all interesting in making more things for around your home, I highly recommend it. If you just love reading about people who make beautiful things, you will love this book. If you like looking at gorgeous pictures, you will love this book!
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
    I can't help but like this book. It's beautifully photographed and the projects are explained well. Some of the projects...well, they're kind of "out there" (ie "Women's Cloth"...no, REALLY: a pattern to make your own pads). The book has smatterings of family stories in it (many of the patterns are geared around children), which is nice; it gives the book some balance between the "eco-nazi" overtones and simply being thrify, nostalgic, and practical.
    LR12 More than 1 year ago
    Are you the type of person that saves all your wine corks in hopes of making a corkboard one day? Or do you save old clothes because you think you might one day for some reason wear it again? Then this book is for you! Get inspired to create something for your home, start with a potholder.
    AmyDe More than 1 year ago
    Amanda has presented a lovely book with many projects that are practical and charming. Handmade Home is filled with easy to follow projects and practical advice for thrifting and repurposing materials already on hand or easily available. Amanda has followed and participated in the return to a family, handmade, and repurposed lifestyle which is reflected beautifully in Handmade Home; it's like stepping into her day. Overall lovely and useful - a wonderful addition to any handmade family's bookshelf.
    candleWI More than 1 year ago
    the tutorials were short with limited direction. Also, the projects were not anything special. it's more of the authors story about reusing fabrics. I actually tried to return it but failed and am now stuck with a book I don't ever plan on using:(
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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