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Hands-On Electronics: A Practical Introduction to Analog and Digital Circuits / Edition 1
     

Hands-On Electronics: A Practical Introduction to Analog and Digital Circuits / Edition 1

by Daniel M. Kaplan, Christopher G. White
 

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ISBN-10: 0521893518

ISBN-13: 9780521893510

Pub. Date: 06/28/2010

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Packed full of real circuits to build and test, Hands-On Electronics is a unique introduction to analog and digital electronics theory and practice. Ideal both as a college textbook and for self-study, the friendly style, clear illustrations and construction details included in the book encourage rapid and effective learning of analog and digital circuit design theory

Overview

Packed full of real circuits to build and test, Hands-On Electronics is a unique introduction to analog and digital electronics theory and practice. Ideal both as a college textbook and for self-study, the friendly style, clear illustrations and construction details included in the book encourage rapid and effective learning of analog and digital circuit design theory. All the major topics for a typical one-semester course are covered, including RC circuits, diodes, transistors, op-amps, oscillators, digital logic, counters, D/A converters and more. There are also chapters explaining how to use the equipment needed for the examples (oscilloscope, multimeter and breadboard), together with pin-out diagrams for all the key components referred to in the book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521893510
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
6.85(w) x 9.72(h) x 0.47(d)

Table of Contents

List of figuresxi
List of tablesxv
About the authorsxvi
To the Readerxvii
Acknowledgmentsxviii
Introductionxix
1Equipment familiarization: multimeter, breadboard, and oscilloscope1
1.1Multimeter1
1.2Breadboard2
1.2.1Measuring voltage4
1.2.2Measuring current; resistance and Ohm's law5
1.2.3Measuring resistance8
1.3Oscilloscope8
1.3.1Probes and probe test10
1.3.2Display11
1.3.3Vertical controls11
1.3.4Horizontal sweep12
1.3.5Triggering12
1.3.6Additional features13
2RC circuits15
2.1Review of capacitors15
2.1.1Use of capacitors; review of AC circuits17
2.1.2Types and values of capacitors19
2.2Review of current, voltage, and power20
2.2.1Destructive demonstration of resistor power rating21
2.3Potentiometer as voltage divider22
2.3.1DC voltage divider23
2.3.2AC voltage divider23
2.4RC circuit24
2.5RC circuit as integrator24
2.6Low-pass filter25
2.7RC circuit as differentiator27
2.8High-pass filter28
2.9Summary of high- and low-pass filters28
3Diodes31
3.1Semiconductor basics31
3.2Types of diodes35
3.3Rectification36
3.4Diode action--a more sophisticated view37
3.5Measuring the diode characteristic38
3.6Exploring rectification40
3.7Input and output impedance45
4Bipolar transistors47
4.1Bipolar-junction-transistor basics47
4.1.1Basic definitions50
4.1.2Simplest way to analyze transistor circuits51
4.1.3Ebers-Moll transistor model52
4.2Experiments54
4.2.1Checking transistors with a meter54
4.2.2Emitter follower55
4.2.3Common-emitter amplifier57
4.2.4Collector as current source59
4.2.5Transistor switch60
4.3Additional exercises61
4.3.1Darlington connection61
4.3.2Push-pull driver62
4.3.3Common-base amplifier63
5Transistors II: FETs65
5.1Field-effect transistors65
5.1.1FET characteristics66
5.1.2Modeling FET action68
5.2Exercises69
5.2.1FET characteristics69
5.2.2FET current source70
5.2.3Source follower71
5.2.4JFET amplifier73
6Transistors III: differential amplifier75
6.1Differential amplifier75
6.1.1Operating principle76
6.1.2Expected differential gain76
6.1.3Measuring the differential gain77
6.1.4Input offset voltage78
6.1.5Common-mode gain78
6.2Op amps and their building blocks79
6.2.1Current mirror79
6.2.2Differential amplifier with current-source loads80
6.2.3Improved current mirror82
6.2.4Wilson current mirror82
7Introduction to operational amplifiers85
7.1The 741 operational amplifier85
7.1.1741 pinout and power connections86
7.1.2An ideal op amp87
7.1.3Gain of inverting and noninverting amplifiers88
7.1.4Op amp 'golden rules'90
7.1.5The nonideal op amp90
7.2Experiments91
7.2.1Testing open-loop gain91
7.2.2Inverting amplifier92
7.2.3Noninverting amplifier93
7.2.4Voltage follower94
7.2.5Difference amplifier95
7.3Additional experiments97
7.3.1Current source97
7.3.2Noninverting summing amp with difference amplifier98
8More op amp applications101
8.1Op amp signal processing101
8.1.1Differentiator102
8.1.2Integrator103
8.1.3Logarithmic and exponential amplifiers105
8.2Experiments106
8.2.1Differential and integral amplifiers106
8.2.2Logarithmic and exponential amplifiers108
8.2.3Op amp active rectifier108
8.2.4Op amp with push-pull power driver109
8.3Additional exercises111
9Comparators and oscillators113
9.1Experiments113
9.1.1Op amp as comparator113
9.1.2Unintentional feedback: oscillation115
9.1.3Intentional positive feedback: Schmitt trigger116
9.1.4RC relaxation oscillator117
9.1.5555 timer IC118
9.2Additional experiments121
9.2.1Alarm!121
9.2.2Sine/cosine oscillator122
9.2.3Active bandpass filter123
10Combinational logic125
10.1Digital logic basics125
10.1.1Logic levels126
10.1.2Logic families and history127
10.1.3Logic gates129
10.1.4Summary of Boolean algebra130
10.2CMOS and TTL compared131
10.2.1Diode logic131
10.2.2Transistor-transistor logic (TTL)132
10.2.3Complementary MOSFET logic (CMOS)133
10.2.4Powering TTL and TTL-compatible integrated circuits136
10.3Experiments137
10.3.1LED logic indicators and level switches137
10.3.2MOSFETs138
10.3.3CMOS NAND gate140
10.3.4Using NANDs to implement other logic functions140
10.3.5TTL quad XOR gate141
10.4Additional exercises142
10.4.17485 4-bit magnitude comparator142
11Flip-flops: saving a logic state143
11.1General comments144
11.1.1Schematics144
11.1.2Breadboard layout144
11.1.3Synchronous logic144
11.1.4Timing diagrams144
11.2Flip-flop basics145
11.2.1Simple RS latch145
11.2.2D-type flip-flop147
11.3JK flip-flop148
11.4Tri-state outputs149
11.5Flip-flop applications151
11.5.1Divide-by-four from JK flip-flops151
11.5.2Contact bounce152
11.5.3Electronic coin toss153
12Monostables, counters, multiplexers, and RAM155
12.1Multivibrators156
12.2Counters156
12.3Experiments157
12.3.1Bi-quinary ripple counter157
12.3.2Monostable multivibrator159
12.3.3Multiplexer and finite-state machine162
12.3.4RAM162
13Digital [left and right arrow] analog conversion167
13.1A simple D/A converter fabricated from familiar chips168
13.2Tracking ADC170
13.3080x ADC and DAC chips171
13.3.1Successive-approximation ADC171
13.4Additional exercises177
13.4.1Digital recording177
13.4.2Successive-approximation ADC built from components178
Further reading183
Appendix AEquipment and supplies185
Appendix BCommon abbreviations and circuit symbols188
Appendix CRC circuits: frequency-domain analysis191
Appendix DPinouts194
Glossary of basic electrical and electronic terms197
Index199

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