Hands-On Networking with Internet Technologies / Edition 2

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 97%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $36.05   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$36.05
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(931)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
PAPERBACK New 0131486969 Student Edition. New book.

Ships from: Wright City, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$75.06
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23487)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$84.50
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(17712)

Condition: New
Brand New, Perfect Condition, Please allow 4-14 business days for delivery. 100% Money Back Guarantee, Over 1,000,000 customers served.

Ships from: Westminster, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$84.51
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
0131486969 Premium Publisher Direct Books are Like New or Brand New books direct from the publisher sometimes at a discount. Multiple copies are usually available. These books ... are not available for expedited shipping and may take up to 14 business days to receive. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Woodland Hills, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Express, 48 States
$88.74
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(31)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0131486969 Premium Publisher Direct Books are Like New or Brand New books direct from the publisher sometimes at a discount. Multiple copies are usually ... available. These books are not available for expedited shipping and may take up to 14 business days to receive. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Tarzana, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$119.44
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(5)

Condition: New
New

Ships from: Idyllwild, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$119.95
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(8)

Condition: New
5-12-04 other 2 BRAND NEW! ONLY Expedited orders are shipped with tracking number! *WE DO NOT SHIP TO PO BOX* Please allow up to 14 days delivery for order with standard ... shipping. SHIPPED FROM MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. Read more Show Less

Ships from: San Jose, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Acclaimed author Douglas E. Comer's book, Hands-On Networking with Internet Technologies, upholds the assertion that the best way to learn is by doing. Through laboratory experimentation, students and professionals gain a better understanding of how computer networks and Internet technologies operate in practice.

Organized into sections that focus on the hardware and software platforms of different lab facilities, this book systematically constructs and augments a practical knowledge of networking. From single computer applications to advanced network systems engineering, a broad spectrum of hands-on experiments addresses a variety of difficulty levels, and guides the user to a deeper comprehension of the functionality and subtleties of networking in action.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Comer (Purdue University) outlines the infrastructure of five types of network hardware platforms, and provides 45 experiments for using the hardware. Early sections describe experiments that can be carried out on conventional computers connected to a production network, while the later chapters on packet capture, intranet configuration, and protocol development require a special, dedicated facility. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131486966
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 5/12/2004
  • Series: Alternative eText Formats Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

A professor at Purdue University, Douglas E. Comer develops and teaches courses in computer networking and internetworking. His series of books on networking and TCP/IP protocols receives the highest acclaim; his books are popular worldwide. One of the researchers who contributed to the formation of the Internet in the late 1970s and 1980s, he served on the Internet Architecture Board, is a Fellow of the ACM, and was appointed to the ACM/IEEE joint curriculum committee that recommended laboratories in computer science and engineering curricula. Dr. Comer consults for industry and lectures about the Internet to hundreds of professionals and diverse audiences around the world at professional conferences and on-site presentations.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Network engineers, managers, programmers, professors and students have all asked how they can gain a deeper understanding of computer networks and internets. This book answers the question. It asserts that the best way to learn is by doing—there is no good substitute for hands-on experience with a real network. Interconnecting hardware, configuring network systems, measuring performance, observing protocols in action, and creating client-server programs that communicate over a network all help sharpen one's understanding and appreciation.

What hardware and software facilities are required for hands-on experimentation? Instead of specifying an exact platform, this book is organized into six sections that each consider a hardware platform and outline experiments that can be carried out using the hardware. The first section begins by considering the smallest possible facility, a single stand-alone computer. Successive sections describe increasingly more powerful (and more expensive) facilities and the experiments they support. The last sections document advanced hardware and software facilities used for protocol development and network systems engineering. The point is that experimentation is always possible—although the facilities at hand determine the types of experiments that can be performed, even low-cost, general-purpose facilities offer opportunities.

The broadest distinction among facilities concerns isolation. Early sections of the book describe experiments that can be carried out on conventional, general-purpose computers connected to a production network. Later sections describe experiments such as packet capture, intranet configuration, and protocol development that require a special, dedicated facility. Industry often uses the terms testbed or testnet to describe a separate dedicated facility; academia usually uses the term laboratory. An industrial testbed can serve two purposes. Like an academic laboratory, a testbed provides an environment that supports training. In addition the testbed provides a safe environment in which new or upgraded network systems can be configured, measured, and tested before being installed in the company's production network. Although we use the academic term laboratory throughout the book, many of the experiments are designed with industrial testbeds in mind. In the section on configuration, for example, experiments specify using an isolated facility to configure hosts, routers, and a firewall to form an intranet.

In addition to a wide variety of topics, the experiments in this book cover a wide range of difficulty. Some experiments, especially those near the beginning of each chapter, are straightforward and may require less than a half hour to perform. Other experiments are both difficult and lengthy. For example, the IP router experiment described in Chapter 20 is taken from a second-year graduate class that I teach at Purdue. Students work in teams and require most of a semester to build a working IP router. Most experiments list optional extensions that suggest ways to go beyond the basics. The best students in my classes work through all the options, and sometimes invent options of their own.

Networking professionals who are working alone can pick and choose among experiments in various chapters. Programmers will focus on the client-server experiments in Parts I and II; system administrators will focus on the configuration experiments in Part IV. Engineers who implement and optimize network systems and protocol stacks will focus on the performance measurements in Part III or protocol development experiments in Parts V and VI.

Professors teaching networking courses can choose experiments appropriate to the class. Most colleges and universities cram all of networking and internetworking into a single one-semester overview course. In such a course, students should see a wide range of experiments to acquaint them with all aspects of the subject, especially network programming, network measurement, and protocol analysis. For example, students in my undergraduate class begin the first week using Internet applications and writing programs as described in Part II. When the lectures cover Local Area Networks, the students are assigned measurement experiments from Part III. The weeks that the lectures cover IP and TCP, students perform packet capture and protocol analysis experiments from Part III. Finally, students are ready to tackle a more advanced (socket) programming experiment from Part III.

Colleges and universities fortunate enough to have multiple courses in networking can divide the experiments in this book among the courses and go into more depth in each. In a one-semester network programming course students concentrate on the programming experiments in Part III. Students in such a course also enjoy building the internet emulation gateway from Chapter 8 and constructing a library for the simplified API. If students do not have any previous experience, they can begin by using the simplified API in Part II, which allows them to start programming before they learn the details of sockets. I usually encourage students in a network programming course to incorporate the optional extensions and to think about ways the software can be parameterized.

In a one-semester network administration course, students can focus on the configuration experiments in Part IV. Students enjoy creating their own version of an intranet, and are especially pleased when they can configure unconventional domain names. As an interesting challenge, I ask students to establish two apparently unrelated domain hierarchies for the same set of computers.

Finally, in any course that discusses protocol design, students should begin by building the Internet emulation gateway described in Chapter 8. The gateway project requires students to extend their knowledge of socket programming to include UDP, allows them to see an application gateway, and causes them to consider the possible errors with which protocols must contend (i.e., packet loss, duplication, corruption, and delay).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Introduction and Overview.

I. A SINGLE COMPUTER.

2. Hardware and Software on a Single Computer.
3. Using a Single Computer for Probing and Testing.

II. NETWORK PROGRAMMING ON A SET OF SHARED WORKSTATIONS.

4. Hardware and Software for a Shared Workstation Lab.
5. Network Programming Experiments Using a Simplified API.
6. Network Programming Experiments Using the Socket API.
7. Concurrent Network Programming Experiments.
8. Protocol Design Experiments.
9. Experiments with Protocols from the TCP/IP Suite.

III. MEASUREMENT AND PACKET ANALYSIS ON AUGMENTED WORKSTATIONS.

10. Hardware and Software for an Augmented Shared Lab.
11. Network Measurement Experiments.
12. Packet Capture and Analysis Experiments.
13. Protocol Observation Experiments.

IV. CONFIGURATION EXPERIMENTS IN A DEDICATED INTRANET LAB.

14. Hardware and Software for a Dedicated Intranet Lab.
15. Internet Address Configuration Experiments.
16. Web Technology Configuration Experiments.
17. IP Routing and IP Forwarding Experiments.
18. Virtual and Protected Internet Environment Experiments.

V. PROTOCOL STACK IMPLEMENTATION IN A SPECIAL-PURPOSE LAB.

19.Hardware and Software for a Special-Purpose Protocol Development Lab.
20. Protocol Stack Development Experiments.

VI. COMPONENT DESIGN IN A NETWORK SYSTEM ENGINEERING LAB.

21. Hardware and Software for a Network System Engineering Lab.
22. Network Systems Engineering Experiments.
Index.
List of Experiments.
Read More Show Less

Preface

Network engineers, managers, programmers, professors and students have all asked how they can gain a deeper understanding of computer networks and internets. This book answers the question. It asserts that the best way to learn is by doing—there is no good substitute for hands-on experience with a real network. Interconnecting hardware, configuring network systems, measuring performance, observing protocols in action, and creating client-server programs that communicate over a network all help sharpen one's understanding and appreciation.

What hardware and software facilities are required for hands-on experimentation? Instead of specifying an exact platform, this book is organized into six sections that each consider a hardware platform and outline experiments that can be carried out using the hardware. The first section begins by considering the smallest possible facility, a single stand-alone computer. Successive sections describe increasingly more powerful (and more expensive) facilities and the experiments they support. The last sections document advanced hardware and software facilities used for protocol development and network systems engineering. The point is that experimentation is always possible—although the facilities at hand determine the types of experiments that can be performed, even low-cost, general-purpose facilities offer opportunities.

The broadest distinction among facilities concerns isolation. Early sections of the book describe experiments that can be carried out on conventional, general-purpose computers connected to a production network. Later sections describe experiments such as packet capture, intranet configuration, and protocol development that require a special, dedicated facility. Industry often uses the terms testbed or testnet to describe a separate dedicated facility; academia usually uses the term laboratory. An industrial testbed can serve two purposes. Like an academic laboratory, a testbed provides an environment that supports training. In addition the testbed provides a safe environment in which new or upgraded network systems can be configured, measured, and tested before being installed in the company's production network. Although we use the academic term laboratory throughout the book, many of the experiments are designed with industrial testbeds in mind. In the section on configuration, for example, experiments specify using an isolated facility to configure hosts, routers, and a firewall to form an intranet.

In addition to a wide variety of topics, the experiments in this book cover a wide range of difficulty. Some experiments, especially those near the beginning of each chapter, are straightforward and may require less than a half hour to perform. Other experiments are both difficult and lengthy. For example, the IP router experiment described in Chapter 20 is taken from a second-year graduate class that I teach at Purdue. Students work in teams and require most of a semester to build a working IP router. Most experiments list optional extensions that suggest ways to go beyond the basics. The best students in my classes work through all the options, and sometimes invent options of their own.

Networking professionals who are working alone can pick and choose among experiments in various chapters. Programmers will focus on the client-server experiments in Parts I and II; system administrators will focus on the configuration experiments in Part IV. Engineers who implement and optimize network systems and protocol stacks will focus on the performance measurements in Part III or protocol development experiments in Parts V and VI.

Professors teaching networking courses can choose experiments appropriate to the class. Most colleges and universities cram all of networking and internetworking into a single one-semester overview course. In such a course, students should see a wide range of experiments to acquaint them with all aspects of the subject, especially network programming, network measurement, and protocol analysis. For example, students in my undergraduate class begin the first week using Internet applications and writing programs as described in Part II. When the lectures cover Local Area Networks, the students are assigned measurement experiments from Part III. The weeks that the lectures cover IP and TCP, students perform packet capture and protocol analysis experiments from Part III. Finally, students are ready to tackle a more advanced (socket) programming experiment from Part III.

Colleges and universities fortunate enough to have multiple courses in networking can divide the experiments in this book among the courses and go into more depth in each. In a one-semester network programming course students concentrate on the programming experiments in Part III. Students in such a course also enjoy building the internet emulation gateway from Chapter 8 and constructing a library for the simplified API. If students do not have any previous experience, they can begin by using the simplified API in Part II, which allows them to start programming before they learn the details of sockets. I usually encourage students in a network programming course to incorporate the optional extensions and to think about ways the software can be parameterized.

In a one-semester network administration course, students can focus on the configuration experiments in Part IV. Students enjoy creating their own version of an intranet, and are especially pleased when they can configure unconventional domain names. As an interesting challenge, I ask students to establish two apparently unrelated domain hierarchies for the same set of computers.

Finally, in any course that discusses protocol design, students should begin by building the Internet emulation gateway described in Chapter 8. The gateway project requires students to extend their knowledge of socket programming to include UDP, allows them to see an application gateway, and causes them to consider the possible errors with which protocols must contend (i.e., packet loss, duplication, corruption, and delay).

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)