Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons: The Story of Phillis Wheatley

Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons: The Story of Phillis Wheatley

4.5 54
by Ann Rinaldi
     
 

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Kidnapped from her home in Senegal and sold as a slave in 1761, Phillis Wheatley—as she comes to be known—stuns her adopted country by becoming America's first published black poet.

Includes a reader's guide.
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Overview

Kidnapped from her home in Senegal and sold as a slave in 1761, Phillis Wheatley—as she comes to be known—stuns her adopted country by becoming America's first published black poet.

Includes a reader's guide.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A powerful portrait . . . A tragic tale, beautifully written and researched."—Kirkus Reviews
Children's Literature - Mary Sue Preissner
Readers will find this fictionalized account of the young African-American poetess, Phillis Wheatley, to be a slow read. While concerned with earning her freedom, it seems more of Phillis' thoughts are about her crush on her young master. While it can be said that there were slave owners who treated their slaves well, it appears to be a stretch to believe that life was as rosy as this portrayal.
The ALAN Review - Mike Angelotti
Here is a beautifully written story true to the historical facts of the life of Phillis Wheatly, America's first black poet. Yeet its credibility rests in its imaginative treatment of Phillis Wheatley the human being, of how a young African slave might have learned to read and write American English in pre-Revolutionary-War Boston. The novel is written as Phillis Wheatley might have written a memoir covering the period in her life from ages seven through approximately twenty-one; that is, from Keziah's abduction from a Senegal rice field by her vengeful uncle's warriors to her interview with General George Washington as "free nigra woman" Phillis Wheatley. Especially moving is her description of the "middle passage" between Senegal and Boston on the slave ship Phillis. Complementing a study of Phillis Wheatley's poetry might be her running commentary on the significance of writing and on her writing process. Her easy conversational style should make historical detail pleasantly consumable to young readers studying the period. In fact, Ann Rinaldi's fascinating "Author's Note" discusses the interplay of fact and fiction in the story. This book has strong interdisciplinary potential. It was much enjoyed and is highly recommended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152053932
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/01/2005
Series:
Great Episodes Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
202,441
Product dimensions:
4.42(w) x 6.86(h) x 0.93(d)
Lexile:
560L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

ANN RINALDI is an award-winning author best known for bringing history vividly to life. A self-made writer and newspaper columnist for twenty-one years, Ms. Rinaldi attributes her interest in history to her son, who enlisted her to take part in historical reenactments up and down the East Coast. She lives with her husband in central New Jersey. Visit her online at www.annrinaldi.com .

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Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons: The Story of Phillis Wheatley 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 56 reviews.
hockey22 More than 1 year ago
Awesome book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you like Ann Rinaldi's other books you will especially enjoy this one. I liked learning about Phillis Wheatley and everything that happened to her. One thing I don't understand is why she didn't have some bookstores sell the 300 books she got in the crate to sell. I also wondered why in real life Nathaniel would send her back from London early if she was becoming that popular. Overall it was an awesome book that I'm sure I'll read many more times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hang a Thousand trees with ribbons is an outstanding book! It kept me on the edge of my seat waiting for more. This book about a yong slave who was captured at a young age and was bought by a loving family. When there son teaches her to read and write it oppens up millions of doors for her! I found myself rooting for her all the way throught the book. This is a must read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved this book. It was fantastic! It was written very well with a great plot. It also brought back to my mind that slave owners were not always as bad as we think they are, although most of are horrible. the book was outstanding and I would deffinetly recommend it. You must read it. If you don't, you are making a horrible decision.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book really deserves about 8 stars because this is the only book that has kept my attention long enough to read the whole book. I have never read a whole book because they aren't really interesting enough to finish. I think Ann should keep up the good work and I promise that I will read more of her books in the future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a must read book! It tells of Phillis Wheatley's struggle to find her freedom in a world of slavery. Although she is a slave, she has always been treated as one of the Wheatley family, until her love for her white master is discovered.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very touching for me mostly because of the heart-felt writing done by one of my favoritte authors, Ann Rinaldi. This book is great for anyone 11 or older, and will seriously become the best book you have ever read. I highly recommend this book to you and your friends!
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This is one of the most amazing historical fiction books i have ever read. I promise it will not dissapoint you.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I love the way Ann Rinaldi teaches history. She has a way of making history come alive! Phillis Wheatley has a very compelling story!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book, Hang a thousand trees with ribbons, by Ann Rinaldi was one of the best historical fiction books I have read. This book is about the first black poet in all of history and how she, Phillis Wheatley, changed the whole world's outlook on her race. This book shows a totally different side of Phillis than what the biographies show. Rinaldi showed Phillis' life as being treated not as a slave, but as a part of the Wheatley family. They allowed her to eat at the table, be educated, and escape chores. Rinaldi vividly showed how Nathaniel used Phillis' feelings for him and his mother to get her to keep up writing and a good image while they stayed in London. He even went as far as to promise her finery and such and never appeared to mean it. This book is great for anyone who even relatively likes history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
when i started to read this book i remberd i hated biogrphy so i was about to put it down but i saw a word that really caught me i countiond reading i finshed the book in 2 days with 336 pages.and i stink at reading. now i by all the preaquals.read it you will love it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel takes you into its depths from the first page and keeps you there until you are done reading. I actually could not go to sleep last night when my mom took it away to punish me for horsing around with my little sister. I nearly had a fit! I am 13, so I guess that is reason enough to want to read this and to read Phillis's poems. The title, for those who want to know (yes, I saw the one review that said she didn't understand), means that her freedom is the minimum reward for her influential work. Mr. Wheatley reads it to Phillis when reviews of her book arrive and one says, I quote, 'We are much concerned to find that this ingenious young woman is yet a slave. The people of Boston boast themselves mostly on their principles of liberty. One such act as the purchase of her freedom would, in our opinion, have done more honor than HANGing A THOUSAND TREES WITH RIBBONS and emblems'. (I didn't get it at first, either.) So, the phrase is nearly self-explanatory when it states that her freedom is more worthy of praise than any other physical display of joy. (And, yes, I agree with all the other reviewers who say that the author's not is upsetting, but then again, I advise all those who thirst for a sense of history to brighten their future to read it. After all, if you just read the story, you won't know the rest of the events in her life. It is like having the last few pages of a biography torn away from the binding, leaving you having to look in the scholarly books, just as Ann Rinaldi said she wanted to avoid making this book.) Read this if you are a history fanatic!
Guest More than 1 year ago
this was a really good book. the end was depressing though and ruined my whole outlook on phillis wheatley and her poetry.