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Hanging Up
     

Hanging Up

3.6 3
by Delia Ephron
 

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"HILARIOUS. . . A CHARMING, ENTERTAINING READ."
--Los Angeles Times
"WONDERFUL. . . Eve Mozell is having a lousy day, and she hasn't even gotten past breakfast yet. Her father, a senile ex-alcoholic whose idea of a good joke is goosing his woman doctor, started phoning Eve at 6 a.m. Her teenage son, who alternately ignores and lectures her, is off to a

Overview

"HILARIOUS. . . A CHARMING, ENTERTAINING READ."
--Los Angeles Times
"WONDERFUL. . . Eve Mozell is having a lousy day, and she hasn't even gotten past breakfast yet. Her father, a senile ex-alcoholic whose idea of a good joke is goosing his woman doctor, started phoning Eve at 6 a.m. Her teenage son, who alternately ignores and lectures her, is off to a séance. ('You know, Mom, all doors are entrances. Think about it.') And a quick glance in the mirror turns out to be a big mistake. Oh, God, is that my face? . . . I need a vacation. No. This is just me. Me at forty-four. . . . What a terrific debut."
--Newsweek
"TRUE AND TOUCHING."
--People
"Delia Ephron is blessed with the driest of wits, the tenderest of hearts, and an uncanny ear for the way people really talk. Do yourself a favor and curl up with Hanging Up--but unplug the phone first."
--Armistead Maupin
"MOVING AND FUNNY. . . In some ways, Hanging Up is a funhouse version of King Lear."
--Newsday


From the Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The telephone plays an integral part in screenwriter and nonfiction author Ephron's (How to Eat Like a Child) humorous, if somewhat uncomfortable, look at the senility and death of a parent. Narrator Eve Mozell loves to chat on the phone, playing out nearly all of her relationships by talking into a plastic mouthpiece. Now 44 but still in the role of the unremarkable, overcompensating middle daughter, Eve finds the care of her elderly, alcoholic father foisted upon her by her sisters Georgia, an overbearing magazine editor, and Madeline, a dippy soap opera actress. With little support from either her work-absorbed husband, a public radio commentator, or her teenaged son, Eve struggles to understand the Mozell family neuroses. Flashbacks highlight her parents' scotch-soaked divorce, her mother's subsequent abandonment of the family and her father's descent into alcoholism and general obnoxiousness. Appropriately, a telephone relationship with a stranger helps Eve come to terms with the simultaneous love and disgust she feels for her father. All the phone talk makes the narrative dialogue-heavy, and most of Ephron's characters are gratingly self-absorbed. However, Eve's wry humor and gentle tolerance for these eccentrics and the foibles of life leaven the proceedings nicely, rendering this a novel few readers will hang up on. (July)
Mary Carroll
Ephron, a successful children's book author who has written and/or produced some of her sister Nora's films, tackles a tough subject in her first adult novel: a dysfunctional family dealing with death. Eve Mozell, 44, is the middle sister who winds up her father's caregiver; her older sister Georgia edits a women's magazine that bears her name in New York; and younger sister Maddy is a semisuccessful actress on Hollywood soaps. Mom walked out when Eve was in college; Dad, whose career writing sitcoms was dying even then, is an alcoholic manic depressive who, by the 1990s, suffers from what his doctor calls "the dwindles." Telephone lines bind this family and deliver its joys and woes; each ring produces mixed emotions--and antic plot elements, including the party Eve's event planning firm, No Surprises, arranges for several hundred otolaryngologists at the Nixon Library and the unexpected wisdom and support from the Iranian doctor whose car Eve's son damages (and from the doctor's quite remarkable mother). A funny, touching, often penetrating exploration of individual and family strengths and vulnerabilities.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399140525
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
07/18/1995
Pages:
1
Product dimensions:
6.18(w) x 9.26(h) x 1.18(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Delia Ephron, author and screenwriter, has written many books for children and adults, including the recent novel Hanging Up. Her film work as a writer and producer includes the movie Hanging Up, as well as You've Got Mail, Sleepless in Seattle, and Michael. She lives in New York City.

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Hanging Up 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
hi, i read this book about a few times and what i like about it, is that when you read it you put your self in Eve's possion in the first few pages and go along with what the author is trying to explain. i gave this book a four star because it deserves it and it make you think if your ganna end up like Eve or not!