Hank Greenberg: The Hero of Heroes

Hank Greenberg: The Hero of Heroes

3.3 3
by John Rosengren
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Baseball during the Great Depression of the 1930s galvanized communities and provided a struggling country with heroes. Jewish player Hank Greenberg gave the people of Detroit—and America—a reason to be proud.

But America was facing more than economic hardship. Hitler’s agenda heightened the persecution of Jews abroad whileSee more details below

Overview

Baseball during the Great Depression of the 1930s galvanized communities and provided a struggling country with heroes. Jewish player Hank Greenberg gave the people of Detroit—and America—a reason to be proud.

But America was facing more than economic hardship. Hitler’s agenda heightened the persecution of Jews abroad while anti-Semitism intensified political and social tensions in the U.S. The six-foot-four-inch Greenberg, the nation’s most prominent Jew, became not only an iconic ball player, but also an important and sometimes controversial symbol of Jewish identity and the American immigrant experience.

Throughout his twelve-year baseball career and four years of military service, he heard cheers wherever he went along with anti-Semitic taunts. The abuse drove him to legendary feats that put him in the company of the greatest sluggers of the day, including Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx, and Lou Gehrig. Hank’s iconic status made his personal dilemmas with religion versus team and ambition versus duty national debates.
 
Hank Greenberg is an intimate account of his life—a story of integrity and triumph over adversity and a portrait of one of the greatest baseball players and most important Jews of the twentieth century.

INCLUDES PHOTOS

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Rosengren pens a textured tale—of Henry Greenberg, the Moses of Baseball; Hankus Spankus, the home run king and Hall of Famer; and Hank himself, steadfast son, teammate, and father.”—Larry Tye, New York Times bestselling author of Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend
 
“The best and most important biography ever written about Hank Greenberg....Well written, deeply sensitive, and thoroughly researched.”—Glenn Stout, author of Fenway 1912
 
“Rosengren’s copious research offers new insights into the hurdles that Hank Greenberg faced, as well as his tenacity as a player and bravery during World War II that made him the hero of heroes.”—Aviva Kempner, director of The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg 
Library Journal
On one level this is a traditional sports biography. We learn of great Detroit Tiger player Greenberg’s life in baseball, especially his 1937 quest to top Lou Gehrig’s American League record for RBIs in a season (he fell one short) and to best Babe Ruth’s major league home run record (he missed by two). Of more importance, this account of Hank (born Hyman) Greenberg’s life is a reminder that bigotry is an equal opportunity monster. Few today recall that, in 1930’s America, Jews were seen as “others” and scorned almost as much as African Americans were. Greenberg became an icon for American Jews and filled that role with dignity, going about his business effectively and fighting when treated unjustly. This is what made him “the hero of heroes.”
VERDICT Rosengren’s well-written book is recommended to all fans looking for a full Greenberg biography to complement Mark Kurlansky’s entry in Yale University Press’s “Jewish Lives” series, or Greenberg’s own autobiography, The Story of My Life , written with Ira Berkow. This should also appeal to readers seeking to learn about social justice. [See also LJ baseball reviewer Robert C. Cottrell’s Two Pioneers: How Hank Greenberg and Jackie Robinson Transformed Baseball—And America.—Ed.] —JB

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
A veteran sportswriter fondly recalls the life of "the greatest Jewish ballplayer of all time." While not the first Jew to play major league baseball--and Sandy Koufax fans will argue he wasn't the greatest--Hank Greenberg (1911–1986) was the first to succeed spectacularly, paving the way for Jews in the national pastime as Jackie Robinson did for African-Americans. In this cradle-to-grave biography, Rosengren (Journalism/Univ. of Minnesota; Hammerin' Hank, George Almighty and the Say Hey Kid, 2008, etc.) pays particular attention to Greenberg's playing days, to his towering achievements in the game, to the 47-month chunk of his prime lost to World War II and to his later career as a baseball executive. We learn, as well, about the man: his devotion to his parents, his tireless work ethic, his modesty, his short fuse and his popularity with the ladies. Though not especially devout, the "Jewish Babe Ruth" famously refused to play on Yom Kippur in 1934, a decision that simultaneously chanced the ridicule of gentiles and signaled to Jews that tradition need not be wholly sacrificed to assimilation. The slugger fully understood his symbolic role, the feature of Greenberg's story that most clearly engages Rosengren. During this feared hitter's heyday--a time when Hitler assumed power in Germany, when the KKK thrived in America's South, Detroit's own Henry Ford was the nation's best known anti-Semite, "an age when Jews were considered weak, unathletic and impotent,"--Greenberg emerged as a powerful figure, an accomplished and unapologetic ethnic standard-bearer. Rosengren traces the steps toward Greenberg's triumph, vividly reminding us of his hard-earned, path-breaking role. A sensitive look at the cultural impact of the man who once was "the face of Judaism in America."

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101614921
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/05/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
File size:
5 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Rosengren pens a textured tale—of Henry Greenberg, the Moses of Baseball; Hankus Spankus, the home run king and Hall of Famer; and Hank himself, steadfast son, teammate and father. This is a book for those who don't know this Hero of Heroes and, much more, for those who think they do."—Larry Tye, New York Times bestselling author of Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend

“Greenberg became an icon for American Jews and filled that role with dignity… Rosengren’s well-written book is recommended to all fans."—Library Journal

 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >