Hannibal [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

Hannibal [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

4.5 11
by Hans Zimmer
     
 

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Academy Award-winning composer Hans Zimmer (The Lion King) is on a roll. In 2001, the composer -- who previously garnered Oscar nominations for Rain Man and As Good as It Gets -- was nominated once again for his visceral Gladiator score. Also in '01, Zimmer worked his magic on the eerie score to The Silence of the Lambs sequelSee more details below

Overview

Academy Award-winning composer Hans Zimmer (The Lion King) is on a roll. In 2001, the composer -- who previously garnered Oscar nominations for Rain Man and As Good as It Gets -- was nominated once again for his visceral Gladiator score. Also in '01, Zimmer worked his magic on the eerie score to The Silence of the Lambs sequel Hannibal. As with Gladiator, Zimmer's music for Hannibal both enriches the film's tension-filled action and makes for satisfying listening on its own. In Maestro Zimmer, Hannibal the Cannibal has met his match -- at least artistically. The soundtrack begins with Sir Anthony Hopkins, who portrays the carnivorous serial killer Hannibal Lecter, rendering a sardonic, deliciously whispered reading of his letter to FBI Agent Clarice Starling (Julianne Moore) that bleeds into the music. His voice pulls the listener into a subdued orchestral piece that quietly builds in intensity. By imaginatively juxtaposing a passage from Glenn Gould's legendary performance of Bach's sunny Goldberg Variations with brooding orchestration, Zimmer proves to be brilliantly in synch with the cunningly mathematical intricacies of Hannibal's twisted mind. In the same creepy vain is "For a Small Stipend," which sends chills up the spine through the spare plinking of piano keys. "I keep telling everyone this is a romantic comedy, but nobody believes me," Zimmer has said of Hannibal. Well, we’re not sure how funny the gory film is, but for all its scariness and bloodcurdling suspense, Zimmer’s Hannibal score certainly qualifies as hauntingly romantic. Andrew Velez

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
Hannibal, director Ridley Scott's follow-up to Jonathan Demme's The Silence of the Lambs, is a very different work from its predecessor. A mystery/thriller, The Silence of the Lambs focused on the tense exchanges between a highly intelligent serial killer and a novice FBI agent in an American prison, and Howard Shore's score echoed the film's claustrophobic, subterranean settings. In Hannibal, the killer, Dr. Hannibal "the Cannibal" Lecter, is at large, living in Florence, though he eventually returns to the U.S. for his confrontation with his old nemesis. Appropriately, Hans Zimmer has created a score steeped in classical influences, particularly Italian opera. Using fast-tempo percussion and haunting sweeps of strings, plus a boys choir, he underscores the film's suspenseful moments, but only in a few passages, notably during "Let My Home Be My Gallows," which accompanies Lecter's encounter with an Italian police inspector, does the soundtrack include portions of the film's moments of outright horror. Zimmer's work is augmented by other classical and pseudo-classical pieces: Glenn Gould's "Aria da Capo" from Bach's Goldberg Variations; Klaus Badelt's "Gourmet Valse Tartare," a waltz reminiscent of Johann Strauss' "The Blue Danube"; "Firenze Di Notte" by Martin Tillman and Mel Wesson; and Patrick Cassidy's "Vide Cor Meum," a piece of opera pastiche featuring Danielle De Niese and Bruno Lazzaretti and set to a text by Dante. Anthony Hopkins, who plays Lecter, is featured speaking excerpts from his literary lectures as a library curator and reciting a letter to the FBI agent filled with his character's black humor. With its emphasis on the film's classical pretensions, the soundtrack gives only a mild sense of the violent aspects of the movie, though Zimmer's "For a Small Stipend," with its mixture of synthesized and orchestral music with sound effects, carries some of that tone. Still, listening to the album is a far less disturbing experience than watching the film.

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/06/2001
Label:
Decca
UPC:
0028946769621
catalogNumber:
469696
Rank:
80977

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