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Hannibal: A History of the Art of War Among the Carthaginians and Romans down to the Battle of Pydna, 168 B.C., with a Detailed Account of the Second Punic War
     

Hannibal: A History of the Art of War Among the Carthaginians and Romans down to the Battle of Pydna, 168 B.C., with a Detailed Account of the Second Punic War

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by Theodore Ayrault Dodge
 

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Hannibal is often called the finest general the world has ever known. Setting out from Carthaginian-dominated Spain with a small army of select troops, he fought his way over the Pyrenees and crossed the Alps with elephants and a full baggage train. Theodore Dodge retraced this route from Carthage to Italy, paying particular attention to the famous crossing of the

Overview


Hannibal is often called the finest general the world has ever known. Setting out from Carthaginian-dominated Spain with a small army of select troops, he fought his way over the Pyrenees and crossed the Alps with elephants and a full baggage train. Theodore Dodge retraced this route from Carthage to Italy, paying particular attention to the famous crossing of the Alps, and wrote what remains unequalled as the most comprehensive and readable study of history's greatest general.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781853671470
Publisher:
Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal, Limited
Publication date:
07/01/1993
Pages:
330
Product dimensions:
5.91(w) x 8.94(h) x 1.18(d)

Meet the Author


Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Ayrault Dodge (1842–1909) served in the New York volunteer infantry during the Civil War. His books include Alexander, Hannibal, The Campaign of Chancellorsville, A Bird's Eye View of Our Civil War, Gustavus Adolphus, Cesar,and Napoleon (in four volumes).

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Hannibal (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Conrad_Jalowski More than 1 year ago
Theodore Ayrault Dodge's book on Hannibal starts off with the abjuration of Carthaginian hegemony in Sardinia, Corsica and Sicily after the First Punic War: 264-241 BCE. Hasdrubal Barca of the Barcine family sets off to subjugate as much as Iberia as possible to generate gold, silver and other natural resources as well as to provide a 'center of gravity' within Iberia and to secure the lines of communication and a secure base that would A) provide a key interstices that would administrate Carthaginian suzerainty in Iberia, B) connect Iberia with the Carthaginian network of subjected states and C) to maintain mercantile trade. Theodre Ayrault Dodge mentions that the loss of peripheral zones within the Mediterranean deprived the Carthaginians of a water-route to Rome. (Thankfully Carthage was not a thalassocracy to the extent of the First Athenian Empire: 478-404 BCE and the Second Athenian Empire: 378/377-355 BCE; it still survived after the majority of its navy was wiped out and its maritime supremacy extinguished.)

Theodore Ayrault Dodge elucidates Hannibal Barca's ultracrepidation across the Rhone River and the Alps, and the hardships that were faced by trying to reach Italian soil. Theodore Ayrault Dodge succinctly mentions the poliorcetics of Saguntum: 219-218 BCE and the battles of Ticinus: 218 BCE, Trebia: 217 BCE, Lake Trasimene: 217 BCE and Cannae: 216 BCE with the culmination of the fate of the two empires at Zama: 202 BCE. Theodore Ayrault Dodge mentions the grand strategy of Hannibal Barca (to deprive the Romans of their Italian allies and to form a stranglehold against the capitol of Rome, and to enlist the aid of the Gallic tribes) and the composition of the Carthaginian armies (Libyo-Phoenicians, Iberians, Numidians: multinational composition of mercenaries; 1,043 peltasts or skirmishers in the front ranks, 2,048 psiloi or auxiliary soldiers in the rear and a Hellenistic-like phalanx of Carthaginian/Libyo-Phoenician pikemen, with a total of 1,024 cavalry per fighting force.) Theodore Ayrault Dodge also mentions the composition of the Roman forces which consisted of 1,200 Velites, 1,200 Hastati, 1,200 Principes and 600 Triarii per consular army (a total of two such fighting forces per year). He also mentions the siege techniques of antiquity such as the means of blockading and slowly depleting the resources of the enemy through the castrametation of two concentric walls: the circumvallation and the contravallation.

The only negative factor found in the book Hannibal by Theodore Ayrault Dodge is the balance of the book. The author does not give enough recognition for the exploits of Hannibal's rivals such as Fabius 'Cunctator', Metellus and Nero, as well as Publius Cornelius Scipio 'Africanus' who deprived the Carthaginians of a base in Iberia through the victories at Baecula and Ilipa, and the capture of New Carthage. Theodore Ayrault Dodge tends to degrade the capabilities of Hannibal's Roman enemies, and to belittle the strategic consequences of some of their exploits such as the capture of Syracuse and the loss of Carthaginian hegemony in Iberia. (For more on Scipio 'Africanus', the book by Basil Henry Liddell Hart is recommended.)
Guest More than 1 year ago
An amazing novel that gives you colorful explanations of both armies of Rome ,and Carthage. There are also great teachings of both nations powerful history. Loved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago