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Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales

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Overview

The everlasting tales of this favorite storyteller are celebrated in this colorful compendium. Eight stories such as Silly Hans, The Ugly Duckling, Thumbelina, and The Princess and the Pea are each illustrated by a different artist in full color.

Twelve tales including "The Princess and the Pea," "Thumbelina," "The Happy Family," and "The Goblin at the Grocer's."

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Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales

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Overview

The everlasting tales of this favorite storyteller are celebrated in this colorful compendium. Eight stories such as Silly Hans, The Ugly Duckling, Thumbelina, and The Princess and the Pea are each illustrated by a different artist in full color.

Twelve tales including "The Princess and the Pea," "Thumbelina," "The Happy Family," and "The Goblin at the Grocer's."

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zwerger, who has illustrated several Andersen tales as individual picture books, here presents an oversized storybook collection of eight, ranging from the readily familiar (``The Emperor's New Clothes''; ``The Princess and the Pea'') to others that will be new to many readers (``The Rose Tree Regiment''; ``The Jumpers''). She provides a few full-page pictures, at most, for each--just enough to sketch a character, suggest a scene and offer a jumping-off point for the reader's vision. Her lines are characteristically dainty, her palette strong and true--a combination reminiscent of the color plates that frequently embellished texts of yore. Noted translator Bell's retellings are literal and literary, with a leisurely, somewhat old-fashioned feeling created by long, lyrical sentences and descriptions and frequent exclamations and addresses to the reader; they are a fitting match for Zwerger's elegant style. The opening selection, ``The Sandman,'' is, unfortunately, the longest, most rambling and diffuse, and the most clearly European; but after this somewhat difficult beginning, the collection opens a rich world to the reader willing to invest time and imagination in these classic renditions. Ages 4-up. (Nov.)
Children's Literature
Eleven fairy tales charmingly illustrated and practically formatted allow for ceaseless reading at bedtime, nap time, whenever time. Not all the tales are well-known, which lends to the beauty of this book—there are some surprises. Read your favorite first, then discover the unusual, lesser known tales of this Danish teller of tales. Zwerger's watercolor and ink decorations enhance the text that Andersen would be proud of, as this is published in celebration of his 200th birthday. Reminiscent of early to mid 20th century illustrations, she captures the essence of each story, yet leaves enough to the imagination, inspiring creativity not always presented in a collection such as this. The choice of tales is a wise one; from the familiar "The Princess and the Pea," "The Emperor's New Clothes," and "Thumbeline" to the not so familiar "The Jumpers," "The Sandman," and "The Rose Tree Regiment," as well as the somewhat familiar "The Swineherd," "The Tinderbox," and "The Little Match Girl." Readers are exposed to the best of this classic author, leaving them curious for more and thirsty for fairy tales. 2006 (orig. 1991), Minedition Book/Penguin, Ages 4 to 8.
—Elizabeth Young
School Library Journal
Gr 4 Up-- This handsome edition, containing eight stories, has a few old favorites and some lesser-known tales that can only be found in complete anthologies. Bell's translations are crisp, offering Andersen's wry observations and romantic prose in clean, precise English. The book is asethetically pleasing--long and narrow, with thick, creamy white pages; a fine typeface; and plenty of white space framing text and illustration. Zwerger's elegant pencil-and-watercolor illustrations are typically restrained in palette, utilizing mostly earthen tones. Her compositions are classically balanced, with uncluttered backgrounds, and realistic characters, costumed fancifully. Each story begins with a simple headpiece decoration and is accompanied by one or more plates. A lovely volume. --Karen K. Radtke, Milwaukee Public Library
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780448022420
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/1/1970
  • Series: Grow-up Books Series
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Hans Christian Andersen

Lisbeth Zwerger lives in Vienna, Austria.

Biography

Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875) was born in Odense, Denmark, to a poor family. He left home as a 14-year-old to seek his fortune at the theatre in Copenhagen. Andersen began writing plays and poetry before he left for Copenhagen, but it was not until 1835 that he published the first of the fairytales that would bring him international renown. Since then, his over 200 fairytales have enjoyed undiminished popularity, providing the basis for favorite American interpretations such as Disney's The Little Mermaid.

Biography courtesy of HarperCollins

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    1. Date of Birth:
      April 2, 1805
    2. Place of Birth:
      Odense, Denmark
    1. Date of Death:
      August 4, 1875
    2. Place of Death:
      Copenhagen, Denmark

Read an Excerpt

Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales


By Hans Christian Andersen

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4804-7691-2



CHAPTER 1

THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES


Many years ago, there was an Emperor, who was so excessively fond of new clothes, that he spent all his money in dress. He did not trouble himself in the least about his soldiers; nor did he care to go either to the theatre or the chase, except for the opportunities then afforded him for displaying his new clothes. He had a different suit for each hour of the day; and as of any other king or emperor, one is accustomed to say, "he is sitting in council," it was always said of him, "The Emperor is sitting in his wardrobe."

Time passed merrily in the large town which was his capital; strangers arrived every day at the court. One day, two rogues, calling themselves weavers, made their appearance. They gave out that they knew how to weave stuffs of the most beautiful colors and elaborate patterns, the clothes manufactured from which should have the wonderful property of remaining invisible to everyone who was unfit for the office he held, or who was extraordinarily simple in character.

"These must, indeed, be splendid clothes!" thought the Emperor. "Had I such a suit, I might at once find out what men in my realms are unfit for their office, and also be able to distinguish the wise from the foolish! This stuff must be woven for me immediately." And he caused large sums of money to be given to both the weavers in order that they might begin their work directly.

So the two pretended weavers set up two looms, and affected to work very busily, though in reality they did nothing at all. They asked for the most delicate silk and the purest gold thread; put both into their own knapsacks; and then continued their pretended work at the empty looms until late at night.

"I should like to know how the weavers are getting on with my cloth," said the Emperor to himself, after some little time had elapsed; he was, however, rather embarrassed, when he remembered that a simpleton, or one unfit for his office, would be unable to see the manufacture. To be sure, he thought he had nothing to risk in his own person; but yet, he would prefer sending somebody else, to bring him intelligence about the weavers, and their work, before he troubled himself in the affair. All the people throughout the city had heard of the wonderful property the cloth was to possess; and all were anxious to learn how wise, or how ignorant, their neighbors might prove to be.

"I will send my faithful old minister to the weavers," said the Emperor at last, after some deliberation, "he will be best able to see how the cloth looks; for he is a man of sense, and no one can be more suitable for his office than he is."

So the faithful old minister went into the hall, where the knaves were working with all their might, at their empty looms. "What can be the meaning of this?" thought the old man, opening his eyes very wide. "I cannot discover the least bit of thread on the looms." However, he did not express his thoughts aloud.

The impostors requested him very courteously to be so good as to come nearer their looms; and then asked him whether the design pleased him, and whether the colors were not very beautiful; at the same time pointing to the empty frames. The poor old minister looked and looked, he could not discover anything on the looms, for a very good reason, viz: there was nothing there. "What!" thought he again. "Is it possible that I am a simpleton? I have never thought so myself; and no one must know it now if I am so. Can it be, that I am unfit for my office? No, that must not be said either. I will never confess that I could not see the stuff."

"Well, Sir Minister!" said one of the knaves, still pretending to work. "You do not say whether the stuff pleases you."

"Oh, it is excellent!" replied the old minister, looking at the loom through his spectacles. "This pattern, and the colors, yes, I will tell the Emperor without delay, how very beautiful I think them."

"We shall be much obliged to you," said the impostors, and then they named the different colors and described the pattern of the pretended stuff. The old minister listened attentively to their words, in order that he might repeat them to the Emperor; and then the knaves asked for more silk and gold, saying that it was necessary to complete what they had begun. However, they put all that was given them into their knapsacks; and continued to work with as much apparent diligence as before at their empty looms.

The Emperor now sent another officer of his court to see how the men were getting on, and to ascertain whether the cloth would soon be ready. It was just the same with this gentleman as with the minister; he surveyed the looms on all sides, but could see nothing at all but the empty frames.

"Does not the stuff appear as beautiful to you, as it did to my lord the minister?" asked the impostors of the Emperor's second ambassador; at the same time making the same gestures as before, and talking of the design and colors which were not there.

"I certainly am not stupid!" thought the messenger. "It must be, that I am not fit for my good, profitable office! That is very odd; however, no one shall know anything about it." And accordingly he praised the stuff he could not see, and declared that he was delighted with both colors and patterns. "Indeed, please your Imperial Majesty," said he to his sovereign when he returned, "the cloth which the weavers are preparing is extraordinarily magnificent."

The whole city was talking of the splendid cloth which the Emperor had ordered to be woven at his own expense.

And now the Emperor himself wished to see the costly manufacture, while it was still in the loom. Accompanied by a select number of officers of the court, among whom were the two honest men who had already admired the cloth, he went to the crafty impostors, who, as soon as they were aware of the Emperor's approach, went on working more diligently than ever; although they still did not pass a single thread through the looms.

"Is not the work absolutely magnificent?" said the two officers of the crown, already mentioned. "If your Majesty will only be pleased to look at it! What a splendid design! What glorious colors!" and at the same time they pointed to the empty frames; for they imagined that everyone else could see this exquisite piece of workmanship.

"How is this?" said the Emperor to himself. "I can see nothing! This is indeed a terrible affair! Am I a simpleton, or am I unfit to be an Emperor? That would be the worst thing that could happen—Oh! the cloth is charming," said he, aloud. "It has my complete approbation." And he smiled most graciously, and looked closely at the empty looms; for on no account would he say that he could not see what two of the officers of his court had praised so much. All his retinue now strained their eyes, hoping to discover something on the looms, but they could see no more than the others; nevertheless, they all exclaimed, "Oh, how beautiful!" and advised his majesty to have some new clothes made from this splendid material, for the approaching procession. "Magnificent! Charming! Excellent!" resounded on all sides; and everyone was uncommonly gay. The Emperor shared in the general satisfaction; and presented the impostors with the riband of an order of knighthood, to be worn in their button-holes, and the title of "Gentlemen Weavers."

The rogues sat up the whole of the night before the day on which the procession was to take place, and had sixteen lights burning, so that everyone might see how anxious they were to finish the Emperor's new suit. They pretended to roll the cloth off the looms; cut the air with their scissors; and sewed with needles without any thread in them. "See!" cried they, at last. "The Emperor's new clothes are ready!"

And now the Emperor, with all the grandees of his court, came to the weavers; and the rogues raised their arms, as if in the act of holding something up, saying, "Here are your Majesty's trousers! Here is the scarf! Here is the mantle! The whole suit is as light as a cobweb; one might fancy one has nothing at all on, when dressed in it; that, however, is the great virtue of this delicate cloth."

"Yes indeed!" said all the courtiers, although not one of them could see anything of this exquisite manufacture.

"If your Imperial Majesty will be graciously pleased to take off your clothes, we will fit on the new suit, in front of the looking glass."

The Emperor was accordingly undressed, and the rogues pretended to array him in his new suit; the Emperor turning round, from side to side, before the looking glass.

"How splendid his Majesty looks in his new clothes, and how well they fit!" everyone cried out. "What a design! What colors! These are indeed royal robes!"

"The canopy which is to be borne over your Majesty, in the procession, is waiting," announced the chief master of the ceremonies.

"I am quite ready," answered the Emperor. "Do my new clothes fit well?" asked he, turning himself round again before the looking glass, in order that he might appear to be examining his handsome suit.

The lords of the bedchamber, who were to carry his Majesty's train felt about on the ground, as if they were lifting up the ends of the mantle; and pretended to be carrying something; for they would by no means betray anything like simplicity, or unfitness for their office.

So now the Emperor walked under his high canopy in the midst of the procession, through the streets of his capital; and all the people standing by, and those at the windows, cried out, "Oh! How beautiful are our Emperor's new clothes! What a magnificent train there is to the mantle; and how gracefully the scarf hangs!" in short, no one would allow that he could not see these much-admired clothes; because, in doing so, he would have declared himself either a simpleton or unfit for his office. Certainly, none of the Emperor's various suits, had ever made so great an impression, as these invisible ones.

"But the Emperor has nothing at all on!" said a little child.

"Listen to the voice of innocence!" exclaimed his father; and what the child had said was whispered from one to another.

"But he has nothing at all on!" at last cried out all the people. The Emperor was vexed, for he knew that the people were right; but he thought the procession must go on now! And the lords of the bedchamber took greater pains than ever, to appear holding up a train, although, in reality, there was no train to hold.

CHAPTER 2

THE SWINEHERD


There was once a poor prince, who had a kingdom. His kingdom was very small, but still quite large enough to marry upon; and he wished to marry.

It was certainly rather cool of him to say to the Emperor's daughter, "Will you have me?" But so he did; for his name was renowned far and wide; and there were a hundred princesses who would have answered, "Yes!" and "Thank you kindly." We shall see what this princess said.

Listen!

It happened that where the Prince's father lay buried, there grew a rose tree—a most beautiful rose tree, which blossomed only once in every five years, and even then bore only one flower, but that was a rose! It smelt so sweet that all cares and sorrows were forgotten by him who inhaled its fragrance.

And furthermore, the Prince had a nightingale, who could sing in such a manner that it seemed as though all sweet melodies dwelt in her little throat. So the Princess was to have the rose, and the nightingale; and they were accordingly put into large silver caskets, and sent to her.

The Emperor had them brought into a large hall, where the Princess was playing at "Visiting," with the ladies of the court; and when she saw the caskets with the presents, she clapped her hands for joy.

"Ah, if it were but a little pussy-cat!" said she; but the rose tree, with its beautiful rose came to view.

"Oh, how prettily it is made!" said all the court ladies.

"It is more than pretty," said the Emperor, "it is charming!"

But the Princess touched it, and was almost ready to cry.

"Fie, papa!" said she. "It is not made at all, it is natural!"

"Let us see what is in the other casket, before we get into a bad humor," said the Emperor. So the nightingale came forth and sang so delightfully that at first no one could say anything ill-humored of her.

"Superbe! Charmant!" exclaimed the ladies; for they all used to chatter French, each one worse than her neighbor.

"How much the bird reminds me of the musical box that belonged to our blessed Empress," said an old knight. "Oh yes! These are the same tones, the same execution."

"Yes! yes!" said the Emperor, and he wept like a child at the remembrance.

"I will still hope that it is not a real bird," said the Princess.

"Yes, it is a real bird," said those who had brought it. "Well then let the bird fly," said the Princess; and she positively refused to see the Prince.

However, he was not to be discouraged; he daubed his face over brown and black; pulled his cap over his ears, and knocked at the door.

"Good day to my lord, the Emperor!" said he. "Can I have employment at the palace?"

"Why, yes," said the Emperor. "I want some one to take care of the pigs, for we have a great many of them."

So the Prince was appointed "Imperial Swineherd." He had a dirty little room close by the pigsty; and there he sat the whole day, and worked. By the evening he had made a pretty little kitchen-pot. Little bells were hung all round it; and when the pot was boiling, these bells tinkled in the most charming manner, and played the old melody,

"Ach! du lieber Augustin,
Alles ist weg, weg, weg!"


But what was still more curious, whoever held his finger in the smoke of the kitchen-pot, immediately smelt all the dishes that were cooking on every hearth in the city—this, you see, was something quite different from the rose.

Now the Princess happened to walk that way; and when she heard the tune, she stood quite still, and seemed pleased; for she could play "Lieber Augustine"; it was the only piece she knew; and she played it with one finger.

"Why there is my piece," said the Princess. "That swineherd must certainly have been well educated! Go in and ask him the price of the instrument."

So one of the court-ladies must run in; however, she drew on wooden slippers first.

"What will you take for the kitchen-pot?" said the lady.

"I will have ten kisses from the Princess," said the swineherd.

"Yes, indeed!" said the lady.

"I cannot sell it for less," rejoined the swineherd.

"He is an impudent fellow!" said the Princess, and she walked on; but when she had gone a little way, the bells tinkled so prettily

"Ach! du lieber Augustin,
Alles ist weg, weg, weg!"


"Stay," said the Princess. "Ask him if he will have ten kisses from the ladies of my court."

"No, thank you!" said the swineherd. "Ten kisses from the Princess, or I keep the kitchen-pot myself."

"That must not be, either!" said the Princess. "But do you all stand before me that no one may see us."

And the court-ladies placed themselves in front of her, and spread out their dresses—the swineherd got ten kisses, and the Princess—the kitchen-pot.

That was delightful! The pot was boiling the whole evening, and the whole of the following day. They knew perfectly well what was cooking at every fire throughout the city, from the chamberlain's to the cobbler's; the court-ladies danced and clapped their hands.

"We know who has soup, and who has pancakes for dinner to-day, who has cutlets, and who has eggs. How interesting!"

"Yes, but keep my secret, for I am an Emperor's daughter."

The swineherd—that is to say—the Prince, for no one knew that he was other than an ill-favored swineherd, let not a day pass without working at something; he at last constructed a rattle, which, when it was swung round, played all the waltzes and jig tunes, which have ever been heard since the creation of the world.

"Ah, that is superbe!" said the Princess when she passed by. "I have never heard prettier compositions! Go in and ask him the price of the instrument; but mind, he shall have no more kisses!"

"He will have a hundred kisses from the Princess!" said the lady who had been to ask.

"I think he is not in his right senses!" said the Princess, and walked on, but when she had gone a little way, she stopped again. "One must encourage art," said she, "I am the Emperor's daughter. Tell him he shall, as on yesterday, have ten kisses from me, and may take the rest from the ladies of the court."

"Oh—but we should not like that at all!" said they. "What are you muttering?" asked the Princess. "If I can kiss him, surely you can. Remember that you owe everything to me." So the ladies were obliged to go to him again.

"A hundred kisses from the Princess," said he, "or else let everyone keep his own!"

"Stand round!" said she; and all the ladies stood round her whilst the kissing was going on.

"What can be the reason for such a crowd close by the pigsty?" said the Emperor, who happened just then to step out on the balcony; he rubbed his eyes, and put on his spectacles. "They are the ladies of the court; I must go down and see what they are about!" So he pulled up his slippers at the heel, for he had trodden them down.

As soon as he had got into the court-yard, he moved very softly, and the ladies were so much engrossed with counting the kisses, that all might go on fairly, that they did not perceive the Emperor. He rose on his tiptoes.

"What is all this?" said he, when he saw what was going on, and he boxed the Princess's ears with his slipper, just as the swineherd was taking the eighty-sixth kiss.

"March out!" said the Emperor, for he was very angry; and both Princess and swineherd were thrust out of the city.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen. Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES,
THE SWINEHERD,
THE REAL PRINCESS,
THE SHOES OF FORTUNE,
THE FIR TREE,
THE SNOW QUEEN,
THE LEAP-FROG,
THE ELDERBUSH,
THE BELL,
THE OLD HOUSE,
THE HAPPY FAMILY,
THE STORY OF A MOTHER,
THE FALSE COLLAR,
THE SHADOW,
THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL,
THE DREAM OF LITTLE TUK,
THE NAUGHTY BOY,
THE RED SHOES,

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

4 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 15, 2011

    Disappointed!

    There is no table of contents or an option to skip a story. Oh, and there are no illustrations... bummer. The .99 cents nook book I downloaded a sample of has the TOC, so do I feel cheated! Not worth it. Sorry.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2014

    Yes

    I love it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2014

    To:A

    I LOVED IT ~Jade

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2014

    To A

    LOVED IT!!!- oliva &hearts

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    To A

    Love it!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    DEVON

    I LOVE IT!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    Devon's Harry Styles Imagine Part One ♥ A

    "Wha-ho-whe-what?!" I yell. "Yo. Devs. I have my ways. Or I just won a radio contest." Alicia, who is my best friend EVA, waves the One Direction tickets infront of my face. "And your taking me? Not one of your sisters?" I ask. "Well duh! Lily, Ana, Kayla and Ginger are lame! They don't een like One Direction or thier opening act! By the way, it's still 5 Seconds Of Summer! Maybe Luke will fall in love with me." Alicia sighs. "Did you just suggest..." I trail off. "Yes, Devon. We get to meet 5 Seconds Of Summer and One Direction." Alicia rolls her eyes. "A! This is exciting! When's the concert?" I ask. "Tonight. I already picked out our outfits. I know that you might not like it but whatever." Alicia waves her hand. She hands me ripped skinny jeans, a London, England shirt and high-top blacl Nike's. It's alright. Could be a better outfit but whatever. I get dressed in the bathroom and I come out to see Alicia in black skinny jeans, a Nirvana shirt and black ankle boots. And she looked HOT! "Wow. A! You look amazing. Why don't you have a boyfriend? Or a girlfriend. You are bisexual, right?" I ask. I totally forgot if she is or not. "Yeah, I am. And don't tell Luke. He might not like me if you tell him..." Alicia bites her lip, a habit she has when she's nervous or thinking or lying. But Alicia's not lying. I know when she's lying. "So, when are we going?" I ask. "Uhh... now." Alicia says as she looks at a clock. We rush to Alicia's car and drive. *AFTER THE CONCERT* "Hi, Luke, Calum, Ashton, Michael, Liam, Niall, Harry, Zayn and Louos. Aaah, so many names!" Alicia laughs. She bites her lip. "Hi. You must be Alicia. Who did you bring with you?" Harry says in his ultra-sexy deep and husky voice that makes a girl melt like ice cream on a hot Texas day. Wait, what? "I'm Devon." I whisper. Oh god, I'm so awkward. "Well, Devon, you look nice." Harry smiles and let his dimples show. "And so do you, Alicia." Luke added with a wink. Alicia blushes. She's awkward to. "Thank you, Lu-Luke." Alicia stutters. She must be embarrassed. So I rescue her, like always. "So, we get a little more time then the others, correct?" I ask. You're welcome, Alicia. "That's correct. Alicia, do you want to see the view from here?" Luke blushes a tiny bit. Not to noticable. "Sure." Alicia smiles and takes Luke's out- stretched hand. "Devon, can I have your number?" Harry asks. "Sure." I blush. Yep. Now I know how Alicia feels.********* Hey, Devon. This is your part one. I know it's kind of short but I ran out of idea for the beginning. Sorry. But I hope you like it. &#9829 A

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    Posted October 8, 2010

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