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Happily Ever After: The Book Lover's Treasury of Happy Endings
     

Happily Ever After: The Book Lover's Treasury of Happy Endings

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by Walter Browder
 

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"You are a very fine person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you; but you are only quite a little fellow in a wide world after all!"

"Thank goodness!" said Bilbo laughing, and handed him the tobacco-jar.

From The Hobbit to Heidi, this charming collection of "last pages" is a reminder that, if only in great literature, everything works out in the

Overview

"You are a very fine person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you; but you are only quite a little fellow in a wide world after all!"

"Thank goodness!" said Bilbo laughing, and handed him the tobacco-jar.

From The Hobbit to Heidi, this charming collection of "last pages" is a reminder that, if only in great literature, everything works out in the end.

E. B. White's The Trumpet of the Swan, Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club, Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol, Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House in the Big Woods are all represented in this book. The last paragraph or two of the world's best loved books are brought together in this beautifully packaged gift book which also includes works by C. S. Lewis, Jules Verne, Garrison Keillor, and Celestine Sibley among others.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781418553906
Publisher:
Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
Publication date:
05/29/2005
Sold by:
THOMAS NELSON
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
144
File size:
4 MB

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Happily Ever After

a book lover's treasury of happy endings
By Walter Browder

Rutledge Hill Press

Copyright © 2007 Walter Browder
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-40160-213-0


Chapter One

Aunt Em had just come out of the house to water the cabbages when she looked up and saw Dorothy running toward her.

"My darling child!" she cried, folding the little girl in her arms and covering her face with kisses. "Where in the world did you come from?"

"From the Land of Oz," said Dorothy gravely. "And here is Toto, too. And oh, Aunt Em! I'm so glad to be at home again!"

-L. Frank Baum, The Wizard of Oz

Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did NOT die, he was a second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world. Some people laughed to see the alteration in him, but he let them laugh, and little heeded them; for he was wise enough to know that nothing ever happened on this globe, for good, at which some people did not have their fill of laughter in the outset; and knowing that such as these would be blind anyway, he thought it was as well that they should wrinkle up their eyes in grins, as have the malady in less attractive forms. His own heart laughed; and that was quite enough for him.

He had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon the Total Abstinence Principle, ever afterwards; and it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One!

-Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

"You are a very fine person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you; but you are only quite a little fellow in a wide world after all!"

"Thank goodness!" said Bilbo laughing, and handed him the tobacco-jar.

-J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Laura lay awake a little while, listening to Pa's fiddle softly playing and to the lonely sound of the wind in the Big Woods. She looked at Pa sitting on the bench by the hearth, the fire-light gleaming on his brown hair and beard and glistening on the honey-brown fiddle.

She looked at Ma, gently rocking and knitting.

She thought to herself, "This is now." She was glad that the cosy house, and Pa and Ma and the fire-light and the music, were now. They could not be forgotten, she thought, because now is now. It can never be a long time ago.

-Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House in the Big Woods

My sisters and I stand, arms around each other, laughing and wiping the tears from each other's eyes. The flash of the Polaroid goes off and my father hands me the snapshot. My sisters and I watch quietly together, eager to see what develops.

The gray-green surface changes to the bright colors of our three images, sharpening and deepening all at once. And although we don't speak, I know we all see it: Together we look like our mother. Her same eyes, her same mouth, open in surprise to see, at last, her long- cherished wish.

-Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club

Phileas Fogg had won his wager, and had made his journey around the world in eighty days. To do this he had employed every means of conveyance-steamers, railways, carriages, yachts, trading-vessels, sledges, elephants. The eccentric gentleman had throughout displayed all his marvellous qualities of coolness and exactitude. But what then? What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought back from this long and weary journey?

Nothing, say you? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men!

Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?

-Jules Verne, Around the World in 80 Days

"Yes, Jo, I think your harvest will be a good one," began Mrs. March, frightening away a big black cricket that was staring Teddy out of countenance.

"Not half so good as yours, mother. Here it is, and we never can thank you enough for the patient sowing and reaping you have done," cried Jo, with the loving impetuosity which she never could outgrow.

"I hope there will be more wheat and fewer tares every year," said Amy softly.

"A large sheaf, but I know there's room in your heart for it, Marmee dear," added Meg's tender voice.

Touched to the heart, Mrs. March could only stretch out her arms, as if to gather children and grandchildren to herself, and say, with face and voice full of motherly love, gratitude, and humility-

"O my girls, however long you may live, I never can wish you a greater happiness than this!"

-Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Happily Ever After by Walter Browder Copyright © 2007 by Walter Browder . Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Walter Browder is a screenwriter and author of the critically-acclaimed book The Sand Castle as well as several nonfiction books. He lives with his wife, Sue Ellin, in Willits, California.

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Happily Ever After: The Book Lover's Treasury of Happy Endings 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
iblog4books More than 1 year ago
After reading a bit about Molly in the previous novellas, I was pleased to finally read her story. I had such empathy for her as she faced one struggle after another. And I loved Gage—a true hero! The final story in this collection is the longest and has the feel of a complete book, though I would have been happy to read about Molly and Gage for much longer than the 120 pages that Denise gave me! [5 stars] I received a free copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through Litfuse Publicity in exchange for my fair and honest review.