Happiness Is a Serious Problem

Happiness Is a Serious Problem

4.2 21
by Dennis Prager
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

We are completely satisfied with nothing

There is little correlation between the circumstances of people's lives and how happy they are.

This is the repair manual we should have been handed at birth

When you ask people abouttheir most cherished values in life, "happiness" is always

…  See more details below

Overview

We are completely satisfied with nothing

There is little correlation between the circumstances of people's lives and how happy they are.

This is the repair manual we should have been handed at birth

When you ask people abouttheir most cherished values in life, "happiness" is always at the top of the list. However, unhappiness does not seem to be the exceptional order to be happy, we first have to battle ourselves.

Happiness is an obligation--to yourself and to others

Not only do we have a right to be happy, we have an obligation to be happy. Our happiness has an effect on the lives of everyone around us--it provides them with a positive environment in which to thrive and to be happy themselves.

Editorial Reviews

Wall Street Journal
...[Prager] has an astonishing ability to state simple truths we hadn't heard articulated before, at least not so clearly, in a way that makes their truthfulness immediately and powerfully obvious.
Los Angeles Times
Prager's latest book challenges readers to realize that they—not any outside force—are the greatest obstacle to happiness.
USA Today
...a cogent and thoughtful examination on why human beings have a moral obligation to be happy.
Library Journal
A popular lecturer, Los Angeles radio personality, and former TV talk-show host, Prager has developed a surprising following in today's soundbite media culture. Supporters praise his earnest tone, nonideological opinions, and insistence that his audience think deeply about serious issues. Detractors accuse him of sloppy thinking, intellectual pretentions, and a kind of benevolent, patronizing conservatism. Both sides of Prager are in evidence in his latest offering (after Think a Second Time, ReganBooks, 1995), in which he uses the pursuit of happiness as a central motif but generally instructs in the modern art of self-improvement. The 31 short chapters, with titles like "Find the Positive," "Seeing Yourself as a Victim," and "Psychotherapy and Religion," are more like separate essays, often disconnected and occasionally repetitive. But taken individually, they are cogent, complete, and preach a nonreligious yet morally guided moderation that should appeal across a wide range of patron groups. A fine choice for all public libraries where self-help books are popular.Eric Bryant, "Library Journal"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061744884
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
122,240
File size:
405 KB

Read an Excerpt


Happiness Is a Moral Obligation


We tend to think that we owe it to ourselves to be as happy as we can be. And this is true. But happiness is far more than a personal concern. It is also a moral obligation.

After one of my talks on happiness, a woman in the audience stood up and said, "I only wish my husband had come to this talk." (He had chosen to attend a talk on business instead.) She explained that he was the unhappy one in their relationship and that much as she loved him, it was not easy being married to an unhappy person.

This woman enabled me to put into words what I had been searching for--the altruistic, in addition to the obvious personal, reasons to take happiness seriously. I told the woman and the audience that she was right; her husband should have attended the talk because he had a moral obligation to his daily partner in life to be as happy as he could be.

Upon a moment's reflection, this becomes obvious. We owe it to our husband or wife, our fellow workers, our children, our friends, indeed to everyone who comes into our lives, to be as happy as we can be. This does not mean acting unreal, and it certainly does not mean refraining from honest and intimate expressions of our feelings to those closest to us. But it does mean that we owe it to others to work on our happiness. We do not enjoy being around others who are usually unhappy. Those who enter our lives feel the same way. Ask a child what it was like to grow up with an unhappy parent, or ask parents what pain they suffer if they have an unhappy child (of any age).

There is a second reason why happiness is a moral obligation. In general, people act more decently whenthey are happy. The chapter on seeking goodness explains the connection between goodness and happiness at length. It will suffice here to answer this: Do you feel more positively disposed toward other people and do you want to treat other people better when you are happy or when you are unhappy?

There is yet a third reason. I once asked a deeply religious man if he considered himself a truly pious person. He responded that while he aspired to be one, he felt that he fell short in two areas. One of those areas, he said, was his not being a happy enough person to be considered truly pious.

His point was that unhappy religious people reflect poorly on their religion and on their Creator. He was right; in fact, unhappy religious people pose a real challenge to faith. If their faith is so impressive, why aren't these devoted adherents happy? There are only two possible reasons: either they are not practicing their faith correctly, or they are practicing their faith correctly and the religion itself is not conducive to happiness. Most outsiders assume the latter reason. Unhappy religious people should therefore think about how important being happy is--if not for themselves, then for the sake of their religion. Unhappy, let alone angry, religious people provide more persuasive arguments for atheism and secularism than do all the arguments of atheists.

Read More

What People are saying about this

Rabbi Harold Kushner
"There is perhaps no more important task for a person that the research for happiness, and no more reliable guide in that quest than Dennis Prager."
Brad Stetson
"This is one of those rare books so dense with compelling insight that every page will likely give pause for reflection. (Prager's writing) is unfailingly clear, and expert at demystifying the brew of emotions, desires and thoughts that impair our ability to understand ourselves."

Meet the Author

Dennis Prager writes a syndicated column, hosts a radio show carried by 120 stations, and appears regularly on major Fox venues. He is the author of Happiness Is a Serious Problem and Think a Second Time.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Happiness Is a Serious Problem: A Human Nature Repair Manual 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Kinesiology_grad_student More than 1 year ago
Dennis Prager is an inspirational thinker, writer, and speaker. His clarity of thought, illustrated through his writing, simplifies complex issues and makes them graspable to all people. Each of his chapters on happiness will cause readers to reflect upon how their own thoughts and actions may be hindering their path to contentment and inner peace. Not only does Dennis Prager stimulate self-examination through his writing, his arguments are punctuated with real-life stories and examples, and he provides concrete steps one may take to increase their happiness. It is truly a must-read for every person, happy, sad, or indifferent, to enrich their life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It should be recommended reading for every adult out there. Even the ones who think they know everything! Dennis Prager has very good points of view and thinks everything out. He even show in the book that he is not perfect and has even been unhappy earlier on in life! Wnderful reading!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book should be required reading for every High School senior. Would solve a lot of issues prior to leaving school. Sadly the teachers union would never approve of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well laid out and amazingly helpful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This a a great motivating book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book, but it¿s not exactly what I expected. He does argue from every conceivable angle that our expectations will set us up for disappointment, so I guess I asked for it. Somehow I managed to put ¿The Pursuit of¿ in front of the title because I tend to believe that happiness is a by-product of our service to humanity, but the book is actually about seeking happiness for one self. Mr. Prager does emphasize how we tend to seek happiness in vain through our quests for self-indulgence, and suggests that we seek meaning in our lives. He¿s very logical and reasonable, even if one doesn¿t agree with him on every count, but I don¿t find him to be particularly profound. I agree with him strongly on some points, but there is nothing new in his writing that would have me reconsider my own philosophy, or reflect on how his viewpoint might reflect a truth in my own experience.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Simple, easy concepts that are logical. Excellent read for my psychotherapy patients who need help getting happiness or even contentment back into their lives.