Harbinger Of Sequestered Intent

Overview

The dissertation begins by exploring specific issues in the history of Western philosophy, in particular the theory of language that underlies speculation about the possibility of ideographic writing. Starting with the China Illustrata of Athanasius Kircher, the first chapter proceeds to archaeo-historically excavate Kircher's language-theoretical sources and influences ultimately reaching all the way back to the intellectual-historical origins of ideography in the texts of Aristotle and Plato. The second chapter...
See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

The dissertation begins by exploring specific issues in the history of Western philosophy, in particular the theory of language that underlies speculation about the possibility of ideographic writing. Starting with the China Illustrata of Athanasius Kircher, the first chapter proceeds to archaeo-historically excavate Kircher's language-theoretical sources and influences ultimately reaching all the way back to the intellectual-historical origins of ideography in the texts of Aristotle and Plato. The second chapter examines traditional Chinese discussions of language (including the origin and function of writing), focusing on two ancient dictionaries: the Erya and the Shuowen jiezi. This chapter explains just how different pre-modern Chinese language theory is from Western ideographic speculation including the stark contrast between the Erya and such works as Peter Mark Roget's eponymous Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases. The vast difference between the two, simply stated, is that traditional Chinese theory requires quotidian human intent and concrete socio-historical embeddedness for linguistic meaning to function, whereas traditional Western theory requires reified, universal, transhistorical, perhaps even extraterrestrial Forms ( eide, ideai)---what Derrida and others have called the "transcendental signifieds." The third chapter carries these language-theoretical issues to an examination of the work of the scribe Sima Qian (145-87 B.C.E.), who laid the cornerstone of author-theory in China. Forcibly castrated by the emperor for a crime he did not commit, consumed by humiliation and rage, Sima Qian proceeded to compile the monumental 130 chapter Records of the Scribe, one of the most sophisticated and politically provocative documents in the history Chinese letters a text that ended up serving as the model for all subsequent historiography as well as biographical and autobiographical writing, prose fiction, and even much literary theory and criticism. The larger implication of the dissertation is that a better understanding of the differences in how the Chinese and Western traditions have discussed language, particularly how linguistic meaning functions, may well help to lead contemporary (posthumanist) theory to a more nuanced and culturally inclusive view of authorial intention.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781244614468
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/30/2011
  • Pages: 626
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 1.26 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)