Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music 1955-1965 / Edition 1 by David H. Rosenthal | 9780199879748 | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music 1955-1965

Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music 1955-1965

by David H. Rosenthal
     
 

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It's nineteen fifty-something, in a dark, cramped, smoke-filled room. Everyone's wearing black. And on-stage a tenor is blowing his heart out, a searching, jagged saxophone journey played out against a moody, walking bass and the swish of a drummer's brushes. To a great many listeners--from African American aficionados of the period to a whole new group of fans today

Overview

It's nineteen fifty-something, in a dark, cramped, smoke-filled room. Everyone's wearing black. And on-stage a tenor is blowing his heart out, a searching, jagged saxophone journey played out against a moody, walking bass and the swish of a drummer's brushes. To a great many listeners--from African American aficionados of the period to a whole new group of fans today--this is the very embodiment of jazz. It is also quintessential hard bop. In this, the first thorough study of the subject, jazz expert and enthusiast David H. Rosenthal vividly examines the roots, traditions, explorations and permutations, personalities and recordings of a climactic period in jazz history. Beginning with hard bop's origins as an amalgam of bebop and R&B, Rosenthal narrates the growth of a movement that embraced the heavy beat and bluesy phrasing of such popular artists as Horace Silver and Cannonball Adderley; the stark, astringent, tormented music of saxophonists Jackie McLean and Tina Brooks; the gentler, more lyrical contributions of trumpeter Art Farmer, pianists Hank Jones and Tommy Flanagan, composers Benny Golson and Gigi Gryce; and such consciously experimental and truly one-of-a-kind players and composers as Andrew Hill, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, and Charles Mingus. Hard bop welcomed all influences--whether Gospel, the blues, Latin rhythms, or Debussy and Ravel--into its astonishingly creative, hard-swinging orbit. Although its emphasis on expression and downright "badness" over technical virtuosity was unappreciated by critics, hard bop was the music of black neighborhoods and the last jazz movement to attract the most talented young black musicians. Fortunately, records were there to catch it all. The years between 1955 and 1965 are unrivaled in jazz history for the number of milestones on vinyl. Miles Davis's Kind of Blue, Charles Mingus's Mingus Ah Um, Thelonious Monk's Brilliant Corners, Horace Silver's Further Explorations--Rosenthal gives a perceptive cut-by-cut analysis of these and other jazz masterpieces, supplying an essential discography as well. For knowledgeable jazz-lovers and novices alike, Hard Bop is a lively, multi-dimensional, much-needed examination of the artists, the milieus, and above all the sounds of one of America's great musical epochs.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Hard bop, the mid-1950s resurgence of bebop, was an eclectic movement that encompassed many diverse styles of music, as Rosenthal ( Loves of the Poets ) spiritedly demonstrates here. His encyclopedic overview covers the accomplishments of the jazz ``greats'' of the period, from the lyrical compositions of Benny Golson and Gigi Gryce, the soul jazz of saxophonist Stanley Turrentine and the ``bad'' trumpet of Lee Morgan to the heterodox talents of Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Miles Davis and John Coltrane. Relating hard bop to gospel, blues and black popular traditions, the study emphasizes its roots in the dark, sinister mood of ghettos and discusses its demise after the 1960s as many blacks joined the middle class, moved out of inner cities and were increasingly influenced by white culture. Lively prose and perceptive characterization of musicians and their performances make the book a welcome resource for jazz fans and music historians. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Arguing that the decade of ``hard bop'' was one of the most creative in jazz, Rosenthal analyzes the contributions of many well-known musicians like Horace Silver and Sonny Rollins, and lesser-known but also important figures including Tadd Dameron and Elmo Hope. Rosenthal thinks through his material carefully and develops interesting and defensible ideas. He uses major recordings and jazz books as guideposts, drawing from music theory and jazz history where appropriate. Readers will find this well-written and open-minded study authoritative yet friendly--a refreshingly nonpartisan evaluation that mines a rich vein of music. It's apparently the first book-length study of an exciting decade and will appeal to anyone interested in jazz.-- Paul Baker, CUNA Inc., Madison, Wis.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199879748
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
09/09/1993
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

A free-lance jazz critic, David H. Rosenthal was also a poet, literary critic, journalist, and translator of Catalan and Portuguese literature. His articles on music have appeared in Down Beat, JazzTimes, Keyboard, the Village Voice, and other publications.

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