Hard Revolution (Derek Strange & Terry Quinn Series #4)

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In this epic showdown from "one of the best crime novelists alive" (Dennis Lehane), police rookie Derek Strange tries to help his brother, a Vietnam vet with a disability pension and a drug problem. But Washington, D.C., like the rest of the country, soon reels from the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Hard Revolution (Derek Strange & Terry Quinn Series #4)

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Overview

In this epic showdown from "one of the best crime novelists alive" (Dennis Lehane), police rookie Derek Strange tries to help his brother, a Vietnam vet with a disability pension and a drug problem. But Washington, D.C., like the rest of the country, soon reels from the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
George Pelecanos takes a step back in time to give us a prequel to his bestselling and highly admired Derek Strange P.I. series (Soul Circus, Hell to Pay, Right as Rain), allowing a greater insight into the development of Strange's tough-guy, justice-at-any-cost character.

In 1968, weeks before the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and at the height of the battle for civil rights, Strange is a young black cop new to the police force and partnered with an older white man. By contrast, his brother Dennis is getting deeper into crime as he and some acquaintances plan to knock over a convenience store. Strange's personal issues and family matters take a backseat to the explosive times, as Washington's inner city erupts in riots following Kings' murder.

Pelecanos's vivid, astute, and meaningful narrative makes Hard Revolution an accomplished study of a culture tearing itself to pieces in the face of major social change. The conflicts of the world at large are perfectly represented in the protagonist, as Strange is forced to fight against his brother, neighbors who condemn him for serving the white power structure, and, ultimately himself. It's a true testament to Pelecanos's skill that no single plot element or story thread -- including the senseless murder of a black man by a drunken trio of white bank robbers -- outweighs the others. He uses his adept noir sensibility to further define personal tragedy and its greater symbolic meaning.

The New York Times
Hard Revolution is best appreciated in context, with the adult Derek Strange in sight. It offers a blunt introduction to this enduring character, and a potent one … Mr. Pelecanos writes clean, tight, cogent prose with a heartfelt urgency. However convenient the story's timing may be, it packs a serious punch. — Janet Maslin
The Washington Post
… no one who lives in this city and reads fiction and cares about the world we live in can afford not to read these books. They are reports from front lines that are only a few miles away, unblinking looks at a reality that is all around us, that perhaps we think we have known for years, and yet most often we have never really known at all. — Patrick Anderson
NY Times Sunday Book Review
Pelecanos's foray into Strange's past does not in the end diminish, but rather adds to, our sense of his complexity and humanity. In narrating Derek's buried crime story, Pelecanos has further tapped into an archetypal vein of family experience in the black community since the 1950's, as drugs, murder and prison cut a swath through three generations of young men. But he never loses his delicate, personal touch: close to the novel's end, the adult Derek chooses to sleep once more in his older brother's bed, finding some solace in the last remnants of his scent and presence there. — Anthony Walton
Publishers Weekly
The author's admirers are familiar with middle-aged black PI Derek Strange, featured in several novels (Soul Circus, etc.) so strong that one critic has dubbed Pelecanos the Zola of contemporary crime fiction. This memorable tale is a prequel to those novels, set in Washington, D.C., mostly just before and during the 1968 riots sparked by the killing of Martin Luther King Jr. The first few chapters, though, unfold in 1959, introducing major characters whose paths will entwine later: Derek-who's nabbed for shoplifting but given a break that will set his life on a (more or less) law-abiding path-and his older brother, Dennis; their hardworking parents; and some ancillary figures. By 1968, Derek is a young cop partnered with a white guy; Dennis is a pot-smoking slacker; and many of their acquaintances from '59 are working dead-end jobs with an eye toward crime. The ensuing narrative swirls around two scenarios: a plan by Dennis and two street-thug pals to rob a local Greek-owned store (Pelecanos wrote extensively about D.C.'s Greek community in early novels, and many of the nonblack characters here are Greek-American) and a plot by three young white hoods to rob a bank, but only after they drunkenly kill a young black man for sport. The action is fueled by the heat of race relations, which Pelecanos explores with acuity-particularly in his portrayal of Derek, who as a black cop is considered an enemy by many other blacks. Written in rich, observant prose, the novel is a brilliant study of a society tearing apart as racial tensions escalate after the King killing; no wonder some observers have pointed to Pelecanos as the kind of thriller writer who should be nominated for a National Book Award. 10-city author tour. (Mar. 9) Forecast: Pelecanos's readership continues to grow; expect this to hit the lists. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Pelecanos's fourth Derek Strange novel serves as a prequel to the first three (Right as Rain, Hell To Pay, and Soul Circus), taking the reader back to 1968 to show the development of Strange as both an officer and a man. Strange's older brother, Dennis, has always been the shiftless one, dealing marijuana while spending his nights drinking and getting high. When Dennis hooks up with more serious criminals, the task of salvaging his life falls to Derek. Intertwined with Dennis's criminal involvement is the case of a young black man run over in the street and the efforts of a veteran white cop, Frank Vaughn, to find the killers. Strange and Vaughn are different in many ways, but they are drawn together by a mutual dedication to upholding justice. Pelecanos sets both cases against the backdrop of racial unrest in Washington, DC, brilliantly using his characters and their situations to examine the era's social realities. As with the previous Strange works, this is a superior crime novel from one of the genre's outstanding writers. Recommended for all public libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 11/15/03.]-Craig L. Shufelt, Lane P.L., Oxford, OH Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Pelecanos's latest Extra Dark slice of Washington street crime leaps back a generation to connect the backstory of private eye Derek Strange (Soul Circus, 2003, etc.) to the murder of Martin Luther King. The year is 1968. No, it's 1959: Before Strange is ready to don a Metro Police Department uniform, he has to bond as a 13-year-old with Billy Georgelakos, tell Carmen Hill she's pretty, and get caught shoplifting by a hard-nosed security guard who briskly sets him back on the straight and narrow and consigns his no-goodnik companions, Dominic and Angelo Martini, to a hopeless slide downward. Nine years later, once his old friends have acquired women and TVs on the installment plan, Derek is doing his best to protect and to serve. It's not easy when his soul brothers are constantly telling him he's sold out to the Man and his biological brother Dennis has graduated from the Navy reserve to serious addiction and a seriously bad crowd headlined by casual killer Alvin Jones and his cousin Kenneth Willis. Pelecanos has never written better than when he presents Alvin falling in love with a Cadillac El Dorado, seeing his plans for a robbery to finance it fall through, and instantly starting an alternate plan for some new crime. As Dr. King marches unwittingly toward an assassin's bullet in Memphis, the nation's capital simmers in lesser crimes that'll come to a head just in time for the city to boil over in violence. Though Pelecanos never convincingly draws King's death and its aftermath into his endless round of fictional crimes, he excels at using the maelstrom that follows the assassination to dramatize the utter breakdown of social mores among everybody from Alvin Jones to Derek Strange.The most conventionally ambitious of Pelecanos's sprawling studies of D.C. crime: pat in its sociological determinism, harrowing in its portraits of each hopeless loser and the few ex-losers who escape. Author tour
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446611435
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2005
  • Series: Derek Strange & Terry Quinn Series , #4
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 4.16 (h) x 1.11 (d)

Meet the Author

George Pelecanos is the author of several highly praised and bestselling novels, including The Cut, What It Was, The Way Home, The Turnaround, and The Night Gardener. He is also an independent-film producer, an essayist, and the recipient of numerous international writing awards. He was a producer and Emmy-nominated writer for The Wire and currently writes for the acclaimed HBO series Treme. He lives in Maryland.

Biography

Few writers have employed the mean streets of Washington, D.C. as effectively as George Pelecanos, the award-winning author of two acclaimed detective series and several standalone noirs of exceptional quality.

Pelecanos debuted in 1992, with A Firing Offense, a fast-paced crime novel that introduced Nick Stefanos, a Greek-American advertising executive for an electronics chain who is reluctantly drawn into investigative work when a stock boy at his company goes missing. By book's end, Nick has lost his job and applied for his P.I. license, paving the way for further (mis)adventures. Neverthless, the series has proved anything but predictable. Some books move forward in time to reveal Nick's sad descent into alcoholism; others flash back to investigate his family's past—with Nick relegated to cameo appearances in stories that span several generations and feature a cast of interrelated characters. Beloved by readers and critics alike, the Stefanos books cast unsparing light on a city tragically mired in crime, poverty, and racism.

In his Derek Strange and Terry Quinn series, Pelecanos delves further into the racial and cultural divide between white and black. Beginning with 2001's Right as Rain, these novels feature a "salt and pepper" team of ex-cops turned detectives who forge an uneasy friendship as they investigate cases in the blighted heart of D.C. The very model of noir, the stories are steeped in the violence, brutality, and despair of urban life, but the dynamic between the tough but sensitive Strange and his younger, more volatile partner offers a hopeful and humanizing counterbalance.

A distinguishing characteristic of Pelecanos's writing is an inclusion of musical references to create atmosphere, anchor period settings, and develop his characters' personalities. (His 2004 novel Hard Revolution, a prequel to the Strange/Quinn books, was packaged in limited quantity with a CD of '70s soul music.) Pelecanos has also published mysteries and thrillers, short fiction, reviews and essays, and screenplays for film and television—most notably HBO's superb urban procedural The Wire.

Good To Know

In our interview, Pelecanos shared some interesting anecdotes about past gigs:

"I began to work at my father's lunch counter in downtown D. C. when I was 11 years old, the summer after the riots of April 1968. It was the single most influential experience of my life. Everything I've written about since has seeds in that summer."

"Another good job I had was selling women's shoes, for obvious reasons. Writing for a living isn't bad, either. It beats digging ditches or washing dishes. I know, because I've done those things, too."

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Read an Excerpt

Hard Revolution


By George Pelecanos

Little, Brown

Copyright © 2004 George Pelecanos
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-316-60897-1


Chapter One

DEREK STRANGE GOT down in a three-point stance. He breathed evenly, as his father had instructed him to do, and took in the pleasant smell of April. Magnolias, dogwoods, and cherry trees were in bloom around the city. The scent of their flowers, and the heavy fragrance of a nearby lilac bush growing against a residential fence, filled the air.

"You keep your back straight," said Derek, "like you're gonna set a dinner up on it. You ain't want your butt up in the air, either. That way you're ready. You just blow right out, like, and hit the holes. Bust on through."

Derek and his Saturday companion, Billy Georgelakos, were in an alley that ran behind the Three-Star Diner on a single-number block of Kennedy Street, at the eastern edge of Northwest D.C. Both were twelve years old.

"Like your man," said Billy, sitting on a milk crate, an Our Army at War comic book rolled tightly in his meaty hand.

"Yeah," said Derek. "Here go Jim Brown right here."

Derek came up out of his stance and exploded forward, one palm hovering above the other, both close to his chest. He took an imaginary handoff as he ran a few steps, then cut, slowed down, turned, and walked back toward Billy.

Derek had a way of moving. It was confident but not cocky, shoulders squared, with a slight looseness to the hips. He had copied the walk from his older brother, Dennis. Derek was the right height for his age, but like all boys and most men, he wished to be taller. Lately, at night when he was in bed, he thought he could feel himself growing. The mirror over his mother's dresser told him he was filling out in the upper body, too.

Billy, despite his wide shoulders and unusually broad chest, was not an athlete. He kept up on the local sports teams, but he had other passions. Billy liked pinball machines, cap pistols, and comic books.

"That how Brown got his twelve yards in eleven carries against the 'Skins?" said Billy.

"Uh-uh, Billy, don't be talkin' about that."

"Don Bosseler gained more in that game than Brown did."

"In that game. Most of the time, Bosseler ain't fit to carry my man's cleats. Two weeks before that, at Griffith? Jim Brown ran for one hundred and fifty-two. The man set the all-time rushing record in that one, Billy. Don Bosseler? Shoot."

"Awright," said Billy, a smile forming on his wide face. "Your man can play."

Derek knew Billy was messing with him, but he couldn't help getting agitated just the same. Not that Derek wasn't a Redskins fan. He listened to every game on the radio. He read the Shirley Povich and Bob Addie columns in the Post whenever they saw print. He followed the stats of quarterback Eddie LeBaron, middle linebacker Chuck Drazenovich, halfback Eddie Sutton, and others. He even tracked Bosseler's yards-per-carry. In fact, he only rooted against the 'Skins twice a year, and then with a pang of guilt, when they played Cleveland.

Derek had a newspaper photo of Brown taped to the wall of the bedroom he shared with his brother. With the exception of his father, there was no one who was more of a hero to him than Brown. This was a strong individual who commanded respect, not just from his own but from people of all colors. The man could play.

"Don Bosseler," said Derek, chuckling. He put one big, long-fingered hand to the top of his head, shaved nearly to the scalp, and rubbed it. It was something his brother, Dennis, did in conversation when he was cracking on his friends. Derek had picked up the gesture, like his walk, from Dennis.

"I'm kiddin' you, Derek." Billy got up off the milk crate and put his comic book down on the diner's back stoop. "C'mon, let's go."

"Where?"

"My neighborhood. Maybe there's a game up at Fort Stevens."

"Okay," said Derek. Billy's streets were a couple of miles from the diner and several miles from Derek's home. Most of the kids up there were white. But Derek didn't object. Truth was, it excited him some to be off his turf.

On most Saturdays, Derek and Billy spent their time out in the city while their fathers worked at the diner. They were boys and were expected to go out and find adventure and even mild forms of trouble. There was violence in certain sections of the District, but it was committed by adults and usually among criminals and mostly at night. Generally, the young went untouched.

Out on the main drag, Derek noticed that the local movie house, the Kennedy, was still running Buchanan Rides Alone, with Randolph Scott. Derek had already seen it with his dad. His father had promised to take him down to U Street for the new John Wayne, Rio Bravo, which had people talking around town. The picture was playing down at the Republic. Like the other District theaters on U, the Lincoln and the Booker T, the Republic was mostly for colored, and Derek felt comfortable there. His father, Darius Strange, loved westerns, and Derek Strange had come to love them, too.

Derek and Billy walked east on the commercial strip. They passed two boys Derek knew from church, and one of them said, "What you hangin' with that white boy for?" and Derek said, "What business is that of yours?" He made just enough eye contact for the boy to know he was serious, and all of them went on their way.

Billy was Derek's first and only white playmate. The working relationship between their fathers had caused their hookup. Otherwise they never would have been put together, since most of the time, outside of sporting events and first jobs, colored boys and white boys didn't mix. Wasn't anything wrong with mixing, exactly, but it just seemed more natural to be with your own kind. Hanging with Billy sometimes put Derek in a bad position; you'd get challenged out here when your own saw you walking with a white. But Derek figured you had to stand by someone unless he gave you cause not to, and he felt he had to say something when conflict arrived. It wouldn't have been right to let it pass. Sure, Billy often said the wrong things, and sometimes those things hurt, but it was because he didn't know any better. He was ignorant, but his ignorance was never deliberate.

They walked northwest through Manor Park, across the green of Fort Slocum, and soon were up on Georgia Avenue, which many thought of as Main Street, D.C. It was the longest road in the District and had always been the primary northern thoroughfare into Washington, going back to when it was called the 7th Street Pike. All types of businesses lined the strip, and folks moved about the sidewalks day and night. The Avenue was always alive.

The road was white concrete and etched with streetcar tracks. Wood platforms, where riders had once waited to board streetcars, were still up in spots, but the D.C. Transit buses were now the main form of public transportation. A few steel troughs, used to water the horses that had pulled the carts of the junkmen and fruit and vegetable vendors, remained on the Avenue, but in short order all of it would be going the way of those mobile merchants. It was said that the street would soon be paved in asphalt and the tracks, platforms, and troughs would disappear.

Billy's neighborhood, Brightwood, was mostly white, working- and middle-class, and heavily ethnic: Greeks, Italians, Irish Catholics, and all varieties of Jew. The families had moved from Petworth, 7th Street, Columbia Heights, the H Street corridor in Northeast, and Chinatown, working their way north as they began to make more money in the prosperous years following World War II. They were seeking nicer housing, yards for their children, and driveways for their cars. Also, they were moving away from the colored, whose numbers and visibility had rapidly increased citywide in the wake of reurbanization and forced desegregation.

But even this would be a temporary move. Blockbuster real estate agents in Brightwood had begun moving colored families into white streets with the intention of scaring residents into selling their houses on the cheap. The next stop for upper-Northwest, east-of-the-park whites would be the suburbs of Maryland. No one knew that the events of the next nine years would hasten that final move, though there was a feeling that some sort of change was coming and that it would have to come, an unspoken sense of the inevitable. Still, some denied it as strongly as they denied death.

Derek lived in Park View, south of Petworth, now mostly colored and some working-class whites. He attended Backus Junior High and would go on to Roosevelt High School. Billy went to Paul Junior High and was destined for Coolidge High, which had some coloreds, most of whom were athletes. Many Coolidge kids would go on to college; far fewer from Roosevelt would. Roosevelt had gangs; Coolidge had fraternities. Derek and Billy lived a few short miles apart, but the differences in their lives and prospects were striking.

They walked the east side of Georgia's 6200 block, passing the open door of the Arrow cleaners, a business that had been in place since 1929, owned and operated by Bill Caludis. They stopped in to say hey to Caludis's son, Billy, whom Billy Georgelakos knew from church. On the corner sat Clark's Men's Shop, near Marinoff-Pritt and Katz, the Jewish market, where several of the butchers had camp numbers tattooed on their forearms. Nearby was the Sheridan Theater, which was running Decision at Sundown, another Randolph Scott. Derek had seen it with his dad.

They crossed to the other side of Georgia. They walked by Vince's Agnes Flower Shop, where Billy paused to say a few words with a cute young clerk named Margie, and the Sheridan Waffle Shop, also known as John's Lunch, a diner owned by John Deoudes. Then it was a watering hole called Sue's 6210, a Chinese laundry, a barbershop, and on the corner another beer garden, the 6200. "Stagger Lee" was playing on the house juke, its rhythms coming through the 6200's open door.

On the sidewalk outside the bar, three young white teenagers were alternately talking, smoking cigarettes, and running combs through their hair. One of them was ribbing another, asking if his girlfriend had given him his shiner and swollen face. "Nah," said the kid with the black eye, "I got jumped by a buncha niggers down at Griffith Stadium," adding that he was going to be looking for them and "some get-back." The group quieted as Derek and Billy passed. There were no words spoken, no hard stares, and no trouble. Derek looking at the weak, all-mouth boy and thinking, Prob'ly wasn't no "buncha niggers" about it, only had to be one.

At the corner of Georgia and Rittenhouse, Billy pointed excitedly at a man wearing a brimmed hat, crossing the street and heading east. With him was a young woman whose face they couldn't see but whose backside moved in a pleasing way.

"That's Bo Diddley," said Billy.

"Thought he lived over on Rhode Island Avenue."

"That's what everyone says. But we all been seein' him around here lately. They say he's got a spot down there on Rittenhouse."

"Bo Diddley's a gunslinger," said Derek, a warmth rising in his thighs as he checked out the fill of the woman's skirt.

They walked south to Quackenbos and cut across the lot of the Nativity School, a Catholic convent that housed a nice gymnasium. The nuns there were forever chasing Billy and his friends from the gym. Beyond the lot was Fort Stevens, where Confederate forces had been repelled by the guns and musketry of Union soldiers in July of 1864. The fort had been re-created and preserved, but few tourists now visited the site. The grounds mainly served as a playing field for the neighborhood boys.

"Ain't nobody up here," said Derek, looking across the weedy field, the American flag flying on a white mast throwing a wavy shadow on the lawn.

"I'm gonna pick some porichia for my mom," said Billy.

"Say what?"

Derek and Billy went up a steep grade to its crest, where several cannons sat spaced in a row. The grade dropped to a deep gully that ran along the northern line of the fort. Beside one of the cannons grew patches of spindly plants with hard stems. Billy pulled a few of the plants and shook the dirt off the roots.

"Thought your mama liked them dandelion weeds."

"That's rodichia. These here are good, too. You gotta get 'em before they flower, though, 'cause then they're too bitter. Let's go give 'em to her and get something to drink."

Billy lived in a slate-roofed, copper-guttered brick colonial on the 1300 block of Somerset, a few blocks west of the park. In contrast with the row houses of Park View and Petworth, the houses here were detached, with flat, well-tended front lawns. The streets were heavy with Italians and Greeks. The Deoudes family lived on Somerset, as did the Vondas family, and up on Underwood lived a wiry kid named Bobby Boukas, whose parents owned a flower shop. All were members of Billy's church, St. Sophia. On Tuckerman stood the house where midget actor Johnny Puleo, who had played in the Lancaster-Curtis circus picture, Trapeze, stayed for much of the year. Puleo drove a customized Dodge with wood blocks fitted to the gas and brake pedals.

On the way to the Georgelakos house, Derek stopped to pet a muscular tan boxer who was usually chained outside the front of the Deoudes residence. The dog's name was Greco. Greco sometimes walked with the police at night on their foot patrols and was known to be quick, loyal, and tough.

Derek got down on his haunches and let Greco smell his hand. The dog pushed his muzzle into Derek's fingers, and Derek patted his belly and rubbed behind his ears.

"Crazy," said Billy.

"What you mean?"

"Usually he rises up and shows his teeth."

"To colored boys, right?"

"Well, yeah."

"He likes me." Derek's eyes softened as he admired the dog. "One day, I'm a get me one just like him, too."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Hard Revolution by George Pelecanos Copyright © 2004 by George Pelecanos. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Hard Revolution

    Although this novel features Derek Strange, Hard Revolution has the feel of George Pelecanos's masterpiece the D.C. Quartet, filling in the sixties, in this case, the '68 riots after the assassination of MLK Jr. However, this novel is not about the riots. Instead, the riots, and it's preceding events form a tension-filled stage in which Pelecanos weaves several stories involving a number of characters, colliding violently. The riots provide a terrific, terrifying set-piece near the end of the novel. Pelecanos is my favorite author and having read most of his novels, it is clear that his prose, dialogue, characters, depiction of violence, message, and pop-culture references are his strengths (that's a lot of strengths, but like I said, he's my favorite writer) and he doesn't hold back in Hard Revolution, which is among one of his best works. Hard revolution is a classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    Highly recommended!!

    As with all his writings ,Mr Pelecanos takes the reader on two real journeys, one through the souls of his players and one through the streets of the non-political D.C.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    Much more than a crime fiction novel

    Hard Revolution is the first George Pelecanos book I have read and I would consider it one of the best books I have ever read. While it falls in the ¿crime fiction¿ genre, it is much more than that. It is a book that captures a time and place as well as any. I had the pleasure of seeing the author speak and when asked to recommend other books, rather than mentioning other crime fiction books, he recommended The Known World by Edward Jones ¿ the outstanding Pulitzer Prize winner. I felt that the characters in Hard Revolution were equally as well developed as those in The Known World, and that the book showed a balanced and real depiction of life in the city in the late 1960s. The crime and investigation aspects of the plot are very well handled, without being overly detailed or ridiculously convenient. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants either a great read or a great crime fiction story ¿ or both.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2004

    Pelecanos brings it again

    If you are new to Pelecanos books, 'Hard Revolution' is a perfect place to start. Series hero Derek Strange gets more depth, and characterization in this 'prequel to the three earlier volumes in this series. Pelecanos transcends the mystery/thriller genre with each succeeding outing. The writing is masterful, as good as the best American writers working today in any genre. This should come with a warning label: 'May cause loss of sleep because it is impossible to put down.'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 5, 2012

    excellent

    great characters and dialogue

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    Fills in a lot of blanks

    Not sure why this is called the Derek Strange/Terry Quinn Series 4....Terry is never mentioned in the book, but it does fill in a lot of blanks in the life of Derek.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2007

    Slow in the begging

    This was the first book I have read by this author. It started of really slow, I almost put the book down nothing happened by chapeter 6. It gets better just read on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2004

    Very Good Crime Fiction

    This was one heck of a read. Pellecanos does a wonderful job of weaving a very intriguing crime drama with the real life drama of Washington, DC in the 60's.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2008

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews

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