Hardcore Ragga: The Music Works Dancehall Hits

Hardcore Ragga: The Music Works Dancehall Hits

     
 
From outside Jamaica, it may appear that the dancehall scene is forever cannibalizing its past. In fact, it's the opposite, the past actually arises anew, phoenix-like, into the present scene. And nowhere is that clearer than with Gussie Clarke's productions, as he pulled deep roots back into the dancehalls in a totally contemporary electronic guise, while sifting in

Overview

From outside Jamaica, it may appear that the dancehall scene is forever cannibalizing its past. In fact, it's the opposite, the past actually arises anew, phoenix-like, into the present scene. And nowhere is that clearer than with Gussie Clarke's productions, as he pulled deep roots back into the dancehalls in a totally contemporary electronic guise, while sifting in elements of even earlier styles. Clarke's cuts were built exclusively around the rhythms, some so phat as to be pure dread, with the atmospheres created by a mere smattering of keyboards. This seemingly simple backdrop worked brilliantly with vocalists across the musical spectrum, and Hardcore Ragga showcases the breadth of Clarke's work, as well as functioning as a best-of collection of his late-'80s hits (this is a reissue of a 1990 compilation). The suppleness of his style is evident by the careful sequencing, which lines the same or similar rhythms up one after another. Thus, Gregory Isaacs' "Rumours" is followed by J.C. Lodge's U.S. smash "Telephone Love" and Lady G.'s "Nuff Respect" -- the first two utilize the same rhythm, the third a variation. In one fell swoop, the songs sweep from deep roots to club pop and into straight dancehall. Elsewhere, lovers rock star Deborah Glasgow glows from Clarke's attention, while the hardcore crew is given equal respect. Shabba Ranks, already a star in Jamaica, had the producer to thank for his international success, which was down to Clarke's decision to pair the gruff toaster with a variety of dulcet females and sweet-singing males. Ranks is splashed across the album's grooves, both on his own and with a variety of partners (notably Lodge, Krystal, and Cocoa Tea), while Lodge herself is also heavily featured. There are 16 crucial cuts in all, including the fabulous "Pirates' Anthem" (a tribute to Britain's pirate radio stations), the clubby "Champion Lover," the hardcore "Dancehall Good to We," and the aforementioned "Nuff Respect" (Lady G.'s toughly toasted lesson on how to "live independent" cum demand for respect). And while "Rumours" may have been Clarke's groundbreaker and "Telephone Love" his best remembered hit from the day, every one of these tracks had a significant impact at the time.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/26/1998
Label:
Greensleeves
UPC:
0601811015124
catalogNumber:
151

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Shabba Ranks   Track Performer
Cocoa Tea   Track Performer
Papa San   Track Performer
Pam Hall   Background Vocals
Alvin   Percussion
Rass Brass   Horn
Cleveland "Clevie" Browne   Percussion,Drums,Background Vocals
Danny Browne   Synthesizer,Bass,Guitar
Dalton Browne   Synthesizer,Bass,Guitar
Dean Fraser   Horn,Background Vocals
Brian & Tony Gold   Background Vocals
Tony Gold   Background Vocals
Bongo Herman   Percussion
Gregory Isaacs   Track Performer
Wycliffe "Steely" Johnson   Bass
Sky Juice   Percussion
J.C. Lodge   Background Vocals,Track Performer
Robert Lyn   Synthesizer
Steely   Bass
Nadine Sutherland   Background Vocals
Mikey Bennett   Background Vocals
Lady G   Track Performer
Deborahe Glasgow   Track Performer
Krystal   Track Performer
Rebel Princess   Track Performer
Brian Gold   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Augustus "Gussie" Clarke   Producer
Dean Fraser   Vocal Arrangements
Sylvester Gordon   Engineer
Courtney Michael Small   Engineer
Mikey Bennett   Vocal Arrangements
Music Works Crew   Arranger

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